kfwyre's recent activity

  1. Comment on Shingai - Echoes of You (2020) in ~music

    kfwyre
    Link Parent
    Glad to know I'm not alone! I loved the Noisettes (especially their second album Wild Young Hearts), but I feel like they were completely and undeservedly overlooked. Her voice and her vocal...

    Glad to know I'm not alone! I loved the Noisettes (especially their second album Wild Young Hearts), but I feel like they were completely and undeservedly overlooked. Her voice and her vocal delivery are absolutely incredible. Case in point: my favorite from them is Shingai's genuinely nervewracking live performance of "Atticus".

    Also that album link is missing Bandcamp!

    1 vote
  2. Comment on Shingai - Echoes of You (2020) in ~music

    kfwyre
    Link
    Shingai was the lead singer of the Noisettes, if anyone here was into them. I just found out she put out a solo album last year, and it's splendid. I genuinely wasn't sure which track I should...

    Shingai was the lead singer of the Noisettes, if anyone here was into them. I just found out she put out a solo album last year, and it's splendid. I genuinely wasn't sure which track I should link, as they're all so good in different ways.

    1 vote
  3. Comment on Tildes Screenless Day Discussion Thread - May 2021 in ~life

    kfwyre
    (edited )
    Link
    kfwyre's Screenless Day Plan Tomorrow is Mother's Day, and my husband and I are, for the first time in over a year, hosting people in our home. It's just a small gathering -- six people total, all...

    kfwyre's Screenless Day Plan

    Tomorrow is Mother's Day, and my husband and I are, for the first time in over a year, hosting people in our home. It's just a small gathering -- six people total, all fully vaccinated.

    I have tears in my eyes typing that though. It feels so, so good to be able to get together again without fear.

    I'm taking my screenless day tomorrow. I want to be fully present with them in person. That's the whole plan.

    4 votes
  4. Comment on California will discourage students who are gifted at math in ~humanities

    kfwyre
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    This isn't true in my experience. Nearly every math teacher I know and have ever worked with genuinely loves math. Teacher burnout is a very real thing, and advanced courses like the ones you...

    It’s rare that someone who has fallen in love with math themselves ends up teaching it.

    This isn't true in my experience. Nearly every math teacher I know and have ever worked with genuinely loves math.

    In my experience the teachers that loved math the most are the ones teaching the advanced stuff. My AP statistics and AP calculus teachers both got visibly excited about the topics they taught, sometimes nearly jumping up and down when coming to a conclusion.

    Teacher burnout is a very real thing, and advanced courses like the ones you identified are the most sought-after classes among teachers because they're the most enjoyable ones to teach. Classes with high skill-gates screen out problems: students who are unmotivated, have behavioral issues, have lagging skills, etc. Furthermore, they fundamentally select for people who are interested in the topic. For example, not everyone who takes AP Calculus necessarily loves math (some are taking it for the GPA, or to get ahead on college credits), but the class will attract those that do love math -- far more than a standard math class.

    These classes are as close to an ideal educational environment as you can get, and it is much easier to bring to joy on a subject to a willing and able audience rather than an apathetic or ill-prepared one. It very well could be that teachers who spend their days teaching primarily classes like that have an energy and enthusiasm to bring to the subject because they teach classes like that. The phenomenon that you identified might have been an effect rather than a cause.

    10 votes
  5. Comment on California will discourage students who are gifted at math in ~humanities

    kfwyre
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    Thanks for the ping, vektor. As identified by @skybrian, this article is pretty useless. It's basically just fearmongering on the term "equity" and a whole lot of hypothetical outrage posturing. I...
    • Exemplary

    Thanks for the ping, vektor.

    As identified by @skybrian, this article is pretty useless. It's basically just fearmongering on the term "equity" and a whole lot of hypothetical outrage posturing. I wasn't familiar with Reason, but this article pinged enough negative talking points on education that it made me suspicious. I checked the front page, and, sure enough, school hating is exactly what we're dealing with here.

    I don't think this particular article is especially valuable to respond to, but I do think some of the bigger ideas it brings up are valuable to consider. I also think the comments it has generated here are very valuable, as many people have identified some significant, big picture tensions that exist within education. I wish I had time to do justice to all of them, but I could honestly write tens of thousands of words on each and probably still not get to what I want to say. We are in territory where there are NO simple answers.

    Unfortunately I'm only in a place right now where I can provide simple answers, which is actually incredibly difficult for me. Here's a quick rundown:

    On gifted students:

    They deserve better. We don't do enough to meet their needs. I think this oversight isn't out of malice but because there are so many other students who have significantly higher needs that aren't being met that gifted students aren't a priority. By the metrics of education they tend to be a success (i.e. they test well). We don't tend to consider metrics that involve fulfilling potential or personal satisfaction, however, which would help identify students who meet minimums but have unfulfilled maximums.

    On equity:

    If you are angry about gifted students not having their needs met, I encourage you to get really angry on behalf of gifted students in poverty not having their needs met. Gifted students in underfunded schools experience what others have complained about in this thread ten times over.

    On math instruction:

    Math standards at present go too fast and do not allow most students to work to mastery. California's own standardized testing data shows that by 3rd grade (the first year of testing), 50% of students are not meeting proficiency. Acknowledging that half of all nine-year-olds in the state are behind is either a indictment of our education system or an indicator that the expectations put on those children are not appropriate for their development.

    On standardized test scores:

    Standardized testing exists to be an indictment of education. That is its purpose. The inappropriate expectations put on students are by design, so that we can cast the institution as failing and justify the need for further testing and interventions. Everyone thinks I sound like a conspiracy theorist when I say this. I've stopped caring about that. Instead of going on at length to try to convince people I'm not talking out of my ass, I've identified what I consider the most trenchant illustration of the transparent bullshit of testing in the US. The testing industry is machine-grading students' essays in 21 different states, meaning that the scores that assess students' proficiencies in writing in nearly half the states in the country are assigned by algorithm. If that doesn't point to the idea that this data lacks even the pretense of fidelity then I don't know what will.

    On standards:

    As I was saying earlier: too much, too fast, too railroaded. Students do not get to develop math skills to mastery. Thus they have shaky foundational skills that cannot be adequately built upon. If we do accept the standardized test scores at face value we can see that, according to that data, half of students halfway through elementary school are already ill-equipped to move on to the next grade. This snowballs as they continue on. Students are also all funneled towards higher-level abstract mathematics as a minimum standard rather than one potential pathway. I do not believe that Algebra II needs to be universally taken.

    On math teacher quality:

    Tildes has a lot of people who are undoubtedly very good at math, and I imagine many people here likely imagine some hypothetical world in which they, themselves, are math teachers. Sometimes this fantasy might even come with a bit of an edge to it, where you imagine yourself as a "good" teacher -- better than those shitty ones you might have had or that you've heard about.

    I don't want to take that fantasy away from anyone, but I do want to add a bit to it. Let's say for the sake of the assignment that you envision yourself as a high school teacher. I want you to include the following data point in your fantasy: over half of your students have been behind grade-level in your subject for at least the past five years. Do you teach to your grade-level standards for the portion of the class that is ready and champing at the bit for higher-level material, or do you make your lessons accessible to the students who are several full grade levels behind at this point?

    Furthermore, when, after your first month, you walk into a data meeting where your administrators point out that 70% of your students are not meeting your grade-level standards and put this squarely on your shoulders, should you consider yourself a failure?

    Stand and Deliver still has people believing that charisma, persistence, and a love of the subject are enough for students, but the real Jaime Escalante shows us that framework is nothing but a fiction:

    Still, it took Escalante eight years to build the math program that achieved what “Stand and Deliver” shows: a class of 18 who pass with flying colors. During this time, he convinced the principal, Henry Gradillas, to raise the school’s math requirements; he designed a pipeline of courses to prepare Garfield’s students for AP calculus; he became department head and hand-selected top teachers for his feeder courses; he and Gradillas even influenced the area junior high schools to offer algebra. In other words, to achieve his AP students’ success, he transformed the school’s math department. Escalante himself emphasized in interviews that no student went the way of the film’s Angel: from basic math in one year to AP calculus in the next.

    On teacher quality again:

    Escalante provided institutional solutions, not individual ones, and if there's one thing that I want people to genuinely and truly understand about education, it's that teachers do not exist in isolation.

    The good teachers you had were good not just because of their skillset, content knowledge, or temperament -- they were also good because of other factors that benefitted them, like the composition of their classes, their workload, and their administrators. Correspondingly, many of the shitty teachers out there aren't necessarily shitty because of who they are individually (though that's definitely true of some) but because of factors beyond themselves.

    You might be amazing at math, be able to connect with students, be able to explain concepts really well, and be incredibly dedicated, and you might still be a shitty teacher because of factors outside of your control. What happens when you take a position where assignments and pacing are predetermined and you have to teach the same thing, in the same way, at the same time as the other teachers of your subject in your building? What happens when your students lack prerequisite skills for your class? What happens when you're told to teach four different subjects and you only have 45 minutes to prepare for all of them in a given day? What happens when your administrators don't handle behavioral or discipline issues, leaving misbehaving students to continually disrupt your class? What happens when your school doesn't even have copier paper for you to print stuff on?

    18 votes
  6. Comment on What have you been listening to this week? in ~music

    kfwyre
    Link
    Manchester Orchestra’s The Million Masks of God came out last Friday and I’ve been listening to it since. It flows very nicely. I don’t really know individual songs off of it so much as I know it...

    Manchester Orchestra’s The Million Masks of God came out last Friday and I’ve been listening to it since. It flows very nicely. I don’t really know individual songs off of it so much as I know it as one big piece of music.

    Dagny’s Strangers/Lovers is simple, catchy, satisfying pop.

    2 votes
  7. Tildes Screenless Day Discussion Thread - May 2021

    What is a "Screenless Day"? Tildes "Screenless Day" is a simple event aimed at encouraging people to take a temporary step away from toxic or consuming aspects of technology and spend their time...

    What is a "Screenless Day"?

    Tildes "Screenless Day" is a simple event aimed at encouraging people to take a temporary step away from toxic or consuming aspects of technology and spend their time and energies elsewhere.


    When is it?

    It takes place over the weekend starting on the first Friday of each month. Participants will choose that Friday, Saturday, or Sunday to take as their screenless day -- whichever works best for their schedule.

    Some people might not be able to participate in that window, and that's fine too. They can choose to shift their day earlier or later as needed. It is also completely fine (and encouraged!) to take personal screenless days separate from the event if you like. This thread will be posted the first weekend of each month, but it is open for comments the entire month.


    Does it have to be truly "screenless"?

    "Screenless" is an ideal, not a mandate. The spirit of the day is to deliberately step away from toxic or consuming aspects of technology, and what that means is different for each person. Thus, it is up to each participant to determine what "screenless" means to them. Some might only choose to not use social media for a day; some might choose to eliminate all "screens" but still use their ereader; some may maintain some screen use but only for necessity (e.g. work; classes; GPS; etc.). Some might get rid of screens entirely, or go fully "unplugged" for the day.


    How do I participate?

    You do not have to do anything formal at all to participate -- simply take your screenless day in whatever way is best for you! That said, I think it's more enjoyable and valuable to make this a shared experience, so the structured way to participate, for anyone interested, is as follows:

    STEP ONE: Before you take your day, post a top-level comment in this thread detailing your plan for your screenless day.

    Consider the following questions:

    • Why do you want to take a screenless day?
    • How are you personally defining "screenless"?
    • What do you plan to do with your time?
    • What do you hope to get out of it?

    To have your plan stand out from normal conversation, please use the # markdown to title your post "[yourusername's] Screenless Day Plan"

    STEP TWO: Take your screenless day.

    • In the spirit of the event, you should probably not be reading or posting to this topic at all that day. To each their own, however. :)

    STEP THREE: After it is over, return to the thread to reflect on your screenless day.

    Post a response to your original comment in which you tell us all about your day.

    • What did you do?
    • How did it feel?
    • Was it difficult? Easy?
    • Did anything surprise you?
    • Were there any unexpected challenges/breakthroughs?
    • If you plan to do it again, what would you change? What would you keep the same?

    To have your follow-up stand out from normal conversation, please use the # markdown to title your post "[yourusername's] Screenless Day Reflection"


    Can I chat in this thread if I'm not participating?

    Yes! The more, the merrier! Discussion from anyone, participant or non-participant alike, is welcome. Though, do understand that it might take a bit longer than normal for some people to respond. :)

    12 votes
  8. What are your feelings towards achievements?

    Do you like them? Hate them? Don’t care about them? Take pride in them? What do you consider good/bad achievements? Do they affect how you play games? Do you feel you have to get most/all of them?...

    Do you like them? Hate them? Don’t care about them? Take pride in them?

    What do you consider good/bad achievements?

    Do they affect how you play games?

    Do you feel you have to get most/all of them?

    What games have used them to novel effect?

    Anything else you want to say about the topic is fair game as well. This is an open door for any discussion related to achievements.

    14 votes
  9. Comment on TV Tuesdays Free Talk in ~tv

    kfwyre
    Link Parent
    Whooooops! I was genuinely trying to just make a cute reference to the show (I did the hands!) but, much like Poppy and her broadcast, did NOT adequately think through the implications of that!

    Whooooops! I was genuinely trying to just make a cute reference to the show (I did the hands!) but, much like Poppy and her broadcast, did NOT adequately think through the implications of that!

    1 vote
  10. Comment on TV Tuesdays Free Talk in ~tv

    kfwyre
    Link
    Pinging @joplin and @Omnicrola as a thank you for recommending Mythic Quest. I appreciate the two of you inviting me to be part of your... DINNER PARTY. 🤗 I absolutely loved the series. It started...

    Pinging @joplin and @Omnicrola as a thank you for recommending Mythic Quest. I appreciate the two of you inviting me to be part of your... DINNER PARTY. 🤗

    I absolutely loved the series. It started out as a standard workplace comedy with a nerdy bent but ended up hitting some genuinely unexpected high notes. E05, "A Dark Quiet Death", was an incredible special episode (that was completely out of left field given the tone and format of the rest of the season), while E10 "Quarantine" was a COVID episode executed absolutely perfectly. The E11 "Everlight" special even got me legitimately choked up.

    I love the ground that the series covered (women in gaming, Nazis in gaming, unionization, crunch, monetization, etc.) and I'm very excited to start season 2 in two days.

    5 votes
  11. Comment on Reddit AMA: Jason Schreier, gaming journalist and author of the books Blood, Sweat, and Pixels and the upcoming Press Reset: Ruin and Recovery in the Video Game Industry in ~games

    kfwyre
    Link
    I had no idea he had a new book coming out, and now I'm excited to read it. The AMA advertising worked! I liked Blood, Sweat, and Pixels, though I felt he was a little too soft on some of the...

    I had no idea he had a new book coming out, and now I'm excited to read it. The AMA advertising worked!

    I liked Blood, Sweat, and Pixels, though I felt he was a little too soft on some of the industry issues (like crunch). It's been a while since I read it so my memory might be off, but I seem to remember that his main thesis was something along the lines of "yeah some of this is bad, but that's just the price we pay for games we love!" I remember getting the feeling that it glossed over some genuine problems a bit too much for my liking.

    I'll be interested to see if this one has a bit more bite to it, especially given the changes in Schreier's position and the industry itself since his last book.

    3 votes
  12. Comment on The Instagram ads Facebook won't show you in ~tech

    kfwyre
    Link
    Very clever, and I say that both for the ads themselves and also because I think they expected this outcome. Facebook shutting them down gives them a good story they can use as an ad itself, as...

    Very clever, and I say that both for the ads themselves and also because I think they expected this outcome. Facebook shutting them down gives them a good story they can use as an ad itself, as they've done here.

    7 votes
  13. Comment on Let's talk about attention in ~talk

    kfwyre
    Link Parent
    You've said so much here that is directly resonant with my own experiences. Thank you for putting it into words. You are not alone! I literally wake up with a snippet of a song in my head almost...

    You've said so much here that is directly resonant with my own experiences. Thank you for putting it into words.

    The other is that I get audio snippets stuck in my head incredibly easily and once something is in my head it can stay there, repeating the same 10–15 seconds of song or conversation or whatever it happens to be for hours or until something else gets stuck in its place.

    You are not alone! I literally wake up with a snippet of a song in my head almost every single day of my life. If it's not a song, it's a quotable quote or something that has a sort of definable rhythm or melody to it. And the snippet sticks around for hours.

    It's not always just in my head either. When I first started dating my now-husband, I learned just how often I would sing/hum whatever was stuck on repeat for me without even realizing I was doing it.

    I used to be able to at least focus on things I really enjoyed—get sucked into a good book and that sort of thing—but now I can't even sit down and do something fun for more than a few minutes at a time.

    Reading was part of what inspired me to make this thread. Years ago I used to spend entire Saturdays on the couch, chain reading books literally all day. I remember finishing the entirety of Gone Girl in effectively one sitting, getting up only for very brief bathroom and food breaks. It was magnetic. Glued to my hands. I literally couldn't put it down until I had seen it through to the end. I remember another Saturday where I woke up, went to a bookstore, came home with three random choices, and then read all of them that same day.

    Now, I'm finding that I can't get into a book. Not just that I can't sit down and read it, but that I simply... don't. It's not so much attention as intention? But the lack of intention feels like it's a product of attention? I haven't figured it out all yet, I just know that I feel like I'm in a weird space where it feels like I'm not spending time right now but time is spending me, and even though I'm aware of it I also don't do anything to counteract it?

    2 votes
  14. Comment on Let's talk about attention in ~talk

    kfwyre
    Link Parent
    To add to this, I had some difficulty when crafting the topic because I didn’t want to appear judgmental to people who struggle with focus nor uphold sustained focus as a unilateral good. I...

    To add to this, I had some difficulty when crafting the topic because I didn’t want to appear judgmental to people who struggle with focus nor uphold sustained focus as a unilateral good. I thought a lot about how to make the questions aim at personal experience rather than any sort of valuation regarding attention/focus in general, because I wanted it to be open and inviting to everyone.

    I think if we only hear from one type of perspective then we don’t get as broad a summary on the topic, so I do think it is valuable to hear from neurotypical people, as well as those who have positive relationships with their attention. Rather than having answers of those types be off-putting, I think it's actually a good thing for some of us to know that there are people out there for whom that's a reality. Commiserating on difficulties is valuable, but if it's not counterbalanced it can feel kind of hopeless, you know?

    2 votes
  15. Comment on Trixie Mattel (feat. Orville Peck) - Jackson (2021) in ~music

    kfwyre
    Link Parent
    FINE. Now just where did I put my rhinestoned white flag again? In all seriousness, Peck has been on my to-listen list for months now (I think as a result of one of your comments, actually), and...

    Surrender yourself to the gay future of country.

    FINE. Now just where did I put my rhinestoned white flag again?

    In all seriousness, Peck has been on my to-listen list for months now (I think as a result of one of your comments, actually), and this finally spurred me to give his album a listen. What a voice!

    2 votes
  16. Comment on Inside the all-hands meeting that led to a third of Basecamp employees quitting in ~tech

    kfwyre
    (edited )
    Link
    The first school I taught in was in a city with a prominent black population. During that time (and especially in the years since) when I brought up that I taught there, I would often get asked...
    • Exemplary

    The first school I taught in was in a city with a prominent black population.

    During that time (and especially in the years since) when I brought up that I taught there, I would often get asked about the “weird names” of any students I had. This was often the product of curiosity or just idle smalltalk, and, more often than not, once that topic was introduced, the conversation took a specific and surprisingly common turn.

    The person I was talking with would begin to tell me about La-a.

    La-a was always the “real” name of a “real” student, but it was always from some distant second- or third-hand source: a friend of a friend, or cousin who “knew someone” who was a teacher.

    People would bring up the story because La-a is meant to be read as “la dash a”, and the thrust of the story was always that we should laugh at how absurd that is. I believe that people were compelled to share this with me as a way of finding a shared topical space with me, and a “fun” one at that. “You teach? Let me tell you this funny teacher story!” It was almost always done in a way that was inviting — a commiseration on a common ground.

    Occasionally the subtext was heavier and more mean-spirited: that the person who named La-a was ignorant or uneducated, that the person naming La-a was eroding the English language, or that it’s presumptuous for people to want a name like La-a pronounced correctly. These implications were less common and certainly troubling, but what was honestly more troubling was that I had this same story come up so many different times that I was even able to see its myriad angles in the first place.

    The actual story of La-a is a likely untrue but definitely racist apocryphal story (note: this article uses the spelling “Le-a”). Whether or not the story was actually true is mostly irrelevant though, because it was believed to be true, and it took hold of people’s attention in a powerful way. It was not a local phenomenon, nor a time-limited one. I have had people talk with me about La-a over the course of a decade, in multiple different cities, in multiple different states. I’m confident enough in the story’s social omnipresence that I’d wager that many of the other American users on this site have heard it themselves.

    The first couple of times it happened I just kind of chuckled along and mentioned that, yeah, I had some students with some unique names too. It wasn’t until it kept coming up over and over again that I started to get aggravated by it. The story of La-a and, by proxy, my students with unique names, weren’t ever looked at fondly. Nobody ever said that her name was clever or memorable or interesting or unique in a positive way. Instead, the person talking with me was always assuming I was equally judgmental of the name’s perceived absurdity or vanity.

    After a couple of years at that school and in that community, I started to get really bothered by this, especially because I’d come to deeply care about my students and especially because I had a mental list of “awesome names” that I thought were so, so cool on account of their novelty or construction. I had a student whose first name was a full, complete sentence. It’s unique enough that to type it here would be identifying, but it was also clever enough and meaningful enough that it worked as a name.

    And, with her, nobody even batted an eye. It was her name. Simple as that. Nobody ever laughed at her or questioned her about her name or implied her parents were unintelligent or presumptuous. It was her name, the fundamental unit and label of who she was, and we accepted that. Why wouldn’t we? It’s a courtesy we afford to literally everyone else. Why should she be an exception?

    Names are mundane things (everyone has one) until they’re not. They’re not mundane when they mean something to us — when they represent who we are. They’re also not mundane when they’re used against us. Everyone knows the feeling of their own name being spoken from a frustrated, angry, or disappointed mouth, for example.

    The story of La-a isn’t about a name as a mundane thing. It’s not about a girl who goes by a name which is something that everyone has. It’s instead the story of using a name against someone.

    To see that, we have to see the parallel story — the untold one that lives in her name. It’s the story of the people who talk about La-a and what they choose to say about her. They choose not to empathize with someone who might take pride in their unique name and identity. They choose not to approach her name with curiosity or reverence for its clever construction. They choose not to afford her the bare minimum of respect and allow her the dignity and respect of her own name. Instead, they choose to judge her or the person who named her.

    And always implied but never directly stated in the story is that we’re not judging them in isolation: we’re judging people like La-a.

    You know: black people.

    Commiserating about La-a was a racist act taking the most benign, insulated form. It was white people commiserating with white me about one of “those” black names. For contrast, I work in a predominantly white area now and no one has ever asked me about “weird names” in my current school or brought up for a laugh what Grimes or Gwyneth Paltrow named their children. I also have no doubt that if I were black, I never would have found myself in the position of having white people constantly wanting to laugh at La-a with me — because every person sharing that story knew its subtext but thought it was fine as long as we didn’t say that part out loud.

    When you do say that part, it takes the fun out. Even makes people angry a bit — especially if the word “racist” comes up. In my first conversations about La-a I played along: “yeah, I have some students with unique names too”. In later ones, I still accepted the story but reframed it: “yeah, I think that name is clever, and I have lots of students like her with really cool names too!”. By now it’s rare that it comes up, but if it does, I just tell it like it is: “you know that story is a racist fiction, right?”

    The latter is the least fun. It shuts down the party. Everybody was having a grand old time, all lighthearted and laughing, until I had to go and be all serious and judgmental about things, right? Why’d I have to do that, huh?

    I had to do that because I’m tired of abiding someone else’s judgments in the name of fun, and because I’m tired of La-a being white people’s way of quietly othering black people and not affording them a base level of dignity. I’m tired of white people being so passively disrespectful that they will openly laugh at someone’s name and then have the gall to feel that they’re the ones aggrieved when people don’t laugh along with them. But honestly, more than anything else, I’m tired of white people not even realizing there’s a problem in the first place.

    La-a might be a real person, or she might not be. That doesn’t really matter that much, because regardless of whether or not she is real, our society’s mockery of her surely is. When I point that out, I generate friction — a social trouble that almost always pulls more focus than the overlooked and long-standing friction of using her name as a quietly racist referendum in the first place. That’s the parallel story to La-a’s name. The one that we don’t say out loud, but we know is there all the same. The one that intersects with all those other stories and assumptions and judgments we put on people like La-a, whether consciously or not.

    This Basecamp story started with a list of names as laughs. It ended with blowup of a meeting and a third of their workforce leaving. Is that because some people just couldn’t take a joke? Or was it because that joke and other events and interactions had their own parallel stories — ones that maybe weren’t spoken out loud but that still said something significant all the same?

    20 votes
  17. Comment on Inside the all-hands meeting that led to a third of Basecamp employees quitting in ~tech

    kfwyre
    Link Parent
    I thought the same thing. Kudos to that employee for their skill in communicating that, especially with the clear tensions present on the call and in the staff culture.

    I thought the same thing. Kudos to that employee for their skill in communicating that, especially with the clear tensions present on the call and in the staff culture.

    13 votes
  18. Comment on MASTER BOOT RECORD - WAREZ (full album playlist, 2020) in ~music

    kfwyre
    Link Parent
    Thanks for the ░ ▒ ▓ █ recommendation. I just listened through it and it’s excellent! Love the kinetic and at times frantic piano work.

    Thanks for the ░ ▒ ▓ █ recommendation. I just listened through it and it’s excellent! Love the kinetic and at times frantic piano work.

    2 votes