6 votes

Grover - A State-of-the-Art Defense against Neural Fake News

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  1. ascii
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    I had no idea that ML-generated news was so difficult to detect. I plugged in the following seeds: The resulting system-generated article is quite readable, and it's not immediately obvious that...

    I had no idea that ML-generated news was so difficult to detect.

    I plugged in the following seeds:

    Domain: nytimes.com

    Author: Thomas L. Friedman

    Title: Brexit and Scottish Independence

    The resulting system-generated article is quite readable, and it's not immediately obvious that no human wrote it.

    But we are not necessarily doomed to drown in an ocean of pseudo-information where we cannot distinguish the real from the Matrix. The language model that created the bogus article is equally adept at detecting bogus articles.


    beginning of system-generated text

    Of the series of disputes that the United Kingdom has been having, one — Brexit — feels most intractable: Can Britain still be a free-market, competitive global player, or does it need to go on the subsidy-and-protectionist diet of the European Union?

    This month in a speech in Florence, Theresa May, as always unelected Prime Minister, seemed to have gotten the message. She committed to “building a new and fair settlement.”

    She also vowed to make sure that “people in all regions of the United Kingdom are given more opportunities to develop their own economies and compete on the global stage.”

    May insisted that “frictionless trade is good for Britain … for the region and for Europe.” But she also acknowledged that “what works in the City of London does not necessarily work in Scotland.”

    This commitment has two critical implications for the Scottish independence referendum which, if taken, could alter the political balance of the UK. First, it should strengthen May’s case to Britain that she is the prime minister best qualified to lead an “enterprise partnership.”

    There’s a case to be made that May, whose zest for lifting her game in international negotiations and who came from a global leadership family (her father was former prime minister Edward Heath, her mother was former British foreign secretary and ambassador to the U.S., and her brother is the former British chancellor of the exchequer), is more in tune with the sentiments of Scotland than her predecessor, David Cameron.

    Second, this means that if Scotland exits the UK, then it should probably proceed to join the European Union, and if it stays, it should probably seek to rejoin. Given that Scottish voters overwhelmingly rejected independence by a 59 to 40 margin, even more people (who never want to leave Scotland, no matter how they feel about the rest of the UK) would like to see Scottish self-rule.

    end of system-generated text

    3 votes