aphoenix's recent activity

  1. Comment on 2020 Doomsday Clock Announcement (100 seconds to midnight) in ~news

    aphoenix
    Link Parent
    Again my tone: confused, trying to figure out what I said to misrepresent what I meant to this degree. The thing you quoted is my explicit statement of my understanding that the doomsday clock is...

    Again my tone: confused, trying to figure out what I said to misrepresent what I meant to this degree.

    I don't think we're literally seconds from dooms day (otherwise the clock has been inaccurate for the entirety of it's 50+ year existence)

    I based my reply mainly on this, which suggested to me that you looked at the doomsday clock as representing real seconds to doomsday.

    The thing you quoted is my explicit statement of my understanding that the doomsday clock is a metaphor. "I don't think we're literally seconds from dooms day". I am not following how my explicitly spelling out that I understand that it is a metaphor convinced you that I did not think this was a metaphor.

    You find that unwarranted to such degree that determined you to write multiple paragraphs multiple posts. Why?

    I'm also not sure what arguments you think I am vehemently making against the Bulletin? To be clear: I am a donating member OF the Bulletin. I think the things they write need to be read by more people, especially the world leaders. What have I said that makes you think otherwise? What arguments have I made against them?

    2 votes
  2. Comment on 2020 Doomsday Clock Announcement (100 seconds to midnight) in ~news

    aphoenix
    Link Parent
    Before we continue, I want to clarify the intended tone: I am curious, and in no way aggravated. What thing did I say that indicates to you that I have a problem with this metaphor? I feel like I...

    Before we continue, I want to clarify the intended tone: I am curious, and in no way aggravated.

    What thing did I say that indicates to you that I have a problem with this metaphor? I feel like I explained that I've been following the writings of the Bulletin for 25 years; I think anyone who has read this article or any of the other ones would have a very clear understanding of the metaphor.

    2 votes
  3. Comment on 2020 Doomsday Clock Announcement (100 seconds to midnight) in ~news

    aphoenix
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    Which commenters seem to be taking this as an objective future prediction? Do you mean mine? It's the only one that seems like it could be the case. It's important to note that I don't think of...

    Which commenters seem to be taking this as an objective future prediction? Do you mean mine? It's the only one that seems like it could be the case.

    It's important to note that I don't think of this as an objective future prediction, but I've been "watching the clock" since about 1995. The pieces they put out are almost always a good read, and the people that work at the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists are generally pretty smart, and I respect what they're saying. I don't think we're literally seconds from doomsday (otherwise the clock has been inaccurate for the entirety of it's 50+ year existence), but I think that we are not doing very well as a civilization at this particular point in time.

    I do think that it's possible that there will be a set of circumstances that will change the earth so much that this planet will no longer support humans. I'm hopeful that we'll have achieved the ability to leave, or that the looming crises can be averted, but I don't think that it's an overstatement to say that we're closer to finishing ourselves off than ever before.

    4 votes
  4. Comment on 2020 Doomsday Clock Announcement (100 seconds to midnight) in ~news

    aphoenix
    Link
    For reference, the history of the clock. We are now closer than ever to ending humanity. I mean, not us personally, but the people who actually do stuff. Vladimir Putin, Donald Trump, Xi Jinping....

    For reference, the history of the clock.

    We are now closer than ever to ending humanity.

    I mean, not us personally, but the people who actually do stuff. Vladimir Putin, Donald Trump, Xi Jinping. These are not the only people, but the three who most obviously teeter us on the brink of destruction.

    I have no power to do anything about the state of the world beyond what I already do. I hope that we survive, somehow, because I love my kids and want them to have the same sort of life that I've lead - a life measured, at this point, in "minutes to midnight". How bleak is it that this is my goal for my children; to live at "minutes to midnight" instead of seconds?

    6 votes
  5. Comment on Town Meeting in ~talk

    aphoenix
    Link Parent
    I originally learned about it via the Gilmore Girls, where it plays a role in several episodes.

    I originally learned about it via the Gilmore Girls, where it plays a role in several episodes.

    4 votes
  6. Comment on What are you doing this week? in ~talk

    aphoenix
    Link
    Leisure: D&D tonight - the first session of the new year! A recap will be necessary because I don't really remember at what point of intrigue we are at! Ny'alotha Raid (World of Warcraft) opens on...

    Leisure:

    D&D tonight - the first session of the new year! A recap will be necessary because I don't really remember at what point of intrigue we are at!

    Ny'alotha Raid (World of Warcraft) opens on Tuesday, so we'll be doing that T/Th nights for a while.

    My new resin 3d printer should arrive this week, so I'll be building an enclosure / venting system, and figuring out how to actual print with resin.

    Dad-related: I'll be driving kids to and from various activities all through the week.

    Work:

    Have a fun little SPA project that I'm working on for launch on Wednesday. I'm introducing one of our junior devs to angular, and helping him to work through some issues right now.

    4 votes
  7. Comment on Is it really just sexism? An alternative argument for why women leave STEM in ~tech

    aphoenix
    Link
    This is an interesting piece, with some interesting ideas. I haven't done the research this person has done, but my wife is a professor in rehabilitation science, so I guess she's in that...

    This is an interesting piece, with some interesting ideas. I haven't done the research this person has done, but my wife is a professor in rehabilitation science, so I guess she's in that relatively small percentage of women who have stuck around. She was able to do so for a few reasons:

    • we have great family support; my mother picks up the kids from school every day.
    • we have had the benefit of flexibility, both in my working hours and her study (and then work) hours.
    • we have a very supportive country - Canada provides up to a year of parental leave, for mothers or fathers (or mix and match)
    • We have been lucky with finding exceptional child care.

    Without the familial support network, the exceptional daycare, and the work flexibility, she would not have been able to reach this point in her career. I think that to "make it" you probably need at least 3 of these 4 things, and for most people in, say, the USA, they are missing one (paid family leave) right off the bat, so a good first step would be figuring out parental leave.

    I think it's important to note that sexism is definitely still a problem that my wife faces with some frequency, and the only reason that it's not a contributing factor to her wanting to quit is because there's no job where it wouldn't be a problem, so you can't really opt out of sexism. Racism too, for that matter (my wife is a person of colour). These things are hard to deal with and still require constant work, but I think that maybe we're starting to get to the point where we really need to look at some of the other things, like work / family balance, to enable women to focus on their careers.

    14 votes
  8. Comment on Does anyone have any advice for preparing for a cross-country move? (BC, Canada -> Quebec, Canada) in ~life

    aphoenix
    Link Parent
    Trains are a great option. Transit times are relatively fast, and the comfort level is relatively high. I think planning for 5 hours of transit is about right. You can also catch a flight from...

    Trains are a great option. Transit times are relatively fast, and the comfort level is relatively high. I think planning for 5 hours of transit is about right.

    You can also catch a flight from Montreal to Toronto for as little as double if you plan well in advance and flying from Montreal to Toronto and back is really easy; you could plan for about 2 hours of transit if you flew.

    There are also lots of ride shares available, and that's just a bit longer than the train, though I'd avoid it in the winter.

    Transit's generally pretty great in the Southern Ontario / Southern Quebec corridor.

    3 votes
  9. Comment on Does anyone have any advice for preparing for a cross-country move? (BC, Canada -> Quebec, Canada) in ~life

    aphoenix
    Link
    At 21, I moved from near Toronto to Vancouver; at 22, I moved from Vancouver to near Toronto. That was half my life ago, but I think i remember enough to give some advice. Ruthlessly prune the...

    At 21, I moved from near Toronto to Vancouver; at 22, I moved from Vancouver to near Toronto. That was half my life ago, but I think i remember enough to give some advice.

    • Ruthlessly prune the stuff you have. Get rid of things you don't use on a weekly basis.
    • Consider getting rid of your furniture and just buying new furniture after moving
    • Think about driving and doing it all within Canada. Canada is beautiful. This could be a leisurely way to spend a week, especially if you're moving with somebody.
    • You can sublet a place for 4 months, sight unseen, via the internet. Use that time to find a more permanent location once you've moved.
    • This bears repeating: ruthlessly prune your belongings. Get rid of things. It will make life easier.
    • Before you move: spend some time with the ocean, the trees, the mountains... or whatever it is about BC that you love. Those are the things that I still miss, even though I only lived out there for a year.
    • Brush up on your french. Get duolingo or something, and practice every day. You do not need french to survive in Montreal, but every time I go there, I find people generally are friendlier if I start a conversation in french.
    • Quebec City is one of my favourite cities of all time. Great food, great beer, great history, great people. Even if you don't move, it's worth visiting.
    • Once you have moved, get a library card.
    • Check out local get togethers for whatever your interests are - local meetups about software engineering, or maker groups, or poetry slams, or open mic nights. Just something to connect with people around you. You might feel disconnected for a while.
    • Be RUTHLESS with your stuff.

    That's most of my advice off the top of my head.

    12 votes
  10. Comment on A Sad Day For Rust in ~comp

    aphoenix
    Link Parent
    If I had to guess, I'd wager that he will not. The cycle of releasing an open source project all too frequently goes like this: get excited about something and write some code for it release the...

    I hope the developer returns to developing open source some day

    If I had to guess, I'd wager that he will not. The cycle of releasing an open source project all too frequently goes like this:

    • get excited about something and write some code for it
    • release the source
    • work to fix the issues that people bring up, merge pull requests, be engaged
    • ignore the trolls
    • some flashpoint that consists of a non-trivial amount of angry people about something you no longer have time to fix quickly
    • personal attacks
    • personal attacks ++
    • personal attacks all the way down
    • close the fucking project and forget about it

    Don't get me wrong, I love Open Source, but there are just too many assholes.

    15 votes
  11. Comment on What is a good free alternative to Wordpress that requires little coding? in ~comp

    aphoenix
    Link Parent
    It wouldn't be a wiki - the definition of a wiki is that it has collaborative editing built into the front facing web site- but you could add search and links are supported out of the box. There's...

    It wouldn't be a wiki - the definition of a wiki is that it has collaborative editing built into the front facing web site- but you could add search and links are supported out of the box.

    There's an article about implementing search and making links is as simple as just putting them in markdown like I've just done here to create a link, though you could omit the protocol and domain:

    [link text](/path/to/page.html)
    

    You can do this in Tildes as well: my user page

    [my user page](/user/aphoenix)
    

    (Forming your links like this would be useful if you intend to use the content on multiple sites with different domains).

    1 vote
  12. Comment on What is a good free alternative to Wordpress that requires little coding? in ~comp

    aphoenix
    Link Parent
    IMO: yours is the correct answer. To get specific: Hugo is a pretty good option. You can use EasyHugo to post directly to Hugo from emacs. @mrbig

    IMO: yours is the correct answer.

    To get specific: Hugo is a pretty good option.

    You can use EasyHugo to post directly to Hugo from emacs.

    @mrbig

    8 votes
  13. Comment on How do you people at universities handle your notes? in ~talk

    aphoenix
    Link Parent
    from @patience_limited's comment below is a better, more thoughtful writeup of the issues.

    I have tried a RocketBook, as /u/aphoenix mentioned, but I truly hate the special ink pens required, as well as the inability to edit scans easily. There's Rocket OCR, but it doesn't work at all well with my handwriting. The pens aren't as finely pointed and precise as I like (my favorite pen these days is a Pigma Micron 0.35 mm). I can't avoid smearing the water-soluble ink with my hands, the pages seem to have a magical affinity for coffee droplets. The surface doesn't quite behave like paper, so my handwriting suffers.

    from @patience_limited's comment below is a better, more thoughtful writeup of the issues.

    2 votes
  14. Comment on What are your unpopular game opinions? in ~games

    aphoenix
    Link Parent
    The current iteration of World of Warcraft includes a lot of quality of life changes that are helpful for people who want to play the game without devoting 100 hours a month to it. On top of that,...

    The current iteration of World of Warcraft includes a lot of quality of life changes that are helpful for people who want to play the game without devoting 100 hours a month to it. On top of that, raid designs have improved immensely; raids in classic wow were pretty terrible, with the challenge mostly consisting of getting 40 people to look at the same thing and show up. Raids now are much more challenging and interesting.

    The story has also matured significantly; the story team has a much more cohesive idea of what they're doing. It's cheesy, but it can be compelling; if you haven't watched the Saurfang cinematics from the recent expansion, they're actually a nice little micro-story.

    The perception of "difficulty" in classic wow is mostly about levelling and not about end game content, but a significant number of people actually don't enjoy the levelling process; even in classic it's disjoint, and the story is wonky. The experience of levelling is less painful in current WoW, and will improve in the next expansion.

    Overall, classic WoW is a fun time, but current WoW is just... better, in almost every measurable way.

    5 votes
  15. Comment on What are your unpopular game opinions? in ~games

    aphoenix
    Link
    Current WoW is better than WoW classic, by a huge amount.

    Current WoW is better than WoW classic, by a huge amount.

    6 votes
  16. Comment on How do you people at universities handle your notes? in ~talk

    aphoenix
    Link Parent
    It took me a while to get used to the page constraints, and sometimes the scans don't pick up things that I think they should pick up. I have pretty neat handwriting, but the OCR sometimes has...

    It took me a while to get used to the page constraints, and sometimes the scans don't pick up things that I think they should pick up. I have pretty neat handwriting, but the OCR sometimes has problems as well.

    Overall, it's a very good purchase for under 40 bucks. I definitely recommend it.

    3 votes
  17. Comment on How do you people at universities handle your notes? in ~talk

    aphoenix
    Link Parent
    The rocketbook works fairly well; it's not quite as seemless as I want it to be. I will admit that I still have paper notebooks as well; all my personal stuff is done in paper notebooks, notably...

    The rocketbook works fairly well; it's not quite as seemless as I want it to be. I will admit that I still have paper notebooks as well; all my personal stuff is done in paper notebooks, notably because I still have dozens of them that I've received as gifts over the years (I got a big pack of World of Warcraft themed ones, and they're great).

    Until recently, I kept production journals in paper. I have a format that I wrote in every day (perhaps irrelevant to academia, but it was "summary of yesterday's issues" and then "plan for today", and each section had some breakdowns by client - I still do this in the Rocketbook) and I think subscribing to a particular format is worthwhile. What that format is would be a personal choice; when I did my degree, I tended to keep about 30% of the page on the left clear so I could write a summary there, and take most of my notes in the 70% on the right. I found this useful for going back and revising.

    I used to use colour coded tabs to mark projects in a particular way, so I could easily reference things and I think this is transferable to academia, and can be very useful. I didn't do this while at school though.

    3 votes
  18. Comment on What's your daily routine like? in ~talk

    aphoenix
    Link Parent
    Being done at noon seems amazing. In grade school, we didnt' finish here until 4pm, and high school was 3:15. Having most of the day still in front of you after school sounds great.

    Being done at noon seems amazing. In grade school, we didnt' finish here until 4pm, and high school was 3:15. Having most of the day still in front of you after school sounds great.

    3 votes
  19. Comment on What's your daily routine like? in ~talk

    aphoenix
    Link
    For reference, I am a 40 year old man living in Canada in a moderately affluent household; I work as a developer, my wife is a professor, and we have three children. This is what a weekday...

    For reference, I am a 40 year old man living in Canada in a moderately affluent household; I work as a developer, my wife is a professor, and we have three children. This is what a weekday generally looks like for me:

    • 7:51am - wake up, praise be to alarm clocks
    • 8:00am - daily ablutions (shower, beard maintenance, deodorant, teeth, etc) and then get dressed
    • 8:25am - get the kids into the minivan and head out
    • 8:30am - drop my kids at school
    • 8:35am - pick up my coworker / brother-in-law
    • 8:40am - stop for black coffee (for me) and tea (coworker)
    • 8:50am-ish - optional: stop at one pokestop on the way to work (yes, I realize I'm 40)
    • 9:15 am - arrive at work and do daily prep - review tickets and stories, look at pull requests, check email, look at production schedule, etc.
    • 10:00am - daily huddle - identify issues / problems, highlight important things that need to be done
    • 10:15am - brain break
    • 10:20am - work
    • 11:45am - break for lunch. I usually go to a diner for lunch. Overeasy eggs, sausage, rye toast, hashbrowns, water to drink. This is my big meal of the day. It's notable that I try to only consume calories between roughly noon and 6:30pm.
    • 12:05 pm - back to work, make coffee, play a few games of foosball while discussing project work with brother-in-law
    • 12:45pm - work
    • in roughly 45 minute increments, I schedule a short break (this is one of them)
    • 5:15pm - leave work
    • 5:50pm - drop brother-in-law at home
    • 6:00pm - get home, hug children, kiss wife, etc
    • 6:15pm - dinner (for me typically just some vegetables and protein)
    • 6:30pm - chores / drive a kid somewhere / spend time with my son
    • 7:15pm - son's bedtime (help him with pyjamas, ablutions, read stories)
    • 7:30pm - play a game or do something with my wife and daughters
    • 8:15pm - younger daughter's bedtime (read stories)
    • 8:30pm - free time for myself
    • 1:30am (or earlier) - go to bed

    That 5 hours of free time is when I do most of the things that are for myself; they include:

    • working out
    • playing games
    • making something (3d printing, home coding project, etc)
    • doing some kind of home improvement (fixing drywall is a common one right now)
    • watch TV or play a 2 player game with my wife (or 3p with wife + oldest daughter if she is interested)

    This is just a typical day - I have atypical days as well, where an entire evening is spent playing D&D, or doing home repairs, or driving kids around to lots of different things.

    5 votes