reese's recent activity

  1. Comment on What's the longest running quandary/debate you've had with yourself? in ~talk

    reese
    Link Parent
    Nothingness is an artificial concept. When we speak of 'nonexistence,' 'zero', 'nil,' 'void,' etc., we're always relating these formulations to something. How would we define zero without other...

    Nothingness is an artificial concept. When we speak of 'nonexistence,' 'zero', 'nil,' 'void,' etc., we're always relating these formulations to something. How would we define zero without other numbers accompanying it? Zero would have no meaning in that case. In this sense, we may conclude that zero is "made" of non-zero elements. It's not much of an additive identity without other numbers to add.

    Our symbols seem to only be capable of conveying things relative to other things, which suggests everything is profoundly inter-related. We grasp for absolutes starting with capital letters, like God, Mystery, Nothingness, and Nirvana. I personally do not know if it's possible for a human being to conceive of any one of these things in all its capitalized glory, but I do know, when we try, we can have interesting conversations and achieve wonderful things (assuming we don't choose stuff like Fascism).

    Back to your question: I would say there is something and nothing. If it were the case that there were nothing rather than something, then it begs the question: just how Nothing is nothing if it can be related to something? Dr. Seuss may be the only person who might have the answer to that question, but he's dead. Is he something? Is he nothing? Maybe a little bit of both.

    2 votes
  2. Comment on Shit, An implementation of git in (almost) pure POSIX shell in ~comp

    reese
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    Oh, no. I never reinvent the wheel. I need git to "intelligently" determine if, in the interactive mode of my CLI, packages in a (non-JavaScript) monorepo changed. If not, it won't ask to...

    Oh, no. I never reinvent the wheel.

    I need git to "intelligently" determine if, in the interactive mode of my CLI, packages in a (non-JavaScript) monorepo changed. If not, it won't ask to SemVer-bump them and perform related tasks. It's just an icing-on-the-cake enhancement. Anyway, for the purpose described, this command is my friend:

    git diff --name-only origin/some-branch some-branch
    

    With that, I have relative path names I can use to determine if a file in the same directory or subdirectory of a package manifest changed, meaning the interactive CLI should ask about said package.

    To clarify, what I'm making simply does not exist. It's actually not for web apps, per se. I'm apprehensive sharing details not because I don't want to share, but I don't know how I feel about doxing this account yet. If I didn't say so many stupid things here, I'd be more open to it.

    2 votes
  3. Comment on Shit, An implementation of git in (almost) pure POSIX shell in ~comp

    reese
    Link
    Lol. Related—I'm making a Node-based API/CLI to do a thing. In the process I found isomorphic-git (git implemented in JavaScript). Unsettling, yes, but it actually works! I tried it; however, its...

    How to use
    Don't

    Lol.

    Related⁠—I'm making a Node-based API/CLI to do a thing. In the process I found isomorphic-git (git implemented in JavaScript). Unsettling, yes, but it actually works! I tried it; however, its API has a lot of catch-up to do, so I settled on orchestrating git with execa.

    3 votes
  4. Comment on Andrew Yang drops out of presidential race in ~news

    reese
    Link Parent
    According to ABC News: More specifically: Turnout is about the same as 2008 for NH. The fact that Iowa's turnout was low may or may not be an aberration compared to what we'll see with the other...

    According to ABC News:

    Turnout for the New Hampshire Democratic primary has surpassed 2016 levels and is nearly as high as 2008, as Sen. Bernie Sanders is projected to win the Granite State over former Mayor Pete Buttigieg and Sen. Amy Klobuchar with 90% reporting.

    More specifically:

    In 2008, a record 288,000 people voted in the primary, which saw Sen. Hillary Clinton defeat Sen. Barack Obama and Sen. John Edwards.

    With 97% reporting as of 6:25 a.m. ET, the current New Hampshire vote tally stood at 283,440, which already surpassing the 250,000 people who voted in the 2016 New Hampshire Democratic primary.

    Turnout is about the same as 2008 for NH. The fact that Iowa's turnout was low may or may not be an aberration compared to what we'll see with the other states. Country-wide, there's not enough data yet to draw a conclusion about turnout. But specifically regarding Iowa's turnout, I mean, no wonder. The de facto requirement to stand around in a high school gymnasium for hours prohibits vast swaths of its population from voting.

    6 votes
  5. Comment on No engineer has ever sued a company because of constructive post-interview feedback. So why don’t employers do it? in ~tech

    reese
    Link Parent
    I live somewhere with a population roughly an order of magnitude greater than that of Evansville, and there are dismally few good opportunities here. As in, like, a couple I could maybe tolerate....

    I live somewhere with a population roughly an order of magnitude greater than that of Evansville, and there are dismally few good opportunities here.

    As in, like, a couple I could maybe tolerate. I'd rather not do twenty-year-old Java for the crumbling rail company. The major health insurance companies here pay well and have okay tech stacks, but 1) they shouldn't exist, 2) everyone has already established their esoteric and impenetrable ivory towers of financial security, and 3) their insurance benefits are notoriously bad, lol. And nope, also not interested in that consulting company where people get sexually harassed all the time either.

    And "good" is relative to everything else available here, by the way. Now, I like this area, and I could give a shit less about local "opportunities" since I work from home, but my wife, on the other hand, will likely need us to move for a job change soon. We're talking several hours of a drive away, at least. Super excited to move all of our cats and furniture.... but being able to move at all is a privilege I recognize and cherish.

    As far as Evansville goes (and I used to live near there for a long time), the closest metropolitan areas are Louisville and Nashville, which are over a couple hours away. So basically, as far as the person you were responding to goes, Evansville is probably it for the foreseeable future. The alternative is moving, which is always complicated for us all. I eventually escaped the Midwest with a tremendous amount of luck and effort, but abandoning all my friends and family has taken its toll.

    Point being, truly good local opportunities are probably pretty sparse for most people.

    6 votes
  6. Comment on Fitness Weekly Discussion in ~health

    reese
    Link
    Recently, I started eating vegetables. And exercising again, that is, with the routines I learned in community college. This was all prompted by a visit to the doctor. I'm not dying or anything,...

    Recently, I started eating vegetables. And exercising again, that is, with the routines I learned in community college. This was all prompted by a visit to the doctor. I'm not dying or anything, but there were objective indications that I required lifestyle changes.

    Now, you're probably thinking, "Wait, wait, wait, what the fuck? You weren't eating vegetables? Are you stupid?"

    Well, I ate them occasionally. I like peppers and onions. I'll eat broccoli or asparagus if it's there. The problem was that I made no concerted effort to include vegetables in my daily intake, meaning I had vegetables maybe once or twice a week, tops. Adding insult to injury, when I did eat them, they were oversalted and overcooked. Not to throw a pity party, but for context I grew up poor in a single-mother home, leaving a lot to be desired personally and interpersonally. Now I'm in my late twenties, and I don't have to run so fast from the Great Recession boogeyman who made my mom foreclose on our home.

    It's nice to stop and think.

    For the past couple years depression was wiping the floor with me, so I picked up some St. John's Wort. That shit actually worked, at least for me—the depression faded away and has not returned, but it didn't make me feel like my former, lively self. I was still hiding away from society, buffeted with excruciating anxiety and uncontrollable rancor in every social encounter, despite having operated as a social butterfly as recently as a few years ago. When you're a computer person, living the life of a recluse is easier than ever, but I'm here to affirm that it is unhealthy af. It's okay to work from home or whatever, but you need to go outside and be around people, and furthermore be okay with them and everything else. The inability to do so may be as simple as a nutrient deficiency, if you're like me.

    Anyway, cue voraciously eating vegetables each day, following exercise, and now I have color in my skin I didn't know I had. My hair is darker and growing like crazy, even in places where I thought it stopped. Turns out I don't need an herbal supplement, just a balanced diet. I've also started eating much more fiber by way of grains, and TMI but that's doing wonders as well. I can still be a grump, but not as much of one. My bread and butter is intellectual, so the best part is that I can solve problems again with a celerity and passion I have sorely missed.

    7 votes
  7. Comment on United Nations Guidelines for gender-inclusive language in English in ~humanities

    reese
    Link Parent
    Not the person you're responding to, and I'm happy with the singular 'they,' but its use in those examples seems contrived. I would phrase those sentences differently: The dealer should shuffle...

    Not the person you're responding to, and I'm happy with the singular 'they,' but its use in those examples seems contrived. I would phrase those sentences differently:

    • The dealer should shuffle the cards and pass one to the player on the left.
    • What did your friend want for dinner tomorrow?
    • Chris mentioned getting a new car the other day.

    The most questionable modification is probably saying the left instead of their left in the first listed sentence. I can imagine the ghost of a pedantic English teacher from my youth asking me, "Whose left, Reese? Whose left?" Well, if I tell you to pass a card to the player on the left, just whose left do you think? Yours, obviously. The information is already packed into the word itself. 'Left' is relative.

    Again, I like singular 'they,' but it's a tool I reserve for situations that call for it. Generally speaking I prefer to leave gender out entirely unless it's the subject of conversation; however, if I have to brutalize words to avoid it, then it's time to whip out the singular 'they.' Why avoid it at all? First, because most sentences are simpler without it, and, second, it will confuse those who only anticipate the plural form.

    2 votes
  8. Comment on United Nations Guidelines for gender-inclusive language in English in ~humanities

    reese
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    A bit tangential, but I distinctly remember being told throughout K-12 that the singular 'they' was "grammatically incorrect." Then I tried using passive voice to avoid gender, and received marks...

    A bit tangential, but I distinctly remember being told throughout K-12 that the singular 'they' was "grammatically incorrect." Then I tried using passive voice to avoid gender, and received marks since the active voice was preferable in all circumstances, apparently. A couple times I tried to use the pronoun 'one,' but that sounded too pompous for my "audience."

    Long story short, I was happy with the singular 'they' since I first learned to write, but I don't mean that in a self-congratulatory tone⁠—my peers were regularly penalized for the same kind of "mistake." Maybe it's obvious to others, and I don't know if there are any studies on this, but it seems like gender neutrality comes naturally to children.

    12 votes
  9. Comment on Progress update on Git's migration from SHA-1 to SHA-256 in ~comp

    reese
    Link Parent
    Is there any plan for users to self-label Offtopic, Joke, and even Noise? Every time I post an off-topic or pseudo-humorous comment on Tildes, I know what I did.

    Is there any plan for users to self-label Offtopic, Joke, and even Noise? Every time I post an off-topic or pseudo-humorous comment on Tildes, I know what I did.

    1 vote
  10. Comment on Progress update on Git's migration from SHA-1 to SHA-256 in ~comp

    reese
    Link Parent
    It's less of a reference, and more like Inglourious Basterds has infested my lexicon. At this point it may as well be non-fiction. In a few short decades I will vehemently hold that Hitler died in...

    It's less of a reference, and more like Inglourious Basterds has infested my lexicon. At this point it may as well be non-fiction. In a few short decades I will vehemently hold that Hitler died in a movie theater while watching the premiere of Nation's Pride.

    "He didn't die in a fuckin' bunker," I will aggressively say under my breath at my niece's second wedding, making everyone around me visibly uncomfortable. And I won't be the only one confused about that—there will be so many of us—old, white, fragile fucks who talk too loud at The Cheesecake Factory. Will people continue to believe that Hitler escaped to South America? Probably not, but the same line of conspiratorial thinking that brought us that bologna will live on in the feeble minds of the future.

    (Folks, feel free to label this as malice, I know it has nothing to do with SHA-1 or Git.)

    3 votes
  11. Comment on Progress update on Git's migration from SHA-1 to SHA-256 in ~comp

    reese
    Link Parent
    Thanks, that helps clarify my understanding. Okay, then, to me, the Git maintainers are just trying to get ahead of an arguably microscopic attack surface, but one that, if somehow exploited,...

    Thanks, that helps clarify my understanding. Okay, then, to me, the Git maintainers are just trying to get ahead of an arguably microscopic attack surface, but one that, if somehow exploited, could cause serious harm for a while without anybody knowing wtf is going on.

    3 votes
  12. Comment on Progress update on Git's migration from SHA-1 to SHA-256 in ~comp

    reese
    Link
    Great article. Maybe this is obvious to others, but can we walk through the steps of how this attack would go down? I don't think I'm understanding this correctly because I can't figure out how to...

    Great article. Maybe this is obvious to others, but can we walk through the steps of how this attack would go down? I don't think I'm understanding this correctly because I can't figure out how to technically accomplish it. This is what I'm thinking (for the sake of understanding, I could not and have no intention of ever doing this):

    1. I gain access to a trusted maintainer's Git credentials or remotely access their laptop or something. Better yet, I'm trusted but nobody should trust me.
    2. I add an evil function to floppy.c that streams Rick Astley videos, sneakily executing it by, say, an unassuming bit-wise operation in an if statement. For the sake of argument, let's say I know that the exact combination of characters used to produce this modification will result in the same object hash as the previous.
    3. To check this, I run git diff and it reports no change—that's what I, the infamous Never-Gonna-Give-You-Up Hacker to-be, want, because that means there's an undetected collision. Right?
    4. I make another change, an expected change known by the other maintainers of the repository, in some other file, that results in a different (and again, expected) file hash.
    5. To go along with the expected change, I have some reason to mv the file with the evil change that has thus far subverted git diff, and to Git it appears that all I did was move or rename it, not change its contents—the hash for the file itself remains unchanged.
    6. I git add -A && git commit -m "lols" && git push and that's a bingo assuming that the server lazily rewrites floppy.c from local instead of simply re-mapping a reference, but I highly doubt that's the case—this is just remapping from the remote version of the file, right, since it only detects that the file moved? Uhhh... I hope that's the case.

    With a different approach where I rewrote an "unchanged" file somehow (is there a way to do that? would you have to hack the Git client itself, maybe, and hope the remote didn't notice?), then there are policies like receive.denyNonFastForwards to prevent me from doing so. Just because I'm a maintainer doesn't mean I'm administering the server (think GitHub), meaning protections are in place to prevent shit like this.

    At the end of the day I know Git well enough to use it for things I need to do, but I'm not an expert. Am I going down the "wrong" path to achieve the hypothetical outcome? Am I mistaken somewhere? I'm just finding it incredibly iffy as to how one could orchestrate this client-side without it being detected.

    It seems like the easiest thing, assuming one could produce hash collisions like that, would be to fuck with a server, change the files on it with the hash-collisioned evil files, which would appear the same to Git clients, but actually contain code being potentially deployed from the server that is not what it appears to be. People cloning the repo could notice the evil code, but those who are just pulling it wouldn't even see different files locally.

    Thoughts? Sorry for the wall of text vomit, I'm just trying to grok the feasibility.

    4 votes
  13. Comment on Tech salaries are risk premiums in ~tech

    reese
    Link Parent
    Don't you hate that? When you actually do the thing and other people talk about it like they know? That said, I can personally vouch that all the terrible shit people say about Boeing is true—I...

    Don't you hate that? When you actually do the thing and other people talk about it like they know? That said, I can personally vouch that all the terrible shit people say about Boeing is true—I left a couple years ago because of systemic incompetence, outsourcing, viral toxicity, crunch, etc. Now every time I see news about Boeing I feel like I can tell the goddamn future. Leaving there is the best decision I've made as an adult, but at the same time I know there are plenty of great teams at Boeing who are trying to do the right thing, ones that wouldn't be bad to work for today.

    Anyway, I can sort of relate to you, as I'm smelling some pungent /r/cscareerquestions body odor from this thread. I know I'm off-topic, but let me just say this: when I make a claim, I try to elaborate on the experiences I had that led to it, and furthermore emphasize that my anecdotes may not inform a more general set of expectations. I try, and sometimes I fail, but I try. All I ask of others is to consider grounding their claims in experience. There are lurkers who may be forming opinions based on what's discussed here, and making general assertions about companies based on nothing will always be contradicted by people who actually worked at one of them or knows somebody who did/does.

    2 votes
  14. Comment on Iowa Democratic caucus results delayed until Tuesday due to reporting inconsistencies and technical issues with app in ~news

    reese
    Link Parent
    I was just confused because I'm pretty sure the Founding Fathers were open and ambiguous about how and which electors would be appointed, hence why the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact is...

    I was just confused because I'm pretty sure the Founding Fathers were open and ambiguous about how and which electors would be appointed, hence why the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact is constitutional by a strict, originalist reading. And not only were these guys hands-off about how the states could go about their business, but they also baked the amendment process into Article V, because they knew we would need to change things. In short I guess I'm saying that Iowa chooses to have a clusterfuck electoral process despite rational alternatives, so it seems weird to bring the Founding Fathers into this. Maybe I'm misunderstanding something.

    4 votes
  15. Comment on The missing semester of your computer science education in ~comp

    reese
    Link Parent
    I took a course (kind of) like that years ago and it was my favorite one. I learned Linux, C, concurrency, and got my feet wet with Vim (the prof preferred Emacs, but encouraged us to learn...

    I took a course (kind of) like that years ago and it was my favorite one. I learned Linux, C, concurrency, and got my feet wet with Vim (the prof preferred Emacs, but encouraged us to learn whatever text editor we wanted). Now all I do is write concurrent code on Linux with a Vim extension all day, that is when I'm not being an asshole on Tildes. While I haven't touched C in a long time, I had to use a pointer a couple days ago to hack managed data into a job system. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    I understand what you mean about wanting to choose your own tools. I think what made my class work well was that expectations of us were so high on C and Linux that we were forced to learn tertiary subjects ourselves in order to survive. In our exams, for example, we had to write compilable C on paper, shell commands that could produce wanted output (sometimes we got hints on which ones to try), and demonstrate understanding of memory management. All the code we submitted was ran against automated tests, which is surprisingly still not as prevalent as it should be today.

    Now I'm halfway through my master's, and what I'd now like to see is required Git commits throughout a given week, which would disincentive plagiarism even further than having to check in our code occasionally for automated tests, and it would force people who have somehow not used a VCS to get with the fucking program.

    This missing curriculum looks great to me. Sure, it's a little opinionated, but it's incredibly informative at the same time. There's stuff here I'm rusty on, to be candid, so I'm glad OP shared this. I will say that, for many CS students, this truly is a missing curriculum. I've known so many people who entered their software careers not knowing any of this stuff, and holy shit has programming/troubleshooting been difficult for them. I hope resources like this become more popular and don't get hand-waved away with inconsequential and vague criticisms.

    2 votes
  16. Comment on Iowa Democratic caucus results delayed until Tuesday due to reporting inconsistencies and technical issues with app in ~news

    reese
    Link Parent
    Can you clarify what you mean by the system [the founding fathers] set up, specifically with regard to the electoral process?

    We also have a strong reverence for the founding fathers of the country so there is resistance to changing the system they set up.

    Can you clarify what you mean by the system [the founding fathers] set up, specifically with regard to the electoral process?

    1 vote
  17. Comment on Tech salaries are risk premiums in ~tech

    reese
    Link Parent
    Netflix doesn't just hire senior devs. Why else do they have so many internships? Also, I went to college with a guy who was not a senior dev, just starting in his career, and was hired there....

    Netflix only hires senior devs

    Netflix doesn't just hire senior devs. Why else do they have so many internships? Also, I went to college with a guy who was not a senior dev, just starting in his career, and was hired there.

    They literally say you should not expect to work at Netflix your entire career.

    Dude has been at Netflix since like 2013, which is forever by FAANG standards.

    Which is very, very different from Google, Facebook, Apple, and especially Amazon. Where tbh you can coast quite comfortably.

    I've seen people "coast" everywhere I've ever worked, and I've known plenty of people at the listed companies who have not been coasting.

    I wasn't looking to quote everything you said and correct it, because that's my least favorite thing to do and it's generally unproductive, but it's not about you or me. I don't want young and impressionable people to read your post and develop unrealistic expectations of the industry. My point: you will most assuredly not coast at any FAANG company, but you can get hired anywhere you want with sufficient will.

    6 votes
  18. Comment on How do we stop the polarization/toxicity filling the web? in ~tech

    reese
    Link Parent
    Moderation is a boon to freedom of speech. We need decorum online and IRL so we all have a fair and equal chance at being heard. That's why town hall meetings and the like have moderators and...

    Moderation is a boon to freedom of speech. We need decorum online and IRL so we all have a fair and equal chance at being heard. That's why town hall meetings and the like have moderators and security. It's why bars have bouncers. Things we tolerate on the Internet wouldn't last a moment IRL. Consider the conceit everyone rolls their eyes at, or some guy helicoptering his dick at the Super Bowl who has to be chased before millions of onlookers.

    I am for freedom of speech, and I am also for decorum. In any social setting there's context. All of us occasionally miss context by accident or get mad when we shouldn't, but a few of us miss it intentionally to draw attention for personal gain. Should the habitual manipulators and provocateurs among us have the right to a platform? A pulpit? No, they can acquire permission to participate, and if they blow it by acting like complete assholes, sucks for them.

    5 votes
  19. Comment on An impeachment trial without witnesses would be unconstitutional in ~news

    reese
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    Anything that isn't explicitly, meticulously codified with dry and redundant language is prone to McConnellism. That is, after all, what he'll be known for, along with pretty much all of the other...

    Anything that isn't explicitly, meticulously codified with dry and redundant language is prone to McConnellism. That is, after all, what he'll be known for, along with pretty much all of the other Senate Republicans: subverting the spirit of the law and procedural norms. As for this specific case, the Constitution says the following in Article I, Section 3, Clause 6:

    The Senate shall have the sole Power to try all Impeachments. When sitting for that Purpose, they shall be on Oath or Affirmation. When the President of the United States is tried, the Chief Justice shall preside: And no Person shall be convicted without the Concurrence of two thirds of the Members present.

    Try and tried as in trial, contextually established by the fact that the Chief Justice shall preside, and, you know, words like convicted. You don't have to be a lawyer to know what a trial is. But hey, if this is the road we're going down, then I take the Chief Justice to mean Judge Judy. I would consider her the Chief Justice, wouldn't you?

    Edit: Typo.

    3 votes
  20. Comment on I'm planning to enable the "mark new comments" feature for everyone - any major concerns? in ~tildes.official

    reese
    Link
    Just here to dogpile in agreement. I was meh about this feature when it was introduced... and then I turned it on, realizing it differentiated my experience on Tildes versus everywhere else. It's...

    Just here to dogpile in agreement.

    I was meh about this feature when it was introduced... and then I turned it on, realizing it differentiated my experience on Tildes versus everywhere else. It's so useful. As for security, the attack surface is basically the same with or without marking new comments. This should be the default. Opting out takes only a couple clicks, although I wonder how many will.

    4 votes