spit-evil-olive-tips's recent activity

  1. Comment on New Wi-Fi 6 Certification is Officially Released, Up to 3x Faster Than 802.11ac in ~tech

    spit-evil-olive-tips
    Link
    TP-Link's page on it has some approachable infographics on the new features: https://www.tp-link.com/us/wifi6/ Digging into technical details, there's the Wikipedia page on 802.11ax. Notable...

    TP-Link's page on it has some approachable infographics on the new features: https://www.tp-link.com/us/wifi6/

    Digging into technical details, there's the Wikipedia page on 802.11ax. Notable things that stand out to me:

    • Uses the same 2.4ghz / 5ghz spectrum as current wifi, but is future-proofed to support other bands from 1 to 7 ghz when licenses become available.

    • WPA3 (which is technically its own standard, so can be implemented on 802.11ac devices, but it's required by 802.11ax) will be a huge improvement to wireless security. Right now, if you have an "open" wireless network, there's no encryption at all of the traffic between clients and the access point. WPA3 adds "Opportunistic Wireless Encryption" which allows both endpoints, if they support it, to encrypt traffic even with an unauthenticated access point.

    • Another change in WPA3 is that for Personal / pre-shared key networks (aka just about every home network out there) the initial negotiation has been updated to use SAE which includes a Diffie-Hellman key exchange. Right now with WPA2 there's a theoretical attack which would involve an attacker passively intercepting a lot of your encrypted traffic then running an offline attack to try to recover your pre-shared key.

    • Target Wake Time looks interesting - seems like it would have the most benefit for IoT devices, phones not actively being used, etc. Allows the AP and the client to agree that the client needs to wake up less frequently in order to participate in the network, which could help improve battery life significantly.

    4 votes
  2. Comment on Programming Q&A Thread in ~comp

    spit-evil-olive-tips
    Link Parent
    This will help, but not in the way you're thinking of. The first app you write using any given library/framework, you'll still be learning the way that library author intended apps to be written...

    write say ten basic apps to completion with various libraries

    This will help, but not in the way you're thinking of.

    The first app you write using any given library/framework, you'll still be learning the way that library author intended apps to be written using their framework. So writing a single app with a new framework will help you learn to navigate framework documentation and extract from it "what is the author trying to tell me about how they think I should write this app?" but it won't necessarily help you learn "good design" in general (whatever that means).

    Where learning multiple frameworks may help you is to learn some of the underlying patterns that many different frameworks use, such as GUI apps and MVC.

    A more general thing I'd recommend is to read AOSA which has real-world examples of design & architecture.

    a good plan which helps me not get stuck as I go further when writing code

    Be careful of analysis paralysis - hitting a point where you think adding more code will complicate your design too much, so you avoid it entirely and focus on trying to improve the design instead.

    Just Do It tm. Overcomplicate the design. Write crappy code, even when there's alarm bells going off in your head of "wow, this is ugly".

    Next, get in the habit of writing automated tests for your apps or libraries, as you go. "Do test-driven development" is a cliche, and it's not a panacea, but it will definitely help. Testable code is always better designed than non-testable code. For example, your app wants to write to a database, it's tempting to just hardcode the database path / credentials. When you want to write automated tests for it, you realize it's much better to have some sort of "here's a connection string, please initialize me a database connection" method.

    Having good test coverage will also help give you confidence in refactoring your app to improve its design incrementally. There's a quote in the military that "no battle plan ever survives contact with the enemy". The developer version of that is "no design ever survives contact with writing code". No matter how much design you do up-front, as you go, you'll realize parts of it are unrealistic or poorly thought-out. Tests give you the ability to incrementally change the design as you go.

    I'd also recommend this series of talks given at Google. It's focused on Java, but squint and ignore that, it's really about testability through dependency injection and inversion of control, which are very important things as you start thinking about design at larger scales, with multiple people or teams contributing components to an app or service.

    7 votes
  3. Comment on Richard Stallman resigns as president of the Free Software Foundation, and from his position at MIT in ~tech

    spit-evil-olive-tips
    Link Parent
    Short answer: it shouldn't matter, at all. We should not let someone's internal mental state, up to and including mental illness or disorder, affect our judgement of their external behavior. Now,...

    how should we approach people that have autism or other anti-social-personality disorders in positions of power?

    Short answer: it shouldn't matter, at all. We should not let someone's internal mental state, up to and including mental illness or disorder, affect our judgement of their external behavior.

    Now, when I phrase it that way, I'm sure it sounds overly harsh, so the long answer:

    Harvey Weinstein went through treatment for sex addiction. Kevin Spacey did the same.

    There's some interesting discussion in those links about whether "sex addiction" should be an actual disorder classified under the DSM or if it should be a different diagnosis. Set that aside for now. Suppose, hypothetically, that both Weinstein and Spacey were diagnosed with a DSM-recognized mental disorder, by a fully-trained and qualified psychologist, and then they went to a rehab or therapy facility that was fully-licensed and accredited.

    Even then...that wouldn't be an excuse for their behavior, or justification for them to come back into the public spotlight and expect to have the public forgive & accept them.

    In particular, I've read arguments along the lines of "we shouldn't demonize Harvey Weinstein, because he's a sex addict and there's already too much stigma about mental health problems". Anyone defending someone like Weinstein with an argument like that can fuck all of the way off. Ditto with Kevin Spacey coming out as gay and then defenders of him trying to play a "don't be homophobic" card.

    Bringing this back to Stallman, who's said he believes he has a "shadow" version of Asperger's / autism spectrum disorder:

    "I wonder about it, but that's as far as it goes," he said. "Now, it's clear I do not have [Asperger's] -- I don't have most of the characteristics of that. For instance, one of those characteristics is having trouble with rhythm. I love the most complicated, fascinating rhythms." But Stallman did acknowledge that he has "a few of the characteristics" and that he "might have what some people call a 'shadow' version of it."

    We absolutely should not have a standard of "Stallman's kind of an asshole, but he's probably on the autism spectrum, so he may not know any better, and so to tread lightly around mental health issues we should excuse behavior by him that we would judge more harshly if we thought he was neurotypical". This is sometimes called a "no brilliant jerks" rule, though usually without discussion of autism spectrum or related disorders mixed in.

    Where diagnoses of autism spectrum disorder or related conditions should matter, is if Stallman chooses to go to therapy or some other form of treatment, it might be relevant between him and his healthcare provider, as a way of understanding why his brain works the way it does, relative to the brains of people around him. That might help Stallman understand why an email that seemed so innocuous in his mind could be received so poorly by so many other people, and lead to such negative consequences.

    24 votes
  4. Comment on Remove Richard Stallman in ~tech

    spit-evil-olive-tips
    Link Parent
    Yep, sounds about right. A classic "I'm sorry you're so easily offended" type of apology. "A series of misunderstandings and mischaracterizations" puts the entire blame for the situation on other...

    I am doing this due to pressure on MIT and me over a series of misunderstandings and mischaracterizations.

    Yep, sounds about right. A classic "I'm sorry you're so easily offended" type of apology.

    "A series of misunderstandings and mischaracterizations" puts the entire blame for the situation on other people. RMS seems determined to not learn anything, admit he was wrong in any way, or change anything. The entire situation was caused by other people misunderstanding and mischaracterizing what he said (which of course, was nothing more than a statement of "facts and logic").

    8 votes
  5. Comment on Is there a way to see what the different colours of comments mean? in ~tildes

    spit-evil-olive-tips
    Link Parent
    Are any of the colors theme-dependent? I'm on the default theme and I see linked comments with a yellow border instead of brown.

    Are any of the colors theme-dependent? I'm on the default theme and I see linked comments with a yellow border instead of brown.

    2 votes
  6. Comment on What’s the status on anonymous comments? in ~tildes

    spit-evil-olive-tips
    Link Parent
    Remember that Tildes is still invite-only. Just making it "anyone can sign up, no invite required" is a huge step that we're not ready for at the moment. Making it "anyone can post without even...

    Remember that Tildes is still invite-only. Just making it "anyone can sign up, no invite required" is a huge step that we're not ready for at the moment.

    Making it "anyone can post without even signing up" would be another big step beyond that, and not one I'm convinced would be worth doing, at any point. A huge part of why I'm here and why I believe Tildes will succeed is the trust/reputation system, and 4chan-style truly anonymous posting would undermine that significantly.

    8 votes
  7. Comment on Remove Richard Stallman in ~tech

    spit-evil-olive-tips
    Link Parent
    I think this is the heart of the problem - it's both an umbrella term, and (in some jurisdictions) a crime with a specific definition. If I steal something, the specific crime I get charged with...

    My understanding is that sexual assault is a sort of 'umbrella term' that includes many things, rape being one of them.

    I think this is the heart of the problem - it's both an umbrella term, and (in some jurisdictions) a crime with a specific definition.

    If I steal something, the specific crime I get charged with might be robbery, burglary, larceny, embezzlement, and so on, each of which has a specific definition. And yet "stealing" or "theft" are umbrella terms that are accepted for describing all those specific crimes.

    If there's a news story about me stealing a car, no one's going to play "actually, it's grand theft auto..." games.

    The closest umbrella term we have that I'm aware of (and that doesn't overlap with any existing definitions of specific crimes) is sexual "misbehavior" or "impropriety". The problem with those is that they can easily be interpreted as diminishing the severity by lumping major crimes such as rape into "misbehavior".

    7 votes
  8. Comment on What’s the status on anonymous comments? in ~tildes

    spit-evil-olive-tips
    Link Parent
    I assume it would still require the user to be logged in, but with a "post anonymously" checkbox that would simply not display their username, and hide that comment from the user's "recent...

    I assume it would still require the user to be logged in, but with a "post anonymously" checkbox that would simply not display their username, and hide that comment from the user's "recent comments" page. Deimos would still be able to see who posted it for the purposes of spam or trolling comments, and presumably that comment would still factor in to the user's overall trust score (ie, posting Noise comments anonymously would not be a loophole to escape those comments affecting your "karma").

    If it were implemented, I would like to see it site-wide, rather than only if the creator of a topic opted-in to it. (though maybe the creator of a topic could have an option to force anonymous posting on every comment in that thread?)

    Another consideration is if you'd want identities associated with anonymous posters, within a thread:

    User A, posting anonymously

    User B, posting non-anonymously

    User C, posting anonymously where it isn't clear if they're User A responding to B, or User C entering the conversation

    You could perhaps display User A as "anonymous poster #1" in that thread, which would allow for anonymized conversations to take place (since User C's comment would get labeled "anonymous poster #2").

    9 votes