spit-evil-olive-tips's recent activity

  1. Comment on Looking for free online document collaboration tools for academics in ~tech

    spit-evil-olive-tips Link
    When you say cloud-based, are you thinking of something hosted by someone else, or that you can host yourself in some cloud somewhere? If the former, are you expecting it to be free, or are you...

    When you say cloud-based, are you thinking of something hosted by someone else, or that you can host yourself in some cloud somewhere?

    If the former, are you expecting it to be free, or are you willing to pay for it? If so, how much?

    If you're open to running it yourself, read through the awesome-selfhosted list for ideas.

    2 votes
  2. Comment on Amber Brown at Python Language Summit: Batteries Included, But They're Leaking in ~comp

    spit-evil-olive-tips Link
    I definitely agree with her on this: For example, the stdlib datetime module is terrible for dealing with any real-world data, particularly anything timezone-aware (a separate talk at this same...

    I definitely agree with her on this:

    Some ecosystems such as Javascript rely too much on packages, she conceded, but there are others like Rust that have small standard libraries and high-quality package repositories. She thinks that Python should move farther in that direction.

    For example, the stdlib datetime module is terrible for dealing with any real-world data, particularly anything timezone-aware (a separate talk at this same summit covered the desire to bring timezones into the stdlib) so the standard advice is to install something like Pendulum. Either the stdlib should have something as high-quality as Pendulum, or datetime handling should be punted entirely from the stdlib.

    However, the part that immediately precedes that I completely disagree with:

    Brown said her point was to move asyncio to PyPI, along with most new feature development.

    async and await are part of the Python language, so the asyncio module needs to be as well. I think her position as a Twisted maintainer is biasing her here. asyncio is the future. Libraries like Twisted and gevent each implementing their own asynchronous I/O and creating a completely fragmented ecosystem is the past.

    Although Python 2 is nearly at its end of life, this only holds for the core developers, according to Brown, and for users, Red Hat and other distributors will keep Python 2 alive “until the goddam end of time.”

    ...

    Van Rossum argued instead that if the Twisted team wants the ecosystem to evolve, they should stop supporting older Python versions and force users to upgrade. Brown acknowledged this point, but said half of Twisted users are still on Python 2 and it is difficult to abandon them. The debate at this point became personal for Van Rossum, and he left angrily.

    Yes, let Python 2 die. Red Hat is going to keep supporting it for as long as people will pay for it, but that doesn't mean libraries maintained by volunteers should feel obligated to do the same.

    5 votes
  3. Comment on The Voynich Manuscript may have successfully been decoded in ~humanities

  4. Comment on Should a Colorado library publish local news? in ~news

    spit-evil-olive-tips Link
    One of the rare exceptions to Betteridge's law, IMO. The parallel I'm reminded of is the push to have the Post Office also provide banking services. In both cases, there's a government institution...

    Should a Colorado library publish local news?

    One of the rare exceptions to Betteridge's law, IMO.

    The parallel I'm reminded of is the push to have the Post Office also provide banking services. In both cases, there's a government institution with a fairly cookie-cutter shape & structure, and a desire to have it keep up with more modern demands that aren't adequately filled by the private sector.

    3 votes
  5. Comment on Alabama Senate passes nation’s most restrictive abortion ban, which makes no exceptions for victims of rape and incest in ~news

    spit-evil-olive-tips Link Parent
    It depends heavily on how narrow or broad the eventual Supreme Court ruling will be. The short version is that it's quite unlikely we'll get a broad ruling striking down not just abortion rights...

    It depends heavily on how narrow or broad the eventual Supreme Court ruling will be. The short version is that it's quite unlikely we'll get a broad ruling striking down not just abortion rights but also other things that fall under the general "right to privacy".

    "Overturning Roe v. Wade" is just a sort of shorthand for the worst-case scenario many reproductive rights activists fear. It's extremely unlikely that abortion would be criminalized at the federal level - rather, it would become legal for state-by-state bans or restrictions on abortion.

    Also important to note is that Roe v. Wade is the name that everyone knows, but in many ways the more relevant case is 1992's Planned Parenthood vs. Casey. This created an undue burden standard which does allow states to regulate abortion as long as it does not pose an "undue burden" on the mother. There was a recent case on this same subject in 2016, Whole Women's Health v. Hellerstedt. That case revolved around the undue burden standard and how it applied to regulations that states wanted to apply to abortion clinics.

    So it's entirely possible to have a fairly narrow ruling which doesn't officially strike down Roe, but has much the same effect by allowing a much larger set of restrictions on abortion that aren't deemed to create an "undue burden". The current "state of the art", if you will, among state legislatures that wish to restrict abortion is to try to shut down abortion clinics through what are called TRAP laws. If abortion is technically legal in a state, but due to regulations there are no clinics in that state performing abortions, then it's effectively the same thing.

    All of the above can be done without upending the larger right to privacy recognized in the Constitution (famously described as being part of the "penumbra" recognized by other rights, rather than explicitly spelled out). In general, and especially under the Roberts Court, justices tend to go for narrower rulings over broad ones.

    11 votes
  6. Comment on The OnePlus 7 Pro has a 90Hz screen, three cameras, and costs $669 in ~tech

    spit-evil-olive-tips Link Parent
    The unrivaled champion of camera count, as far as I know, is still Amazon's ill-fated Kindle Fire Phone, which had six cameras total - the usual pair of front & rear facing for picture-taking and...

    The unrivaled champion of camera count, as far as I know, is still Amazon's ill-fated Kindle Fire Phone, which had six cameras total - the usual pair of front & rear facing for picture-taking and then 4 extra cameras around the corners of the screen to track the user's head and allow for a 3D perspective and other gimmicks.

    1 vote
  7. Comment on Woman shot and killed outside her apartment complex by officer in Baytown, Texas in ~news

  8. Comment on New York Regulator Launches Investigation Into TurboTax Maker Intuit and H&R Block in ~news

  9. Comment on Facing criticism, CMPD defends release of shorter video from police shooting in ~news

    spit-evil-olive-tips Link Parent
    Here's the bodycam video, slowed down: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KavcyH_8bS0 He's putting the gun down, as they told him to, when he's shot.

    He wasn't doing what they asked. They asked him to drop it, but he didn't.

    Here's the bodycam video, slowed down: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KavcyH_8bS0

    He's putting the gun down, as they told him to, when he's shot.

    5 votes