knocklessmonster's recent activity

  1. Comment on For aeropress, which one is the better upgrade: better grinder or temperature control kettle? in ~food

    knocklessmonster
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    Yeah, I mean dial it in, especially since OP is talking about two similarly priced grinders. My comment was written when I'd somehow thought the OP was referring to a $300 manual grinder.

    Yeah, I mean dial it in, especially since OP is talking about two similarly priced grinders.

    My comment was written when I'd somehow thought the OP was referring to a $300 manual grinder.

  2. Comment on For aeropress, which one is the better upgrade: better grinder or temperature control kettle? in ~food

    knocklessmonster
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    Any hand grinder review is usually going to be against hand grinders, which all have varying wobble issues. The best minimize them, but powder happens. Any electric burr grinder will be more...

    Any hand grinder review is usually going to be against hand grinders, which all have varying wobble issues. The best minimize them, but powder happens. Any electric burr grinder will be more consistent than a hand grinder because the motor only moves in two dimensions.

    I also somehow took a wrong turn and found a $350 grinder looking it up, but I would still say it would be better to learn the great grinder one has on hand, and focus on finding the perfect grind, especially if one is simply looking at another grinder in the same price point as what one already has.

    1 vote
  3. Comment on For aeropress, which one is the better upgrade: better grinder or temperature control kettle? in ~food

    knocklessmonster
    Link Parent
    A good rule of thumb I've found for tea and coffee is when your water gets loud (you'll hear it), your water is ready, and somewhere around 165-180. The size of the bubbles on the sides of the...

    A good rule of thumb I've found for tea and coffee is when your water gets loud (you'll hear it), your water is ready, and somewhere around 165-180. The size of the bubbles on the sides of the kettle also sort of indicates temperature, but you can Google that. Typically you don't want boiling water (I'm not sure of when Hoffman says to ever use it that hot), but you can get away with it.

    Run your kettle and listen for it to start going WOOOSSSHHHHH. If you take the temperature at this point you should be somewhere between 165-180.

    1 vote
  4. Comment on For aeropress, which one is the better upgrade: better grinder or temperature control kettle? in ~food

    knocklessmonster
    Link Parent
    Unless you need a top-notch travel setup you may be better served by something like a Baratza Sette 30 for around $300. It's a "starter" grinder but it also removes your hand from the equation. If...

    Unless you need a top-notch travel setup you may be better served by something like a Baratza Sette 30 for around $300. It's a "starter" grinder but it also removes your hand from the equation. If you're getting serious about coffee you'll likely be getting an electric anyway, so you may as well make the jump now.

    1 vote
  5. Comment on For aeropress, which one is the better upgrade: better grinder or temperature control kettle? in ~food

    knocklessmonster
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    Grind first, temperature can be less precise than you expect, 5-10 degrees of temperature will have less effect than notches/dots/however a certain grinder is indexed, and the resultant grind...

    Grind first, temperature can be less precise than you expect, 5-10 degrees of temperature will have less effect than notches/dots/however a certain grinder is indexed, and the resultant grind size. Also, it will come down to what you think tastes good anyway. But the best adjustment is to get the grind right, especially for a novice. I'm not particularly advanced and keep my budget small (Aeropress, Hario Skeleton with a brace mod that has been incorporated into the new skeleton. Across methods I use from pour-over, Hario V60 (slightly different, faster pourover), moka and Turkish pot, grind, IMO, is the biggest thing to affect quality.

    I don't know anything about the super expensive grinder you're referring to (I Googled it and saw the price), but my point is simple: grind will have the biggest effect, temperature second. As a novice you should probably just with with what you have to find what tastes best, as well.

    EDIT: I stand by my opinion, but was under the impression OP was referring to an expensive hand grinder. The recommendation of an electric is irrelevant, but that would be a grinder I would recommend.

    10 votes
  6. Comment on What did you do this week? in ~talk

    knocklessmonster
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    Finals! Failed one, but it was intentionally weighted to not be important, so I passed that class with a B still, and would've had a B+ at best, so I'm happy. I'm waiting on the other, but that...

    Finals! Failed one, but it was intentionally weighted to not be important, so I passed that class with a B still, and would've had a B+ at best, so I'm happy. I'm waiting on the other, but that professor has to grade 20 16-page reports and a bunch of other stuff, so I'll get it this weekend.

    29-hour train ride to Salem, Oregon. It was an hour to Los Angeles, an hour wait, then 27 hours on the Amtrak Coast Starlight, with about 20 of them being spent going up California.

    The ride was... Interesting. Saw a lot of walls, the industrial backbone of southern California, and coast up to San Luis Obispo, tons of chaparral wild areas, then farms as we cut inland and did a lot of reading. I got a couple whiskeys (1oz Jack Daniels), popped a melatonin at 11PM and... Woke up at 1:30. Read until my eyes were heavy went back to sleep and woke up at again at 5:30 looking at northern California's pine forests. I was going to watch the sun rise, but a bunch of people were camped out sleeping in the observation car (Coach and business class are rough sleeping, I was in business) so I watched it through the windows around my car. I managed to watch Mt. Shasta and have my cup of coffee, which was pretty cool, then I went back to catching up on lost sleep until a couple hours before getting to Salem.

    As an aside, a face mask, sleep mask and blanket combo is super cozy without overheating. I wound up wearing my face mask partially out of COVID concerns, but also to sidestep irritation from the air conditioner.

    3 votes
  7. Comment on What are your linguistic idiosyncrasies? in ~talk

    knocklessmonster
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    I used to think it was funny to act angry and say really silly things, like a mock tirade about who why the salt shaker in the fridge, but I started doing it less because it doesn't land well when...

    I used to think it was funny to act angry and say really silly things, like a mock tirade about who why the salt shaker in the fridge, but I started doing it less because it doesn't land well when you're dealing with my family, who have all been shouted at by their previous generation and have issues with tone, myself included. Let's call that my faux pas, but I'm getting better at doing tHe SaRcAsTiC vOiCe.

    Do you have certain words or phrasing patterns that you either love or avoid at all costs?

    As many contractions as I can get away with? "I ain't gonna go do dat, Imma head dis way." It's more of a "th" on the Ds, like rolling your R but for one pop, but if I find myself leaning into that way of speaking it sort of just flows quickly. It tends to be a more jokey tone, but isn't intended to be a stereotype or making fun of anybody/anything. I'd describe it as sort of a Jersey or Chicago accent on the way the consonants land, but with an accent somewhere between Ohio/Kentucky and California.

    Which leads me to my accent: I don't think I sound Californian. I don't mean the stereotypes that I've actually encountered, but the less distinctive generic sort of accent that could place me from any major city. It has a little bit of Ohio that rubbed off of my dad, I think. For non-Americans I'm not saying much here that would make much sense, I think. It's ever so slightly rural American, I guess.

    How do you adapt your patterns to different contexts (formal, informal, social, professional, etc)? Does that come easy for you?

    I code-switch, fully. I'm one way with my family and peers, a different way in a meeting with a manager or a customer at work. I swear like a sailor in person, less online, and almost never professionally even if others are because it doesn't make sense to, and I've been conditioned by my previous employer. I actually tend to talk in "business mode" like I write on Tildes (unless it's a more light-hearted topic here).

    Do you have a tendency to be overly formal? Conversely, are you often too informal, or use too much slang?

    I think I talk a few years younger than I am, but I've always been a bit immature for better or worse (not an excuse for any behavior, of course).

    Do you have an inner dialogue?

    Like me talking. It grew up as I did, and normalized to my ever-changing manner of speech. When I started relaxing into my lower register more, it started sitting down there more (that's a fairly recent thing for some reason, within the last couple years).

    I tend to over-explain myself, but that's not a speech thing. I also tend to sort of man-splain a lot, but not strictly to women, and mostly because I want to help, but don't know what the other persons' experiences are and change tack the moment that's cleared up.

    Not covered in the questionnaire is I tend to strive for precision in language. I say one thing and mean just the one thing which means I may have to change the word for it so it's more clear later. This also leads to me talking more than perhaps I should occasionally, but I generally don't have a lot to say, unless I find myself in a conversation of course.

    2 votes
  8. Comment on In the dating market, people compete ferociously for partners with qualities that do not increase their chances of romantic happiness in ~life

    knocklessmonster
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    It may be what the data reflects, but in any statistics course I took they banged the drum of "correlation does not mean causation." The justification makes sense, but I it feels like one of those...

    It may be what the data reflects, but in any statistics course I took they banged the drum of "correlation does not mean causation."

    The justification makes sense, but I it feels like one of those points that needs a *More Research Needed note.

    4 votes
  9. Comment on What’s a subculture you’re part of, and what insights can you give to outsiders about it? in ~talk

    knocklessmonster
    (edited )
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    Might it have been Gibber? It's the only fully fleshed out browser-based environment I can think of. And yeah, it grew quite a bit as I was getting into it, and seems to be growing steadily, if...

    Might it have been Gibber? It's the only fully fleshed out browser-based environment I can think of.

    And yeah, it grew quite a bit as I was getting into it, and seems to be growing steadily, if slowly.

    1 vote
  10. Comment on What’s a subculture you’re part of, and what insights can you give to outsiders about it? in ~talk

    knocklessmonster
    Link Parent
    I was there, too, and when I noticed it peeling right I sort of just didn't follow the logic. The Internet felt more conservative and edgy then, but around then things also started shifting.

    I forget how or when I dropped out of following that, but looking back I probably dodged an alt-right bullet.

    I was there, too, and when I noticed it peeling right I sort of just didn't follow the logic. The Internet felt more conservative and edgy then, but around then things also started shifting.

    4 votes
  11. Comment on What’s a subculture you’re part of, and what insights can you give to outsiders about it? in ~talk

    knocklessmonster
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    Algorave/livecoding. I'm not as active as I was when I started, but like to think I'm a peripheral member of this culture. I still play with it regularly as I do other instruments/methods of...

    Algorave/livecoding. I'm not as active as I was when I started, but like to think I'm a peripheral member of this culture. I still play with it regularly as I do other instruments/methods of music.

    It's one of the coolest things I've ever heard of or done. You're performing a piece of art live, but it's being executed by something else. Most people use a code environment like SuperCollider, or built on top of it like Tidalcycles, FoxDot, iXi, ChucK, or SonicPi, some people write their own custom systems, and others have their own esoteric methods of doing things. One person was pulling YouTube videos in windows to make a piece of music out of them all in a particularly memorable stream.

    I guess the important thing is it's about the art. There are many initiatives, internationally, to draw people from all backgrounds into the fold with specific focuses on groups that are underrepresented in technology (Women, LGBT+, BIPOC in regions they're underrepresented, etc) and a celebration of international cultures. Events are "hosted" from various countries for all sorts of uniquely culturally-connected events, and even then each of these is open to all comers.

    I'm more of a fly on the wall, watching streams, making music in my own little corner, sharing what I know when people ask questions if I stumble into a thread somewhere about something I know, but I came into this because it looked cool. I think this was the first video I ever saw of Benoit and the Mandelbrots, a Dutch group who worked with Supercollider, and it blew my mind. I watched videos, but didn't ask any questions thinking it was just developer stuff, it's way over my head. A few years later I learned about Sonic Pi, by Sam Aaron at University of Cambridge, written for the Raspberry Pi to teach programming through music, which was my first foray into it. I decided I wanted to finally get the hang of Supercollider itself, and Sean Cotterill wrote this badass guide on how he does it, which got me up and running in pure Supercollider + JITLib (the library in Supercollider that facilitates livecoding), and eventually moved to Tidalcycles, a Haskell-based language that is built to represent time as "cycles."

    My major misconception was you had to be a god-tier programmer to do this. You don't have to be technically inclined to do it, you just have to be willing to learn a little, like any instrument. If you pick and stick with a system you'll be quite proficient in it in a surprisingly short time. If all else fails you can duct tape some cool parts together to customize a system and do cool stuff with it.

    I think this scene and hobby is great for the reasons Sean Cotterill described in his guide here, and particularly loved that it was all free software. I sort of stumbled into it trying to write my own generative music in Renoise, so found the notion of being able to do randomly performed pieces in a tool like Sonic Pi was great when I started, and everything grew from there. It is a liberating way of making music and nobody cares if what you make isn't objectively "good," because the goal is to experiment and make some noise.

    12 votes
  12. Comment on What did you do this week? in ~talk

    knocklessmonster
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    Carried a group report across the finish line on a 4loko (non-US folks, it's a malt liquor drink, the can I had was 14% alcohol at 20 oz/600ml). I didn't intend this, I thought we were just...

    Carried a group report across the finish line on a 4loko (non-US folks, it's a malt liquor drink, the can I had was 14% alcohol at 20 oz/600ml). I didn't intend this, I thought we were just reading the report, signing off on it, and whatnot, so I'd popped it open at 9, and wound up working on it until 11:30 with my classmates, tracking down missing citations, dropping a couple (both were in one paragraph we just cut, it didn't interrupt the flow). I can't tell my classmates about this, because I don't want them to think I was drunk when i did it, but I also low-key was. It was frustrating, but we got it in, and it's a good paper aside from the mistakes we had. The content was great, but the citations and minor details needed a ton of work.

    I went on a drive with my brother to get used to driving at night on Wednesday, which is just driving tbh. It's about building confidence more than anything. We took a longer road with more twists and turns than I expected, but he wasn't stomping the floor on his side of my car, so I did alright.

    The rest has been studying for my coming finals on Monday, which I'll be doing through the weekend as well.

    2 votes
  13. Comment on Give me your party music! in ~music

    knocklessmonster
    (edited )
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    I'll pull albums and recommend a couple tracks, unless a whole EP is bangers. Early dubstep. It doesn't match the vibe you're putting out, but it also might. IDK. Skream - : Rutten Rusko - Babylon...

    I'll pull albums and recommend a couple tracks, unless a whole EP is bangers.

    Early dubstep. It doesn't match the vibe you're putting out, but it also might. IDK.

    Skream - : Rutten

    Rusko - Babylon Vol 2 and Mr Chips, not a lot of material, but it's sort more of a dub vibe than later dubstep.

    I guess to turn you on to stuff to more easily fold into your lists:

    Mike Huckaby - The Defenders of the Deep House World, deep house: You can probably expand into each of his collaborators' discographies and find gold.

    Legowelt makes great stuff on the sliding scale between house and techno. I'd start with Legendary Freaks in the Trash of Time and Crystal Cult 2080. Skip to about the middle of tracks to see how they develop. Being techno, it all comes and goes, but peaks in the middle usually.

    Ceephax Acid Crew - Box Steady is fully-developed (anti-minimalist, I guess?) acid techno that may not align with what may be on your list. You could probably expand out to his other stuff, like Camelot Arcade, but earlier stuff like United Acid Emirates is a bit more plasticky sounding, but I'd recommend Commuter for a track with the best vibe on the whole thing.

    3 votes
  14. Comment on Right to perceive in ~talk

    knocklessmonster
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    In that specific context I would assume it's that they don't want you using a radar scanner because its purpose is to enable you to circumvent speeding laws by finding where cops are, and possibly...

    In that specific context I would assume it's that they don't want you using a radar scanner because its purpose is to enable you to circumvent speeding laws by finding where cops are, and possibly alerting others to their presence, or diverting to an area without cops to continue speeding. The justification is weak at best, but "the law is the law." It's not the radar, it's everything else.

    Where "perception" doesn't interact with other laws or actions, such as speeding, or organizations, like law enforcement trying to speed, radio reception is not an issue. I can get a shortwave receiver for $20 on Amazon and listen to whatever broadcast I want, whether it's Joe the Licensed HAM Operator two streets over, or the recording of Comrade Yuri reading off numbers to activate a sleeper cell in Venezuela.

    Any major law and regulation about radio stuff, AFAIK from when I've looked into it out of curiosity, is mostly about transmission to ensure the waves are clear for licensed operators (Broadcasters, military, emergency services, licensed amateurs, etc), and so we know who is doing what, where, and when but we don't really have laws about what you can pick up, except again for these interactions with other activities.

    I guess we can think of airwaves as something of an electromagnetic commons: You have a right to be there, but regulations are in place to ensure you don't burn it down or put cones across it to stop others from crossing. When you want to hold an obstructing event, like send a HAM broadcast or a concert in the park, you need a permit, but to listen to the broadcast or attend the show, you just need to listen.

    EDIT: This is US-centric, at least legally, but most minimally functioning liberal democracies are similar AFAIK. "Rights" come in when your country wants to block, say, BBC World Service over shortwave. I would contend a right to stand in the EM common exists, and would be violated by this law. Similarly for the radar scanner law, the reception shouldn't be an issue, as long as you aren't jamming the guns.

    3 votes
  15. Comment on What's something that you're pretty sure of, but can't really prove or demonstrate? in ~talk

    knocklessmonster
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    My greatest comfort is knowing that for some reason advertisers are more aggressive after I've already bought the thing. It really demonstrates that they aren't tracking me that close.

    My greatest comfort is knowing that for some reason advertisers are more aggressive after I've already bought the thing. It really demonstrates that they aren't tracking me that close.

    4 votes
  16. Comment on About those kill-switched Ukrainian tractors in ~tech

    knocklessmonster
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    When I heard about this I had two thoughts: "Cool" "Hey... wait a second..." It was precisely this issue: Why could John Deere shut down the tractors? They could've before the Russians took them,...

    When I heard about this I had two thoughts:

    "Cool"

    "Hey... wait a second..."

    It was precisely this issue: Why could John Deere shut down the tractors? They could've before the Russians took them, obviously, which meant this mechanism was in place for people who had paid for their hardware.

    I'm not new to the issue, of course, but it's one of those things that makes a great headline, but looks scary when you poke at it. And Doctrow, from what I understand of his usual style, does a great job explaining it in detail, as well as the broader ramifications of these technologies.

    6 votes
  17. Comment on What games have you been playing, and what's your opinion on them? in ~games

    knocklessmonster
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    I'm progressing in Death Stranding. The mountains are tough, and I can't finish my zipline network because of bandwidth issues, which is frustrating, because I've got one prepper to connect with...

    I'm progressing in Death Stranding. The mountains are tough, and I can't finish my zipline network because of bandwidth issues, which is frustrating, because I've got one prepper to connect with one more zipline.

    Sim City 2000: I've had a hankering for this game for a while, but was unsure the best way to play it (using. I have it on GOG using DOSBox, but I've had that go wrong on me before. I decided to get the Special Edition, and found a copy that fell off a truck to roll my own install using DOSBox-X. It's everything I remember, but also slightly boring, but I'll see how far I go with it. I played a lot of 2000 and 3000 back in the day, but 2000 is my favorite one because it's so simple. I found this hack that does a good job of installing the game for you, but prefer how the DOS version is a bit more portable.

    3 votes
  18. Comment on Ncuti Gatwa: BBC names actor as next Doctor Who star in ~tv

    knocklessmonster
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    Ncuti is 30, Matt Smith is still the youngest at 28 it seems.

    Ncuti is 30, Matt Smith is still the youngest at 28 it seems.

    5 votes
  19. Comment on Mechanical watch in ~science

    knocklessmonster
    (edited )
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    Automatic watches (the ones with the weight that winds them) are why I'm at all into watches anyway. Watches and clocks are really cool mechanisms to study in general anyway.

    Automatic watches (the ones with the weight that winds them) are why I'm at all into watches anyway. Watches and clocks are really cool mechanisms to study in general anyway.

    3 votes
  20. Comment on What games have you been playing, and what's your opinion on them? in ~games

    knocklessmonster
    Link Parent
    Another one of those weeks where I shake something off of my wishlist: STRAFE: Gold Edition, it was on sale with the Devolver Digital sale. I almost don't like how the name looks like Strife, but...

    Another one of those weeks where I shake something off of my wishlist: STRAFE: Gold Edition, it was on sale with the Devolver Digital sale.

    I almost don't like how the name looks like Strife, but it's a superficial thing. If you've ever thought "Gee, a randomized Doom would be fun," this is a step in that direction. Yeah, it's 3D with an aesthetic like a fully pixelized Quake, but it plays more like Doom with jumping, mouselook and 3d models. No bhop, it's a bit slower paced, and constant movement is key, from the two levels I've played.

    2 votes