vivaria's recent activity

  1. Comment on What's Wrong with the Tech Interview Process? in ~tech

    vivaria
    Link Parent
    The weird bit is, my major is electrical engineering and my background is more in signal processing and data analysis. I've never had to take a data structures/algorithms course... it only comes...

    The weird bit is, my major is electrical engineering and my background is more in signal processing and data analysis. I've never had to take a data structures/algorithms course... it only comes up because my work is software-adjacent, so I come across loads of software-ish advice on the web. I more use programming as a tool to apply ECE theory (e.g. MATLAB, R... I've only just branched out into Python this year), rather than it being the whole shebang.

    I'm not sure if the kind of roles I'd have or the companies I'd apply to even expect me to have that knowledge.

  2. Comment on What are some basic excercises for keeping my midsection toned up? in ~health

    vivaria
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    FWIW, I'm 24, and my body fits that description too. Stick-thin arms and legs, lovehandles, and a tum. My outlook is... we're normal? Bodies are diverse, but the ones we see in media aren't. So,...

    FWIW, I'm 24, and my body fits that description too. Stick-thin arms and legs, lovehandles, and a tum. My outlook is... we're normal? Bodies are diverse, but the ones we see in media aren't. So, it's easy to think there's something wrong with how we're shaped.

    I grew up on the internet, with /fa/ (a 4chan fashion board) telling me I fit a body stereotype called "skinnyfat" (feel free to google that one). It just doesn't work like that, though. Body shapes can't be simplified and categorized in that way. /r/normalnudes (NSFW) helped me realize that, even with its upvote bias towards conventionally attractive women.

    6 votes
  3. Comment on Seth Vargo, the author of Chef Sugar, dicscovered that ICE was using his code, so he pulled it from GitHub in ~comp

    vivaria
    Link Parent
    I'm not sure... but that is an interesting distinction! (hosting vs. licensing) You could say that the author's decision to remove their code from GitHub is unrelated to the license itself, then?...

    I'm not sure... but that is an interesting distinction! (hosting vs. licensing)

    You could say that the author's decision to remove their code from GitHub is unrelated to the license itself, then?

    EDIT: That's exactly what @pallas is saying, too. Just saw their comment.

    5 votes
  4. Comment on Seth Vargo, the author of Chef Sugar, dicscovered that ICE was using his code, so he pulled it from GitHub in ~comp

    vivaria
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    IANAL disclaimer, but I was under the impression that open-source wasn't just a philosophy, but a set of legal definitions, too. I agree with the spirit of what you're saying (see my comment...

    IANAL disclaimer, but I was under the impression that open-source wasn't just a philosophy, but a set of legal definitions, too. I agree with the spirit of what you're saying (see my comment below) but was worried the nitty-gritty legal bits are different when it comes to licensing (as opposed to community-building).

    For context, when I replied to @skybrian, I was focused on the fact they said "should find a new name and new licenses for what they're doing." I understood them as saying "well, the spirit of this action isn't in line with the implications of the open-source license they chose... something more appropriate is needed to allow for this sort of thing." I don't think they were making a value judgment, though.

    A page like https://choosealicense.com/licenses/, for example, doesn't really cover cases where squishy terms like 'evil' are involved.

    5 votes
  5. Comment on What's Wrong with the Tech Interview Process? in ~tech

    vivaria
    Link
    This has been on my mind! I'm in my last year of uni, and trying to decide whether to go straight into industry or pursue a master's. Along with this comes a number of pressures for how to spend...

    This has been on my mind! I'm in my last year of uni, and trying to decide whether to go straight into industry or pursue a master's. Along with this comes a number of pressures for how to spend my time over the next year. Depending on which path I choose, there might be different expectations during an interview process. The weirdness described by the article contributes to a lot of my anxiety... I have all sorts of questions going through my head. Even though I'm in classes, with all of the obligations that come with that, I think things like:

    Do I work on my social skills as an autistic+anxious person? Do I practice interviewing, and preparing answers to behavioral questions? Do I work on feeling comfortable so that I can chat casually without 'being in my own head' during interviews? Do I look at "Cracking the Code Interview"-style algorithms+data structures questions? Do I pursue personal projects? If so, what theory should they cover? What tools should I get practice with? I have a mandatory 4-month work term that I need to fulfill before I can graduate -- should I focus on getting a good internship and use that to pivot instead? How much is even expected of undergraduates when hiring for internships/co-op work terms? Is my resume/background good enough already? Maybe I should be networking instead to bypass this process entirely?

    The worst bit is, I find all of the above terribly unhealthy to be concerned about. This feeling of not being prepared enough has an effect on how I view myself, but I don't want my self-worth to come from my career. I don't want my life to revolve around 'professional development'. Fuck the capitalist idea that my time outside of work should be spent increasing my own value so I can be more productive for someone else's gain.

    My goals in life are completely unrelated to work, and the things I value are so much human. I'd love to feel like I no longer have to spend my free time working, and to instead pursue things like meeting new people or making a sense of home. The ambiguity of the tech interview process messes with all of that. I feel a constant guilt when I spent a weekend doing personal things, as though I'm torpedo'ing my own safety, security, and potential. :(

    8 votes
  6. Comment on Seth Vargo, the author of Chef Sugar, dicscovered that ICE was using his code, so he pulled it from GitHub in ~comp

    vivaria
    Link Parent
    It's tough... how does someone define a licensing scheme that allows them to take action against 'evil' (as the dev puts it) while still allowing free use in most cases? I'm sort of reminded of...

    It's tough... how does someone define a licensing scheme that allows them to take action against 'evil' (as the dev puts it) while still allowing free use in most cases?

    I'm sort of reminded of Tildes' approach to the whole 'free speech' issue. Both it and this story involve intentionally ill-defined "at my discretion" type decisions when it comes to bad actors (because defining things rigidly causes a whole host of other problems). It works for Tildes because it's a self-contained community, but open-source software is... well, the opposite of contained. Squishy, ill-defined licenses seem tougher to realize here.

    7 votes
  7. Comment on The Guardian's ranking of the 100 best books of the 21st century in ~books

    vivaria
    Link Parent
    I was curious about this, because I had never heard of this book, and the link in the Guardian article doesn't really offer criticism of Tess of the D'Urbervilles. Here's an alternate link if...

    Tess of the D’Urbervilles

    I was curious about this, because I had never heard of this book, and the link in the Guardian article doesn't really offer criticism of Tess of the D'Urbervilles. Here's an alternate link if anyone was curious: https://crossref-it.info/textguide/tess-of-the-durbervilles/11/1288 . I liked the prompts it gives to get you thinking.

    3 votes
  8. Comment on "What is the difference between a pixel and a voxel?" | Pixels and voxels, the long answer in ~games.game_design

    vivaria
    Link
    After seeing the other current post on Cube World, and not knowing what a voxel was, I decided to do some digging. I found this post which was delightfully informative and in-depth, and thought...

    After seeing the other current post on Cube World, and not knowing what a voxel was, I decided to do some digging. I found this post which was delightfully informative and in-depth, and thought I'd share it here.

    4 votes
  9. Comment on What have you been watching / reading this week? (Anime/Manga) in ~anime

    vivaria
    Link Parent
    This is very much a 'problematic fave' but the things it gets right, it gets so goddamn right. I've been debating a rewatch too... I was going to wait until S2, but with the KyoAni fire and having...

    This is very much a 'problematic fave' but the things it gets right, it gets so goddamn right. I've been debating a rewatch too... I was going to wait until S2, but with the KyoAni fire and having lost the director (;_;)... I don't want to hold out hope, and might just dig in again.

    2 votes
  10. Comment on Joel Spolsky and Clive Thompson discuss the past, present, and future of coding in ~comp

    vivaria
    Link Parent
    oh hey! off-topic a bit, but, you work with computer vision too? if you feel like it, i'd love to chat with you about that.

    oh hey! off-topic a bit, but, you work with computer vision too? if you feel like it, i'd love to chat with you about that.

    1 vote
  11. Comment on Humble Builder Bundle - featuring Portal Knights, Bridge Constructor Portal, and others in ~games

    vivaria
    Link Parent
    Oh nooooo you've namedropped my favorite game series of all time, now I have to look into this.

    The Incredible Machine

    Oh nooooo you've namedropped my favorite game series of all time, now I have to look into this.

    2 votes
  12. Comment on What are you doing this week? in ~talk

    vivaria
    Link
    I made a new friend last week, and we've been chatting through text since then. My first impressions of her are very positive! She's got interesting tastes, and I'm curious to learn more about...

    I made a new friend last week, and we've been chatting through text since then. My first impressions of her are very positive! She's got interesting tastes, and I'm curious to learn more about her. We're meeting up for drinks (of the coffee/cocoa kind) tomorrow just to chat and study together and I'm nervous. My ability to function in bar/cafe settings varies... some days I can chat just fine, and other days I get so self-conscious and uncomfortable. I get so in my head about what I'm saying and how I'm saying it, and how I look, and my mannerisms. It can get to the point where I feel trapped. Being seen by others can feel claustrophobic. Sometimes I end up shutting down and becoming nonverbal. I hope that doesn't happen with her. I want her to be someone I can feel comfortable around.

    Navigating the early stages of friendships can be anxiety-inducing for me, too. Figuring out boundaries, gauging how free both people are, and what's an acceptable amount to talk and message and hang out. Figuring out how much to share and when not to overshare. I'm also not sure how to tell if she's flirting with me, or if she's just friendly and complimentary. I'd be happy with either a friendship or a relationship... both are equally important to me, so it's not like I have a desire to push a friendship in a certain direction. But I don't want to misread things and make her uncomfortable.

    I do hope we can stay friends throughout autumn, though. It seems she's a festive person too, and someone who likes cozy things and storms. So, we might be able to plan some harvest-y halloween-y activities around town. This is very much my favorite time of the year.

    6 votes
  13. Comment on Richard Stallman resigns as president of the Free Software Foundation, and from his position at MIT in ~tech

    vivaria
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    It can be both at once, though, right? RMS could theoretically have autism but decline to explore it further due to the insulation he gets from his status. (Hypothetical only, though. Just...

    It can be both at once, though, right? RMS could theoretically have autism but decline to explore it further due to the insulation he gets from his status. (Hypothetical only, though. Just spitballing here.)

    And, I thought @tessaractcat was more trying to start a general discussion around a particular excuse given by some of his defenders (rather than saying it was the primary reason). I do think it's a useful discussion, particularly because it gave you a chance to ask questions like this:

    What do you think we can do to stop it other than call him out for being shitty and demand he resign from his positions of power in order to reduce the influence of his shittiness?

    I think, with regards to autism in particular, it could be useful to... (oh god another one of vivaria's bullet-point lists)

    • Change the public discussion around mental health / therapy to normalize and encourage seeking help with hurtful behaviors (while still not demonizing behaviors that hurt no one).
    • Lessen the stigma around diagnoses to help people feel less afraid of learning more about themselves (regardless of what that may uncover). Stop treating autism as something entirely problematic which needs to be cured.
    • Have more nuanced conversations about what it feels like to be autistic so conversations don't immediately jump to black/white depictions.

    Regardless of whether RMS is actually autistic (this situation is way too complicated to even pin that down as a reason)... I still like these steps as ways for preventing Future Stallmans who may have social difficulties.

    10 votes
  14. Comment on Remove Richard Stallman in ~tech

    vivaria
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    People rarely act "irrationally" -- they act according to their understanding of (and outlook towards) the world. They'll have their reasons! If someone's behavior seems irrational to you, though,...

    Extending all that, or the said e-mail itself into all this is irrational.

    People rarely act "irrationally" -- they act according to their understanding of (and outlook towards) the world. They'll have their reasons! If someone's behavior seems irrational to you, though, it usually means there's something about their perspective or circumstances or reasoning that you're missing. Typically, the remedy for that is to ask more questions and listen with curiosity, which helps bridge the gap.

    I believe that the email alone creates an unwelcoming/hostile atmosphere, and that RMS is unfit for his position based on the above bullet point list. I believe that your comments create an unwelcoming atmosphere on Tildes, too. That's my perspective, and if you want to learn more, I'm happy to answer questions about my reasons. If you're going to reduce what I believe down to irrationality, though, then there's not much more I can say that will make a difference.

    3 votes
  15. Comment on Richard Stallman resigns as president of the Free Software Foundation, and from his position at MIT in ~tech

    vivaria
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    Anecdotal, but, I have an Autism Spectrum Disorder diagnosis. I used to do most/all of the awful things I outlined in my other comment. I'm still unlearning a lot of these patterns... I'm not done...

    Anecdotal, but, I have an Autism Spectrum Disorder diagnosis. I used to do most/all of the awful things I outlined in my other comment. I'm still unlearning a lot of these patterns... I'm not done by any means. Really, though, introspection and therapy and self-motivated efforts to change really can help re: social skills.

    There are seemingly conflicting ideas with here with regards to neurodivergence/neurodiversity. Currently, the idea that autistic traits/behaviors are inherently negative is being challenged. The idea of 'normal' itself is being challenged, even. "Autistic people shouldn't feel pressure to warp themselves to a narrow idea of 'normal'. The rest of us should make efforts to broaden ideas of what 'normal' can be, instead."

    I think that has its limits, though. Typical autistic traits vary in how they affect others. Some are harmless, some can act as helpful coping mechanisms, and some are genuinely advantageous and can be a real boon in life. But, others can cause harm towards others, and excusing those sorts of actions goes too far to me. Someone's mental state shouldn't absolve them of the responsibility of their actions.

    Drawing the line between types of behaviors, though, is... a futile effort, I think? It's really a case-by-case basis sort of thing, and requires exploring each situation with nuance and care. It's hard, though. It's tempting to see it as a black and white situation, and to use one type of behavior to characterize autism as a whole. Fighting that urge to simplify things is good, I think.

    15 votes
  16. Comment on Remove Richard Stallman in ~tech

    vivaria
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    Here is a short list of things represented in RMS' actions that struck a nerve: Discussing a serious, painful situation using nonchalant and insensitive language. Not acknowledging (and outright...

    Here is a short list of things represented in RMS' actions that struck a nerve:

    • Discussing a serious, painful situation using nonchalant and insensitive language. Not acknowledging (and outright minimizing) the gravity of the situation by not treading with care and tact.
    • Allocating way too much focus towards protecting the accused, as opposed to empathizing with and trying to understand the experiences of the people who were hurt. (The "nitpick", as you put it, doesn't exist a vacuum. It says "this nitpick is my priority here, rather than any other aspect of the situation.")
    • Playing into tropes which shift blame to victims, and put them at risk by planting seeds of skepticism. ("the most plausible scenario is that she presented herself to him as entirely willing.")
    • Opinions that are indicative of a larger pattern of questionable/problematic beliefs, specifically towards consent and pedophilia.
    • How common it is for men to lack emotional skills, and to prioritize "facts" and "logic" over them.
    • The tendency for privileged groups to ask questions or make points without considering whether the setting is appropriate, or the impact that speaking could have.
    • The tendency for privileged groups to feel the need to give opinions on subjects they have little-to-no lived experiences in. (i.e. Having the ego to feel that their opinions are always valuable, while not acknowledging potential gaps in their perspective.)
    • Giving people passes for problematic behavior on the basis of status or power. (i.e. Certain people are 'untouchable' and free to do as they please.)
    • Allowing dangerous individuals to rise to status or power in the first place, even when the harm they've caused is readily apparent. Sweeping that harm under the rug by focusing on their positive attributes or contributions.
    • The presence of systems which apply the above points inconsistently between groups of gender, race, sexuality, class, etc.
    • Generally, any actions which perpetuate structures that allow harassment, misogyny, and discrimination to thrive.

    This isn't just about RMS. This is common anywhere [white/straight/affluent/male] people make up the status quo or hold positions of power. This incident is representative of larger, ongoing issues. Combined, these points create a hostile and uncomfortable environment. They signal to marginalized groups: "Your concerns aren't as important as our concerns. Your safety isn't guaranteed. If something happens to you, you can't come to us for help. Your identity is lesser than ours. Your existence isn't welcome here. If you want to stay, you'll feel a constant obligation to fight, and to prove, and to defend your experiences and your perspective." In that sense, it's not a leap to go from what RMS wrote to 'women in STEM'.

    Inadvertently, you (and others in this thread, on lobste.rs, and on HN) are contributing to these systems as well by defending RMS in the way you have. I can bet you there are many folks lurking who see these things and nope right out of here. When the conversation is dominated like this, it contributes to Tildes itself being an unwelcoming place in much the same way as STEM as a field.

    15 votes
  17. Comment on Remove Richard Stallman in ~tech

    vivaria
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    I have a high tolerance for frustration when it is coming from a place of hurt. We live in systems that discourage speaking up about hurtful or discriminatory behavior, whether because of inaction...

    I have a high tolerance for frustration when it is coming from a place of hurt. We live in systems that discourage speaking up about hurtful or discriminatory behavior, whether because of inaction or outright retaliation. People learn to stay quiet unless they can guarantee their own safety. Outside of private and trusted circles, some of the only times we hear certain perspectives are when a person is pushed and prodded until they can no longer bottle their feelings. It gets messy, and that's okay given the circumstances. In those situations, it's better to listen than to critique tone and delivery.

    So, depending on the source of the anger, there are times when people are deserving of leeway, patience, understanding, and empathy even when their words are heated. I believe that this applies to both @hungariantoast and the author of the article.

    12 votes
  18. Comment on Tildylongstockings, what’s your morning routine? in ~talk

    vivaria
    Link
    I've struggled on and off with this problem, and I definitely agree with @aymm's suggestion of consistency. To add to that, an evening routine is just as important, and helps guarantee the morning...

    I've struggled on and off with this problem, and I definitely agree with @aymm's suggestion of consistency. To add to that, an evening routine is just as important, and helps guarantee the morning routine will go off without a hitch too.

    The hardest part for me is getting started and maintaining a routine to the point where my body/brain expects certain things to happen at certain times. That's really hard!

    What's helped in the past is having certain 'anchoring' activities that happen at a fixed time, that I enjoy/look forward to, and that help signal to my brain that I need to get into an "about to sleep" mode. If I can pull that off, then I'll go to bed at a consistent time. If I go to bed at a consistent time, I'm more likely to sleep soundly throughout the night. If I have a restful night, then I'll be less groggy when the alarm goes off. Anchoring activities help to get me out of bed, too.

    A past evening routine has been something like:

    • 7:30pm: 1 episode of QI or 2 episodes of an anime series
    • 8:30pm: Cup of tea, writing in journal
    • 9:00pm: Brush teeth, hop into bed with a book
    • 10:00pm-10:30pm: Fall asleep, depending on how tired I am/what's on my mind
    • 6:30am: Wake up, do morning routine.

    This has a built-in "devices off a few hours before bed" with it too, which is real helpful.

    5 votes
  19. Comment on Remove Richard Stallman in ~tech

    vivaria
    Link Parent
    Neutrality in tone shouldn't be the only indicator of how well a discussion is going. I think @hungariantoast's perspective is valuable and adds a dimension to the discussion that wasn't there...

    Neutrality in tone shouldn't be the only indicator of how well a discussion is going.

    I think @hungariantoast's perspective is valuable and adds a dimension to the discussion that wasn't there previously.

    26 votes