spit-evil-olive-tips's recent activity

  1. Comment on Weekly coronavirus-related chat, questions, and minor updates - week of July 6 in ~health.coronavirus

    spit-evil-olive-tips
    Link Parent
    Some more college-related news: https://www.ice.gov/news/releases/sevp-modifies-temporary-exemptions-nonimmigrant-students-taking-online-courses-during More shortsighted and coldhearted...

    Some more college-related news:

    https://www.ice.gov/news/releases/sevp-modifies-temporary-exemptions-nonimmigrant-students-taking-online-courses-during

    Nonimmigrant F-1 and M-1 students attending schools operating entirely online may not take a full online course load and remain in the United States. The U.S. Department of State will not issue visas to students enrolled in schools and/or programs that are fully online for the fall semester nor will U.S. Customs and Border Protection permit these students to enter the United States. Active students currently in the United States enrolled in such programs must depart the country or take other measures, such as transferring to a school with in-person instruction to remain in lawful status. If not, they may face immigration consequences including, but not limited to, the initiation of removal proceedings.

    More shortsighted and coldhearted immigration policy from the Trump administration.

    7 votes
  2. Comment on Researchers at Cornell University concluded that an online semester would result in more COVID-19 in ~health.coronavirus

    spit-evil-olive-tips
    Link Parent
    I read the Executive Summary. Since you've read the whole thing, do you think the Executive Summary does a good job or a bad job of summarizing their assumptions and conclusions? If I, as a...

    You can't read a little bit of a research paper and come to a conclusion, especially not starting at the start when papers don't reach the actual valuable information until at least half way through.

    I read the Executive Summary. Since you've read the whole thing, do you think the Executive Summary does a good job or a bad job of summarizing their assumptions and conclusions?

    If I, as a non-epidemiologist Random Internet Person, can find flaws in their assumptions based solely on the description in the executive summary, why exactly should I bother to read the rest of the paper?

    The problem I have is with those assumptions, as stated in their own executive summary. If their starting assumptions are wrong, then it doesn't matter whether the rest of the paper is perfectly correct on the epidemiology and mathematical modeling, or if there's a subtle flaw in paragraph 3 of page 47.

    And as I said, I'm not passing judgement on the paper as a whole...because I know that I'm not an epidemiologist and I'm not qualified to do that. I'm passing judgement on the specific conclusion that the Inside Higher Ed article focused on:

    Researchers at Cornell University have concluded an online semester at the university will result in more COVID-19 infections than an in-person one.

    Do you think that every undergrad at Cornell is going to sit down and read all 54 pages, as you expect me to do? Do you expect an incoming freshman, who just graduated high school and is probably not going to be majoring in epidemiology or public health, to be academically prepared to read this, understand it, and evaluate its veracity?

    I don't. I think they're going to read summaries of the research, like this one in IHE. Which is why it's important to me that those summaries don't overplay the conclusions of the research. The headline, as is typical of "science news" that's based on a single source, strips out all the "well, it depends"es of the research, and presents a rather definitive, nuance-free "will result in more infections" conclusion.

    I find it interesting, although unsurprising, that the typically "trust the science" tildes doesn't even attempt to trust the science when it opposes their general beliefs and biases.

    You know what "trust the science" means to me? I trust peer-reviewed science. If there's a paper in a reputable, peer-reviewed journal about the covid potential from in-person vs online classes, I'd be happy to read through it more deeply.

    Even better if it's from authors without institutional conflicts of interest. I would trust this study a lot more if it was Cornell analyzing the effects of UCLA opening for in-person classes, or Harvard analyzing Cornell holding in-person classes, etc.

    And obviously I'd love to see a peer-reviewed meta-analysis of multiple such peer-reviewed studies, but that certainly isn't going to happen in time to inform the decisions of colleges for this fall.

    Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. "Holding in-person classes is actually safer than online classes" is, in the context of everything I know about covid-19, a rather extraordinary claim. And I don't see extraordinary evidence here. I see a 54 page academic blog post with questionable assumptions starting on page 2. If you want to call that skepticism a "bias", sure, have at it.

    5 votes
  3. Comment on Weekly thread for news/updates/discussion of George Floyd protests, racial injustice, and policing policy - week of June 29 in ~news

    spit-evil-olive-tips
    Link
    Latest from Seattle's "Police Operated Occupation Parcel" (POOP): https://twitter.com/slydesilva/status/1279107834739736576 People walking down the street are being followed by officers, stopped...

    Latest from Seattle's "Police Operated Occupation Parcel" (POOP):

    https://twitter.com/slydesilva/status/1279107834739736576

    People walking down the street are being followed by officers, stopped without probable cause, and asked "papers please". They're required to either show ID or have an officer escort them to their door in order to just get to their apartment.

    2 votes
  4. Discussion thread for Hamilton's streaming/theatrical release

    Warning: this post may contain spoilers

    I may or may not have stayed up all night watching it.

    I'd be interested in knowing what everyone's previous exposure / experience to Hamilton is, before seeing this version of it.

    I've listened to the cast recording a million times, and saw the touring production once when it came to Seattle.

    I'm sure I'll have more cogent thoughts later, after sleeping on it / watching it a second time...one thing I noticed that stuck in my mind is that besides censoring the two "fucks" (previous discussion) they also edited it so that "she led me to her bed / let her legs spread..." wasn't terribly easy to understand if you didn't already know those lyrics.

    14 votes
  5. Comment on Researchers at Cornell University concluded that an online semester would result in more COVID-19 in ~health.coronavirus

    spit-evil-olive-tips
    Link
    Direct link to the paper: https://people.orie.cornell.edu/pfrazier/COVID_19_Modeling_Jun15.pdf Note that this is not published in a peer-reviewed journal of any sort. It's hosted on the website of...

    Direct link to the paper: https://people.orie.cornell.edu/pfrazier/COVID_19_Modeling_Jun15.pdf

    Note that this is not published in a peer-reviewed journal of any sort. It's hosted on the website of some Cornell professor. This is the academia equivalent of a press release.

    To provide context, we also model what would happen if we did not open Cornell for a residential fall semester and did full virtual instruction instead.

    Our nominal parameters assume that 9000 students would remain in Ithaca but outside the control of the University in off-campus apartments without asymptomatic surveillance, and that a population of 15000 faculty, staff, and graduate students would remain on campus with asymptomatic surveillance.

    There are 5 PhD students and 3 faculty members listed as authors. Whose ass were these "nominal parameters" pulled out of?

    This "asymptomatic surveillance" turns out to be the key idea they have.

    Now, what do they mean by "surveillance", exactly...?

    Also, we hypothesize that testing everyone on a deterministic schedule (each person is tested once every 5 days) will outperform testing randomly, though our model assumes random testing to simplify computation.

    OK, so it takes 3 professors and 5 PhD students to conclude that if you institute a surveillance regime where you test everyone every 5 days, you will have fewer covid cases than if you didn't test everyone every 5 days.

    They've contrived two scenarios, one where people are on-campus and submitting to 6 nose swabs every month, and one where they're distance learning and not getting tested at all. Shockingly, contrived scenario #1 has fewer covid cases than contrived scenario #2...because yeah, if you look at a population in isolation and assume frequent testing of that population, that's the result you're going to get.

    our nominal scenario for residential instruction assumes full compliance with testing quarantine and isolation.

    Aww, that's cute. They think a bunch of 18-22 year olds, after spending an entire summer under quarantine, will head off to college and maintain perfect discipline.

    I haven't read all 54 pages of this paper, but I've read enough to convince me that the conclusion this article tries to draw from it is horseshit.

    15 votes
  6. Comment on What's a dish you've made that you're most proud of? in ~food

    spit-evil-olive-tips
    Link Parent
    You have changed my life. I'm not sure if it's for the better or for the worse, but you've definitely changed it. Can I add "beef jerky dipped in Nutella" to the list?

    General Tsos Mac and Cheese. Box of Mac, add leftover General Tsos.

    You have changed my life.

    I'm not sure if it's for the better or for the worse, but you've definitely changed it.

    Can I add "beef jerky dipped in Nutella" to the list?

    4 votes
  7. Comment on Weekly thread for news/updates/discussion of George Floyd protests, racial injustice, and policing policy - week of June 29 in ~news

    spit-evil-olive-tips
    Link
    Massachusetts detective fired after post supporting Black Lives Matter Strange how hard it is to get fired as a police officer even for committing murder, assault, rape or theft, but very easy to...

    Massachusetts detective fired after post supporting Black Lives Matter

    Strange how hard it is to get fired as a police officer even for committing murder, assault, rape or theft, but very easy to get fired for an unpopular political view.

    Also, similar to the NRA's silence on the killing of Philando Castile (who had a lawfully-carried firearm that he proactively informed officers about) I'm expecting deafening silence from the "free speech is under attack!!!" conservatives about a police officer getting fired from their job for controversial but constitutionally protected speech.

    3 votes
  8. Comment on Weekly thread for news/updates/discussion of George Floyd protests, racial injustice, and policing policy - week of June 29 in ~news

    spit-evil-olive-tips
    Link
    June 5: Seattle police officers will stop using tear gas on protesters for at least the next 30 days June 7: SPD uses tear gas anyway June 12: Judge orders Seattle police to stop using tear gas...

    June 5: Seattle police officers will stop using tear gas on protesters for at least the next 30 days

    June 7: SPD uses tear gas anyway

    Seattle police announced their justification for breaking the supposed ban in a tweet at 12:18 a.m. Monday: “Officers are taking heavy projectiles, coming from the crowd,” said a post from the department’s official Twitter account. “A male, armed with a gun, is in the intersection of 11th and Pine ST. CS gas has been authorized.”

    Some protesters and elected officials have since disputed the police account, and at least one of the city’s police watchdog groups said it understood the SWAT exception only would apply to standoff and hostage situations — not to demonstrations.

    “That was our understanding, no tear gas for crowd control for any reasons, not even by SWAT,” said Jesse Franz, spokesman for the Community Police Commission. “I think it’s pretty clear that the spirit of our recommendations hasn’t been met.”

    June 12: Judge orders Seattle police to stop using tear gas and pepper spray at protests

    U.S. District Judge Richard Jones issued the two-week order

    June 15: Seattle City Council bans police use of tear gas and chokeholds as protests for Black lives continue

    Under the city’s regular process for adopted bills, Sawant’s laws should take effect sometime next month.

    (digging into the actual bill, our chickenshit mayor returned it unsigned because she didn't have the courage of her convictions to veto it and have the council override her veto, which means it'll take effect July 26th)

    That means there's an exactly one-month window, from the expiration of the federal court order on June 26 to the Seattle law taking effect July 26th, where SPD is still legally allowed to use tear gas and pepper spray.

    You'll never guess what they did last night...

    Police deployed blast balls and pepper spray while attempting to make arrests after individuals in the crowd began throwing bottles at officers.

    9 votes
  9. Comment on Weekly thread for news/updates/discussion of George Floyd protests, racial injustice, and policing policy - week of June 29 in ~news

    spit-evil-olive-tips
    Link Parent
    Seattle PD will never change... Using the tried-and-true "knee on the neck" while arresting someone on Capitol Hill Omari Salisbury, who's been doing excellent reporting throughout these protests:...
    7 votes
  10. Comment on Weekly thread for news/updates/discussion of George Floyd protests, racial injustice, and policing policy - week of June 29 in ~news

    spit-evil-olive-tips
    Link
    Iowa: SUV carrying the state governor, driven by someone from the State Patrol, runs into protesters Official police version of events: Looking forward to video of what actually happened.

    Iowa: SUV carrying the state governor, driven by someone from the State Patrol, runs into protesters

    Official police version of events:

    As the vehicle began to turn away from the protestor and onto the roadway, the demonstrator intentionally stepped in front of the slowly moving vehicle.

    Looking forward to video of what actually happened.

    4 votes
  11. Comment on "The protests began in the small province of Minnesota" - Thai Enquirer explain colonialist reporting in a few paragraphs in ~misc

    spit-evil-olive-tips
    Link Parent
    There's a series from Slate called If It Happened There that all followed this style. They haven't written new ones in several years, which is tragic because they're some of the funniest things...

    There's a series from Slate called If It Happened There that all followed this style. They haven't written new ones in several years, which is tragic because they're some of the funniest things I've ever read.

    A few of my favorite ones:

    4 votes