reese's recent activity

  1. Comment on How do you feel about where you live? in ~talk

    reese Link Parent
    This is the first time I've heard of The Good Place. Well, I like moral philosophy. Ted Danson is cool. The show's on Netflix. I'll watch it and get back to you.

    This is the first time I've heard of The Good Place.

    Well, I like moral philosophy. Ted Danson is cool. The show's on Netflix.

    I'll watch it and get back to you.

    1 vote
  2. Comment on Why People Keep Rear-Ending Self-Driving Cars in ~tech

    reese (edited ) Link Parent
    Thank you for bringing this up. I wanted to check on our real-life control group (non-AVs) before posting the article, but ran out of time last night, and figured someone would dig into this. For...

    Thank you for bringing this up. I wanted to check on our real-life control group (non-AVs) before posting the article, but ran out of time last night, and figured someone would dig into this. For some reason I had some unchecked faith in Wired's reporting, and now I don't.

    It's clear to me that the reporting was just as hurried as my posting this topic, because otherwise I would have changed the topic title or first comment to reflect this. This Wired article (written by a certain Jack Stewart) is lazy, if not outright misleading, and I feel bad for not doing my due diligence in vetting it. To make up for it, according to the NTSB, there were 1,700,000 rear-end crashes in 2012 (obviously for the U.S.). Contrast that with 5,419,000 total crashes in 2010, according to the NHTSA. Now I couldn't find data to get the years to line up, but it's close enough. This means:

    Approximately 31% of non-AV collisions are rear-end crashes. Almost one third.

    We have a crisis on our hands. The majority of morons who rear-end other people from not paying attention are doing the same to non-people. How will we regulate the non-people to solve this people problem? /s

    10 votes
  3. Comment on Ubuntu 18.10 released in ~tech

    reese Link Parent
    Right. I didn't want to explain that because it seemed too off-topic, but I'm sure others will appreciate the clarification. I'm just highlighting the fact that my favorite distro has its own...

    Right. I didn't want to explain that because it seemed too off-topic, but I'm sure others will appreciate the clarification. I'm just highlighting the fact that my favorite distro has its own package manager with nonsensical naming.

    4 votes
  4. Comment on Why People Keep Rear-Ending Self-Driving Cars in ~tech

    reese Link
    Outline link. Note that the article only speculates on the why. Here are some quotes:

    Outline link.

    Note that the article only speculates on the why. Here are some quotes:

    Drilling down into the data shows that autonomous vehicles being rear-ended accounts for 28 of the 49 filed reports [so far in 2018], nearly two-thirds.

    . . . combine that with the fact that the computer was in charge in 22 of those 28 rear-end crashes, and you have reason to believe that the AVs are doing something that makes cars behind them more likely to hit them.

    [Kyle] Vogt [, CEO of GM-subsidiary Cruise Automation,] says the California crash reports make clear that humans expect other humans to bend or break traffic rules, rolling through four-way intersections, accelerating to make a yellow light, or cruising over the speed limit. But his robots won’t follow suit.

    Short of requiring some sort of test, one easy change could be basic standards for how these vehicles are marked, alerting other road users to how they usually drive. Think of the stickers many countries require newer drivers to display in their vehicles (like the L for learners in the UK). Or the signs like on vans and trucks saying “This vehicle makes frequent stops,” “This vehicle stops at all railroad crossings,” or “does not turn right on red.”

    17 votes
  5. Comment on Ubuntu 18.10 released in ~tech

    reese Link Parent
    Ubuntu is the gateway drug of Linux distros. It has a special place in my heart. In the past, Ubuntu containers made life easier at my job more than a couple times. It's also good to see that...

    Ubuntu is the gateway drug of Linux distros. It has a special place in my heart. In the past, Ubuntu containers made life easier at my job more than a couple times. It's also good to see that snaps are picking up in popularity. I honestly have no preference to them over flatpak—I'm just happy that the Linux community supports standardization of package managers. Relatedly, my go-to personal distro is Solus, which happens to use the Evolve OS package manager for... reasons.

    14 votes
  6. Comment on Faces of a new capitalism: How Millennials are embracing socialist values in ~news

    reese Link Parent
    Thank you, I'll read it.

    Thank you, I'll read it.

  7. Comment on The Internet Apologizes …Even those who designed our digital world are aghast at what they created. A breakdown of what went wrong — from the architects who built it. in ~tech

    reese Link
    This article lays out every reason why we need to double-down on Tildes and prove that it works. We must support the site. I finally started donating via Patreon the other day, and I stopped...

    This article lays out every reason why we need to double-down on Tildes and prove that it works. We must support the site. I finally started donating via Patreon the other day, and I stopped feeling ashamed for enjoying this site so much. Right now there are only 94 patrons contributing ~$442 monthly. We can do better than that. I've observed in my short time here that there are several tech people around who not only have the skills to contribute code, but, at the very least, must have a few dollars lying around each month. There are other ways to contribute, but come on.

    In the New York Magazine piece, Stallman says, "We need a law. Fuck them . . .", referring to companies like Reddit and Facebook. He's right, but, speaking for the U.S., who is passing that law? Our "representatives" profit off the same companies they pretend to lambaste on C-SPAN. Another Tildes user opened my eyes to the concept, regretfully later in my life than I'm proud of, that maybe true reform in this country is practically impossible. That means that we have to embody the change we want to see. That can start right here, right now. Unfortunately we may have to take responsibility for unfucking the Internet.

    20 votes
  8. Comment on What editor do you use? in ~comp

    reese Link Parent
    I am interested. Thank you for sharing this. I'll try it later today.

    I am interested. Thank you for sharing this. I'll try it later today.

    3 votes
  9. Comment on What editor do you use? in ~comp

    reese Link Parent
    Yes. I switched to amVim because the more popular extension gave VS Code diarrhea. Try amVim and let me know how it goes.

    Yes. I switched to amVim because the more popular extension gave VS Code diarrhea. Try amVim and let me know how it goes.

    4 votes
  10. Comment on Philosophical/cognitive works on the concept of "pattern"? in ~humanities

    reese Link Parent
    You're welcome. Please let me know if it is published! Good luck, and have fun.

    You're welcome. Please let me know if it is published! Good luck, and have fun.

    1 vote
  11. Comment on Instagram Has a Massive Harassment Problem in ~tech

    reese Link
    This is a long article, so I cherry-picked some quotes that highlight the technical and logistical concerns at play:

    This is a long article, so I cherry-picked some quotes that highlight the technical and logistical concerns at play:

    While Instagram does auto-filter certain words from comments, users say trolls simply add an extra letter or symbol to escape the filters. “People always find new ways to spell terrible things,” said Katie, a plus-size fashion Instagrammer with hundreds of thousands of followers who asked to be referred to by a pseudonym because she fears retaliation from both Instagram and her harassers. She said trolls have called her employer, attempted to sabotage her day job, threatened to mutilate her body, and more.

    According to an Instagram spokesperson, Facebook and Instagram share a team of 20,000 people working on safety and security across both platforms. Of that team, 7,500 people—a mix of contractors, full-time employees, and staff from “partner companies”—are tasked with reviewing content from the more than 1 billion people who use Instagram, and 2 billion who use Facebook, every month around the world. It’s a Sisyphean task, according to the people who do it.

    Allie, a former employee at Instagram, agreed. “Instagram has terrible tools. I think people haven’t really focused on it much because so many harassment campaigns are just more visible on other platforms,” she said. Throughout her time there, she said, “many of the efforts to reduce harassment were oriented toward PR, but very few engineering and community resources were put toward actually decreasing harassment.”

    Earlier this year, for instance, Instagram announced it would be leveraging Facebook’s machine-learning system, DeepText, to help moderate the platform. But Facebook has also struggled to stem harassment on its platform. It was Facebook’s very own moderation system that led to women being locked out of their accounts or banned from posting on Facebook when they negatively commented about men in the wake of the #MeToo movement.

    11 votes
  12. Comment on Philosophical/cognitive works on the concept of "pattern"? in ~humanities

    reese (edited ) Link
    If you've read Gödel, Escher, Bach (GEB), then you know that Douglas Hofstadter obsesses over isomorphism, analogy, meaning, and self-reference. Here's a relevant quote from the book: Lewis Hyde,...

    If you've read Gödel, Escher, Bach (GEB), then you know that Douglas Hofstadter obsesses over isomorphism, analogy, meaning, and self-reference. Here's a relevant quote from the book:

    Recursive enumeration is a process in which new things emerge from old things by fixed rules. There seem to be many surprises in such processes-for example the unpredictability of the Q-sequence. It might seem that recursively defined sequences of that type possess some sort of inherently increasing complexity of behavior, so that the further out you go, the less predictable they get. This kind of thought carried a little further suggests that suitably complicated recursive systems might be strong enough to break out of any predetermined patterns. And isn't this one of the defining properties of intelligence? Instead of just considering programs composed of procedures which can recursively call themselves, why not get really sophisticated, and invent programs which can modify themselves-programs which can act on programs, extending them, improving them, generalizing them, fixing them, and so on? This kind of "tangled recursion" probably lies at the heart of intelligence.

    Lewis Hyde, on the other hand, is interested in myths from around the world. He has something to say about the emergence of "new things" in Trickster Makes This World:

    In short, trickster is a boundary-crosser. Every group has its edge, its sense of in and out, and trickster is always there, at the gates of the city and the gates of life, making sure there is commerce. He also attends the internal boundaries by which groups articulate their social life. We constantly distinguish—right and wrong, sacred and profane, clean and dirty, male and female, young and old, living and dead—and in every case trickster will cross the line and confuse the distinction. Trickster is the creative idiot, therefore, the wise fool, and the gray-haired baby, the cross-dresser, the speaker of sacred profanities. Where someone's sense of honorable behavior has left him unable to act, trickster will appear to suggest an amoral action, something right/wrong that will get life going again. Trickster is the mythic embodiment of ambiguity and ambivalence, doubleness and duplicity, contradiction and paradox.

    For Hofstadter, there are rules/meta-rules that govern the interactions of our universe, and those rules are recursively enumerable, Type-0 grammars in the Chomsky hierarchy. Apply this as a lens to emergence. It becomes apparent that self-organization and self-reference are inherent qualities of the universe that underpin life processes and consciousness. Consider natural selection, wherein the environment "reflects" in the shape and behavior of a living thing. Hyde takes the cultural approach to the same problem. Where do new things come from? Myths of Coyote and Hermes tell us that people have been intuitively aware of tricksters as mutators on norms, or established patterns of behavior. There is a crossroads where paths intersect such that new patterns emerge out of old.

    I suspect that patterns are meaningful to human beings because we are patterns. Hofstadter clarifies his similar stance in I Am a Strange Loop, which was written long after GEB. Not to go all 420 on you, but we are literally the universe observing itself. Neil deGrasse Tyson has publicly shared similar thoughts. With all that said, I do not know if meaning extends beyond observation or thought. I can ask, "Why are things the way they are? Why does the universe exist?" The "just because" answer does not reflect our process of scientific inquiry, but our body of knowledge is predicated on causal relationships. I don't know if causation is anything more than an internal quality of the universe. In order to better understand the universe outside itself, we may have to abandon these conventionally accepted patterns for the sake of new knowledge—but wait—goddammit, that is the pattern we've used to expand our body of knowledge all along.

    3 votes
  13. Comment on What editor do you use? in ~comp

    reese Link
    I use Vim since it's simple and ubiquitous, and I also use plugins for Vim in other IDEs and editors. Specifically, I tend to use VS Code with the amVim extension. One feature I like about VS Code...

    I use Vim since it's simple and ubiquitous, and I also use plugins for Vim in other IDEs and editors. Specifically, I tend to use VS Code with the amVim extension. One feature I like about VS Code is Live Share. It enables distributed mob/pair programming far better than garbage-ass Skype and WebEx.

    25 votes
  14. Comment on The Making of Fallout Shelter - Noclip Documentary in ~games

    reese Link
    I never played Fallout Shelter, but I learned a lot from this documentary. I had no idea that the entire game was made solely with Fallout 4's marketing budget. I never really considered the...

    I never played Fallout Shelter, but I learned a lot from this documentary. I had no idea that the entire game was made solely with Fallout 4's marketing budget. I never really considered the significance that it was released during E3, either. The fact that it crashed Apple's CDN is hilarious. I'm so ignorant that I had no idea that Fallout Shelter resulted in the Montreal satellite studio. I was aware of the Austin studio, but only because Austin has been on my job radar.

    After a discussion from the other day, I realized that I never played Fallout 4 that much. I looked on Steam and saw that I played it for about 50 hours in 2015, and then had to stop because of school and work shit. Well, I picked it back up and I'm loving it. It has its bugs, but overall I'm enjoying it. I still think the RP in past Fallout titles was much better, but the game scratches the itch for me, especially because I'm not interested in Fallout 76.

    3 votes
  15. Comment on Last Year, The Flu Put Him In A Coma. This Year He's Getting The Shot in ~health

    reese Link
    That is horrible, and I am not surprised. Last January I contracted the flu while moving across the country. I could somehow keep my shit together while driving, but once I arrived at my new...

    An estimated 80,000 Americans died of the flu, or flu-related complications, last winter, according to initial estimates from CDC presented in September. It was the highest number of flu related deaths in decades, and Hinderliter was nearly among them. Now, after 58 days in the hospital, a week in a medically induced coma, two surgeries and three weeks in a nursing home, he's speaking out to encourage everyone to do something he'd never done before: Get a flu shot [my emphasis].

    That is horrible, and I am not surprised. Last January I contracted the flu while moving across the country. I could somehow keep my shit together while driving, but once I arrived at my new rented abode, I collapsed on the stairs. My girlfriend dragged me to an air mattress. Then I'm pretty sure I went into shock while she went out for some food and medicine. The interesting part was tripping on whatever my brain secreted while I was dying, but there are safer ways to hallucinate, kids. That's why, just like the other idiot in the article, I'm getting a flu shot this year.

    5 votes
  16. Comment on Kanye West pitches “Yeezy Centers of Ideation” in Oval Office meeting in ~news

    reese Link Parent
    Yeah, in retrospect I probably shouldn't have gone with people who have a 130+ I.Q. That's not surprising with comedians. I should have just stuck with the music industry or, better yet, just...

    Yeah, in retrospect I probably shouldn't have gone with people who have a 130+ I.Q. That's not surprising with comedians. I should have just stuck with the music industry or, better yet, just randomly selected someone who participated on The Apprentice.

    1 vote
  17. Comment on Microsoft joins Open Invention Network to help protect Linux and open source in ~tech

    reese (edited ) Link Parent
    It all has to do with Microsoft's enterprise cloud strategy. Microsoft knows that Windows is a poorly architected operating system for running servers. It's inherently insecure. That's why...

    It all has to do with Microsoft's enterprise cloud strategy.

    Microsoft knows that Windows is a poorly architected operating system for running servers. It's inherently insecure. That's why Microsoft's attempting to tentacle-fuck Linux—they know they can't make Windows better—so they want control over containers that will run .NET Core and everything else. This compounds with the fact that Microsoft knows that Kubernetes is the future of container orchestration runtimes, which is why they've incorporated it into Azure. Furthermore, they've watched relatively small companies like Pivotal sponsor an open source framework with the utmost efficacy and fairness, leading to community engagement and, consequently, corporate clients for PKS, PCF, consulting/training engagements, etc. That's where .NET Core comes into play: it's the natural response to Spring. The idea of this framework is to give developers the no-nonsense tools they want to make cloud-native APIs, thereby stirring the grassroots change that results in contracts.

    5 votes
  18. Comment on Will Trumponomics Collapse? in ~news

    reese Link
    If we're comparing recent presidencies over time by growth of the Dow Jones Industrial Average, then Trump has had almost the same rate of growth we observed during Obama's presidency after the...

    If we're comparing recent presidencies over time by growth of the Dow Jones Industrial Average, then Trump has had almost the same rate of growth we observed during Obama's presidency after the Great Recession. This seems... expected, to say the least. I'm not saying Obama caused the rate of growth, nor am I saying that the Dow is the only measure of economic health, but I am saying that we're observing the same rate of growth we've seen since 2009. A recent blip in the average provides a good time to reflect and write editorials, especially regarding a president who believes that the Dow is the ". . . primary confirmation that his vision for the U.S. economy is working."

    Richardson says later:

    Trump puts pressure on one of our closest allies so that a crony can make some money; Trump strong-arms Carrier so that a few hundred people can stay employed for a few weeks longer; Trump decides which industries and which countries should thrive and which should fail. The salient point is not consistency or theoretical rigor. It is that the world economy is governed by Trump’s whims. Trumponomics is not a steady state. It is, by its nature, constant turmoil.

    Prior to that statement, Richardson points out that the International Monetary Fund's World Economic Outlook expresses concern. About what? The numerous trade wars that Trump has started. The report projects major consequences for the U.S. economy sometime in 2019 or 2020. That's about when Trump could be replaced. Then the next person in charge will be inevitably blamed for Trump's belligerent and intentional intervention in the economy.

    Richardson finalizes with this:

    . . . on any given day, the businessperson looks at the numbers that provide clarity (unemployment, wages, G.D.P. growth, the stock market) and sees no reason for today to be the day for despair. Yes, of course, they are all looking, anxiously, at the President, always unsure of what he will do next but knowing something, someday, might be cataclysmic. But before then, perhaps, he’ll do something else, something that helps their business and makes them richer. They don’t know, because there is nothing to base their forecast on other than Trump’s own gut. And that is precisely how he wants it.

    5 votes