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    1. Democratic Debate #4 - October 15 2019

      This debate will start at 8pm EST. From CNN's website: It will air exclusively on CNN, CNN International and CNN en Español, and will stream on CNN.com's homepage and NYTimes.com's homepage. The...

      This debate will start at 8pm EST. From CNN's website:

      It will air exclusively on CNN, CNN International and CNN en Español, and will stream on CNN.com's homepage and NYTimes.com's homepage. The debate will also stream live on the following Facebook Pages: CNN, CNN International, CNN Politics, CNN Replay, AC360 and Erin Burnett OutFront.

      In addition, the debate will be available across mobile devices via CNN's and New York Times' apps for iOS and Android, via CNNgo apps for Apple TV, Roku, Amazon Fire, Chromecast and Android TV, SiriusXM Channels 116, 454 and 795, the Westwood One Radio Network and National Public Radio. You can also ask Amazon's Alexa to play the debate, and the voice-controlled assistant will play the audio of the debate.

      19 votes
    2. Democratic Debate #2 Thread (Night 2)

      welcome to debate #2, night 2. with night one out of the way, and the expectations set by our first night of candidates, we turn to a much more diverse, much more ideologically separated group of...

      welcome to debate #2, night 2. with night one out of the way, and the expectations set by our first night of candidates, we turn to a much more diverse, much more ideologically separated group of candidates ranging from asian-american technocrat andrew yang to moderate-progressives african-americans in booker and harris, and from berniecrat-type tulsi gabbard to solidly moderate joe biden. it seems likely that we'll see more fireworks today than we did last night, especially given CNN's adversarial lines of questioning in the first night. as always, here are all the details you'd ever need, and probably then some:

      i recommend you sort by newest first (or order posted) instead of the default since this thread will likely be semi-active and covering a live event.

      How to Watch:

      The debate each night will start at 8 p.m. ET and last two hours.
      TV broadcast: CNN
      Free online stream: CNN.com, CNN apps
      Additional coverage: CBS News, NBC News

      CNN's stream is here.

      The Candidates:

      The second Democratic presidential debate: July 30-31, 2019

      ~ Night 1 (Tuesday, July 30): Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg, former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke, Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, author Marianne Williamson, former Maryland Rep. John Delaney, former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan, and Montana Gov. Steve Bullock. ~
      Night 2 (Wednesday, July 31): Former Vice President Joe Biden, California Sen. Kamala Harris, New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker, former HUD Secretary Julián Castro, business leader Andrew Yang, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, and Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet.

      The Rules:

      A candidate "who consistently interrupts" on Tuesday and Wednesday nights will be penalized by having his or her time reduced.
      Campaign representatives have also been told there will be no "lightning round"-type questions requiring a show of hands or one word responses.
      The debate will be moderated by Dana Bash, Don Lemon and Jake Tapper. Each of the 10 candidates each night will be allowed to make brief opening and closing statements, the network said.

      The Analysis:

      NPR has 5 questions for this debate:

      1. Will there be any distinctions drawn between Sanders and Warren?
      2. Will some of the air be taken out of Sanders' sails because Biden isn't onstage?
      3. How is race raised?
      4. Who breaks out?
      5. Without hand-raising, will we get answers that are as clear?

      other pre-debate analysis pieces that may be pertinent to you:

      Aftermath of Night One:

      Expectations for Night Two:

      24 votes
    3. Democratic Debate #2 Thread (Night 1)

      welcome to debate #2, night 1. after a margin-moving first set of debates, the bar has been set for candidates. some candidates tonight are probably in a fight for their campaign hopes, while...

      welcome to debate #2, night 1. after a margin-moving first set of debates, the bar has been set for candidates. some candidates tonight are probably in a fight for their campaign hopes, while others are mostly looking to not get obliterated and stay the course. here are all the details you'd ever need, and probably then some:

      i recommend you sort by newest first (or order posted) instead of the default since this thread will likely be semi-active and covering a live event.

      How to Watch:

      The debate each night will start at 8 p.m. ET and last two hours.
      TV broadcast: CNN
      Free online stream: CNN.com, CNN apps
      Additional coverage: CBS News, NBC News

      CNN's stream is here, ABC stream which may or may not be meta commentary

      The Candidates:

      The second Democratic presidential debate: July 30-31, 2019

      Night 1 (Tuesday, July 30): Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg, former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke, Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, author Marianne Williamson, former Maryland Rep. John Delaney, former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan, and Montana Gov. Steve Bullock.
      Night 2 (Wednesday, July 31): Former Vice President Joe Biden, California Sen. Kamala Harris, New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker, former HUD Secretary Julián Castro, business leader Andrew Yang, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, and Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet.

      The Rules:

      A candidate "who consistently interrupts" on Tuesday and Wednesday nights will be penalized by having his or her time reduced.
      Campaign representatives have also been told there will be no "lightning round"-type questions requiring a show of hands or one word responses.
      The debate will be moderated by Dana Bash, Don Lemon and Jake Tapper. Each of the 10 candidates each night will be allowed to make brief opening and closing statements, the network said.

      The Analysis:

      NPR has 5 questions for this debate:

      1. Will there be any distinctions drawn between Sanders and Warren?
      2. Will some of the air be taken out of Sanders' sails because Biden isn't onstage?
      3. How is race raised?
      4. Who breaks out?
      5. Without hand-raising, will we get answers that are as clear?

      other pre-debate analysis pieces that may be pertinent to you:

      31 votes
    4. Democratic Debate #1 Thread (Night 2)

      welcome to debate #1, night 2. the first thread on this turned out to be about twice as active as i was expecting (i estimated at most 50 or so replies), and that was for the "undercard" so unless...

      welcome to debate #1, night 2. the first thread on this turned out to be about twice as active as i was expecting (i estimated at most 50 or so replies), and that was for the "undercard" so unless something changes with this night, i think we'll be doing these in pairs from here on out--at least until either the DNC pushes out enough candidates for one debate, or activity drops significantly in these threads. previous night's thread can be found here if you'd like to continue the discussions of last night's candidates. anyways here are all the details you'd ever need, and probably then some:

      first off, i recommend you sort by newest first instead of the default since this thread will likely be semi-active and covering a live event.

      How to Watch:

      The debate is being broadcast by NBC News, MSNBC and Telemundo, and will air live across all three networks starting at 9 p.m. ET.
      Telemundo will broadcast the debate in Spanish.
      The debate will stream online free on NBC News' digital platforms, including NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, the NBC News Mobile App and OTT apps on Roku, Apple TV and Amazon Fire TV, in addition to Telemundo's digital platforms.

      livestreams will also be available on Twitter, Facebook, and Youtube because the DNC mandated that of its partners for the debates.

      The Candidates:

      Democratic Presidential Debate: See The 20 Candidates Who Will Be Onstage

      • Michael Bennet (Senator from Colorado)

      Bennet is running on fixing a broken political system, the blame for which he puts at the feet of Republican Senate leader Mitch McConnell. Bennet says spending from wars and tax cuts was essentially the U.S. lighting “money on fire.”

      • Joe Biden (Former vice president)

      Biden’s top concern is less about reshaping America and more about returning America to “normalcy.” He argues that if President Trump gets another four years, the DNA of the country will be fundamentally altered.

      • Pete Buttigieg (Mayor of South Bend, Ind.)

      The 37-year-old is making a generational-change argument. He argues for progressive processes — like fixing redistricting and voting rights — in addition to policies — like being more cautious on war and more progressive on climate change and health care.

      • Kirsten Gillibrand (Senator from New York)

      She’s focused on women’s rights, especially when it comes to health care. She boasts that a Fox host called her “not very polite” for speaking out about the “nationwide assault on women’s reproductive freedoms” and “fundamental human rights for women.”

      • Kamala Harris (Senator from California)

      Harris’ slogan is “for the people,” and she’s making the case that President Trump is a “fraud.” The former prosecutor says Trump is fighting for the wrong people — the powerful and wealthy — while she wants to “advocate for the voiceless and vulnerable.”

      • John Hickenlooper (Former governor of Colorado)

      The centrist has a pragmatic message. He says pragmatists aren’t against big things; they know how to get them done. He has also spoken out against Democrats’ lurch toward socialism, warning that moving in that direction would reelect President Trump.

      • Bernie Sanders (Senator from Vermont)

      Sanders wants to beat President Trump, but he believes the way to do it is not with “middle-ground” approaches, but with promising wholesale progressive change. He’s the only candidate willing to wear the (democratic) socialist label.

      • Eric Swalwell (Representative from California’s 15th District)

      He has focused his campaign on ending gun violence in the country, targeting semiautomatic assault weapons in particular by calling for a mandatory national ban and buyback.

      • Marianne Williamson (Spiritual guru, entrepreneur)

      The New Age author is campaigning with a philosophy of “Think. Love. Participate.” As an outsider to politics, she believes change needs to come from the outside and that “half-truth tellers” can’t beat President Trump.

      • Andrew Yang (Founder of Venture for America)

      The startup investor is running on a data-first approach to the presidency. His big idea is to address the threat of automation with a Universal Basic Income, in which every adult would get $1,000 a month.

      The Rules:

      Candidates will have 60 seconds to answer questions and 30 seconds to respond to follow-ups. No opening statements, though candidates will have a chance to deliver closing remarks.
      Five segments each night separated by four commercial breaks.

      The Analysis:

      NPR has 7 questions of their 8 for the debates which apply to today's debate:

      Will Biden stand up to the scrutiny?
      Is the debate an opportunity or danger zone for Bernie Sanders?
      Can Harris and Buttigieg stand out?
      Do the pragmatists or progressives win out?
      How much of a focus is Trump?
      How will foreign policy factor in?
      Who will stick in voters' minds?

      other pre-debate analysis pieces that may be pertinent to you:

      34 votes
    5. Democratic Debate #1 Thread

      welcome to debate #1, night 1. given tildes's small size, i'm not really sure how this will go, so my plan here on paper is to do two threads (one today, one tomorrow) for this set of debates, and...

      welcome to debate #1, night 1. given tildes's small size, i'm not really sure how this will go, so my plan here on paper is to do two threads (one today, one tomorrow) for this set of debates, and then based on how active this set is make a decision on whether or not to consolidate them for the many future debates that will happen. if things go particularly well or poorly tonight though, i might expedite that decision (hence the un-specific title), but we'll see. anyways, here are all the details you'd ever need, and probably then some:

      How to Watch:

      The debate is being broadcast by NBC News, MSNBC and Telemundo, and will air live across all three networks starting at 9 p.m. ET.
      Telemundo will broadcast the debate in Spanish.
      The debate will stream online free on NBC News' digital platforms, including NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, the NBC News Mobile App and OTT apps on Roku, Apple TV and Amazon Fire TV, in addition to Telemundo's digital platforms.

      livestreams will also be available on Twitter, Facebook, and Youtube because the DNC mandated that of its partners for the debates.

      here is the youtube link.

      The Candidates

      Democratic Presidential Debate: See The 20 Candidates Who Will Be Onstage

      • Cory Booker (Senator from New Jersey):

      Booker is running on an aggressive optimism, promising to bring people together and fight for things like criminal justice overhaul, improved economic opportunity and LGBTQ rights.

      • Julián Castro (Former secretary of housing and urban development):

      The former Obama administration housing chief is running on hopeful notes. He promises students being saddled with less debt, veterans being respected, people of color being safe and immigrants being welcome.

      • Bill de Blasio (Mayor of New York City):

      Leading the country’s most populous city, de Blasio is running on putting working people first and is touting his record on minimum wage, sick leave, health care and universal pre-K. And he’s running against President Trump’s immigration and climate policies.

      • John Delaney (Former representative from Maryland’s 6th District):

      Delaney has campaigned in early states for nearly two years. He takes a pragmatic approach, especially on health care. He has spoken out against “Medicare for All,” a stance that hasn’t sat well with liberal activists.

      • Tulsi Gabbard (Representative from Hawaii’s 2nd District):

      The military veteran is running on a platform of “peace,” to end foreign wars and use the money to spend in America.

      • Jay Inslee (Governor of Washington):

      His campaign begins and ends with the threat posed by climate change. He argues that the economy and fighting climate change are not incompatible and that a green economy creates jobs.

      • Amy Klobuchar (Senator from Minnesota):

      Klobuchar believes in a pragmatism that’s rooted in her senatorial experience and a Midwestern optimism. She believes it’s necessary to reach out to solve problems and bridge divides between rural and urban communities.

      • Beto O’Rourke (Former representative from Texas’ 16th District):

      Best known for almost beating Ted Cruz, O’Rourke has a “positive, unifying vision.” He wants to fix American democracy with changes to campaign finance and voting, and to end wars, reduce gun violence, address climate change and guarantee women’s health care.

      • Tim Ryan (Representative from Ohio’s 13th District):

      He’s running on “rebuilding the American Dream,” and that means, in his view, blue-collar jobs, public education and health care.

      • Elizabeth Warren (Senator from Massachusetts):

      You name it, Warren has a plan for it. She’s not running to create a new system, but she is running on big, structural change, including increased regulation and scrutiny of Wall Street and banking.

      The Rules:

      Candidates will have 60 seconds to answer questions and 30 seconds to respond to follow-ups. No opening statements, though candidates will have a chance to deliver closing remarks.
      Five segments each night separated by four commercial breaks.

      The Analysis:

      NPR has 5 questions of their 8 for the debates which apply to today's debate:

      Does Warren make the most of commanding the stage?
      Do the pragmatists or progressives win out?
      How much of a focus is Trump?
      How will foreign policy factor in?
      Who will stick in voters' minds?

      other pre-debate analysis pieces that may be pertinent to you:

      34 votes