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    1. Traditionally I've used dark themes for everything I could on all of my devices, as I found it easier on the eyes when I'd usually use my computer (evening - night). Recently, I made the switch...

      Traditionally I've used dark themes for everything I could on all of my devices, as I found it easier on the eyes when I'd usually use my computer (evening - night). Recently, I made the switch back to light stuff as I've been using my computer more for notes and assignments I'd normally hand-write, and I find I get drowsy less and have an easier time using the computer in a bright room than before - I just switched my theme on a whim one morning, so I wasn't expecting that at all!

      So now I'm rethinking all my previous bias about dark themes being 'better' regardless of the situation, and I'm curious if anyone here had any thoughts and/or could point me to some reading on the subject (the subject being the effects of light/dark colours in work or concentration). It's something I realize now might be fairly important, as I'm looking at my screen for most of the day, but never really gave much thought before outside of tracking down the 'Dark' theme switch.

      30 votes
    2. I can't shake the dejavu feeling I'm getting using any kind of messaging these days. Today we have an awful lot of messaging apps, that are all roughly the same, with similar features - Signal,...

      I can't shake the dejavu feeling I'm getting using any kind of messaging these days. Today we have an awful lot of messaging apps, that are all roughly the same, with similar features - Signal, Telegram, WhatsApp, Riot, etc. This happened once already, at the dawn of 200X IM revolution that deprecated SMS for good we also had MSN, ICQ, GTalk, Jabber, etc. This also was a set of very similar personal messaging clients and protocols, similar in any way to each other. It all changed when the multi-protocol messaging apps came out - Pidgin, QiP, Miranda and others made it easy to gather all your contacts from various protocols in one place and to keep in touch with everyone. Shortly after Jabber transports were made so you could congregate all other accounts into one single XMPP account. Even N900 that came out in 2009 had the ability to gather various accounts into one single contact list.
      I feel like right now with all the segmented IM apps it's a good time for something like this to happen again, and Telegram already has wat-bridge.
      What are your thoughts on that topic? Do you think the history will repeat itself? Would a new federated formate like XMPP rise up?

      24 votes
    3. It's obviously bad when "real" data like full names and credit card info leaks, but most data companies collect is probably email address and some anonymous things like which buttons and when the...

      It's obviously bad when "real" data like full names and credit card info leaks, but most data companies collect is probably email address and some anonymous things like which buttons and when the user clicked.

      Nevertheless, such data collection, tracking and telemetry is considered quite bad among power users. I don't support those practices either. But I'm struggling to consolidate my arguments agaist data collection. The one I'm confident about is effects on performance and battery life on mobile devices, but why else it's bad I'm not sure.

      What are your arguments? Why is it bad when a company X knows what anonymous user Y did and made money on that info? What's the good response to anyone who asks why I'm doing the "privacy things"?

      21 votes
    4. I received this email yesterday but haven't seen any blog posts or press releases about it yet: Hello Administrator, Since our Beta Program announcement last year, we’ve been testing an...

      I received this email yesterday but haven't seen any blog posts or press releases about it yet:

      Hello Administrator,

      Since our Beta Program announcement last year, we’ve been testing an enterprise-ready version of Google Voice. Over the next seven days, Google Voice will become available as a core G Suite service for all eligible* G Suite customers (additional fees apply to this new, managed version of Google Voice). This email will help you understand the transition details but you can also refer to the Voice webpage for more information.

      What's changing:

      • Managed Google Voice is available in 3 tiers and will become a core G Suite service for your domain after subscribing to a service tier.
      • Managed Voice accounts will be covered under your existing G Suite agreement and additional Google Voice service specific terms.
      • Support for managed Voice accounts will be the same as other G Suite core services.

      What's not changing:

      • The Google Voice service will remain “on” by default.
      • If users in your domain signed up for Voice prior to this launch, they will be able to maintain their legacy unmanaged Voice subscriptions without additional cost, and will remain subject to the Google Voice consumer terms of service. You can add a Voice subscription and upgrade these users to managed Voice users in your Admin console.
      • Hangouts Meet (also a core G Suite service) is integrated with Google Voice, allowing meeting participants to dial in or be added by phone.

      What do I need to do?

      • If you did not participate in the Google Voice Beta Program and would like to use Google Voice for your organization, follow these steps to add a Voice subscription.

      We're here to help

      If you have additional questions or need technical assistance, please contact Google support. When you call or submit your support case, reference issue number ----------.

      Sincerely,

      The G Suite Team

      * Google Voice is not yet available for G Suite for Government customers. Google Voice is available for purchase in select countries.

      It looks like Google Voice is going to be sticking around for awhile. You can even use Polycom desk phones with it if you get the $20 tier.

      9 votes
    5. After all this time watching cryptocurrency from a distance, I have finally seen a real world use case. Marijuana is legal in this US state, however national banks are not allowed to service the...

      After all this time watching cryptocurrency from a distance, I have finally seen a real world use case.

      Marijuana is legal in this US state, however national banks are not allowed to service the marijuana industry due to federal law. Therefore all card processing is not available to the retail outlets. It’s only cash transactions at the retail level.

      Until today. Today I was asked if I wanted to pay with a debit card. When I asked how, he said they used litecoin. So I imagine that the card is being run by a company which then converts it to litecoin to pay the merchant. Anyone have any clue on what that might cost the merchant as far as percentage?

      I thought I would share this because after hearing all hype rollercoaster regarding cryptocurrency, I have finally seen a somewhat legitimate use of it in the real world.

      Do you see any other use cases of crypto out in the wild these days?

      13 votes
    6. I've used the LastPass authenticator for a while (since I also used the LastPass password manager and it integrated nicely) but I recently switched to Bitwarden as I'm looking to get away from...

      I've used the LastPass authenticator for a while (since I also used the LastPass password manager and it integrated nicely) but I recently switched to Bitwarden as I'm looking to get away from LastPass. I've been putting off moving to a different authenticator for a while and now that I'm wanting to switch I'm not really sure to which one.

      My only requirement is that it needs to be available on iOS. So what do you recommend?

      14 votes