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    1. I'm curious as to what the Tildes Linux/BSD community (and I suppose other answers like Windows or MacOS would be acceptable, though they may feel a bit more dry) use for their desktop. I imagine...

      I'm curious as to what the Tildes Linux/BSD community (and I suppose other answers like Windows or MacOS would be acceptable, though they may feel a bit more dry) use for their desktop. I imagine that Ubuntu and Gnome will dominate the answers as you would expect, but maybe you'll surprise me. Personally, I'm on Arch Linux with i3-gaps. I use Arch because I enjoy the DIY aspect of Linux as well as the aur and slim nature of Arch. I'd also be lying if I didn't say I use it partially just because I like the "pacman" pun.

      As for i3-gaps, I think that WMs are generally more customizable and good for 'ricing', plus they go with my workflow and are convenient in that they load faster and the likes, though I have to admit I have only ever used i3 (I've been considering trying out bspwm). So, what do you guys use? You can also of course share more information such as your shell or DM if you wanted, though I highly doubt anyone cares what display manager you us or anything.

      25 votes
    2. Just a bit curious. Currently, mine looks like this. It runs Elementary OS, however considering hijacking it to Bedrock Linux, mainly to get cutting edge software from the AUR (for stuff like...

      Just a bit curious. Currently, mine looks like this. It runs Elementary OS, however considering hijacking it to Bedrock Linux, mainly to get cutting edge software from the AUR (for stuff like Firefox and GIMP) without losing all my data. I think I'll wait for Bedrock to go stable first, though.

      It uses the ePapirus icon theme, which is just Papirus with better support for Elementary's UI. GTK theme is (if I remember correctly) Qogir and the Plank theme is the GTK one. What do yours look like?

      24 votes
    3. I've been thinking about this but based on the current rulings in the Oracle v. Google court case, it would seem that APIs are indeed copyrightable. This would mean that Wine would be infringing...

      I've been thinking about this but based on the current rulings in the Oracle v. Google court case, it would seem that APIs are indeed copyrightable.

      This would mean that Wine would be infringing on Microsoft's copyright of the Windows API and system calls. Of course it wouldn't matter until Microsoft actually does something about it. But as Wine gets better and better and its market share higher and higher, I worry that Microsoft might set their sights on Wine now that they have the law on their side.

      14 votes
    4. Hi guys, I'm really stumped and looking for a nudge in the right direction for how to utilise the ghoneycutt/pam module in puppet. Relatively new to this but got what I'd like to think as most the...

      Hi guys,

      I'm really stumped and looking for a nudge in the right direction for how to utilise the ghoneycutt/pam module in puppet. Relatively new to this but got what I'd like to think as most the basics down.

      I've configured a few things using modules such as NTP, SSSD and NSSWITCH but I'm just stuck on how I can use this module and pull info from Hiera into it.

      So, lets start with

      .yaml file:

      
              ### nsswitch.conf authentication configuration
      
              nsswitch::passwd:     'files sss'
      
              nsswitch::shadow:     'files sss'
      
      
      

      And then looking at the nsswitch.pp file:

      
              ### nsswitch.config setup
      
              class profile::linux::base::nsswitch {
      
              # Get heira values
      
                class { 'nsswitch':
      
                  passwd    => [lookup('nsswitch::passwd')],
      
                  shadow    => [lookup('nsswitch::shadow')],
      
      
      

      Simple enough to call the values I want and works how I want, now I'm trying to do the same type of thing for PAM using the ghoneycutt/pam module and there doesn't seem to be much info on how to use it, or it's just not sinking in for me.

      Some of my PAM Heira values:

              pam::pam_auth_lines:
                - '# Managed by Hiera key pam::pam_auth_lines'
                - 'auth        required      pam_env.so'
                - 'auth        sufficient    pam_fprintd.so'
                - 'auth        sufficient    pam_unix.so nullok try_first_pass'
                - 'auth        requisite     pam_succeed_if.so uid >= 500 quiet'
                - 'auth        sufficient    pam_sss.so use_first_pass'
                - 'auth        required      pam_deny.so'
              pam::pam_account_lines:
                - '# Managed by Hiera key pam::pam_account_lines'
                - 'account     required      pam_unix.so'
                - 'account     sufficient    pam_localuser.so'
                - 'account     sufficient    pam_succeed_if.so uid < 500 quiet'
                - 'account     [default=bad success=ok user_unknown=ignore] pam_sss.so'
                - 'account     required      pam_permit.so'
              pam::pam_password_lines:
                - '# Managed by Hiera key pam::pam_password_lines'
                - 'password    requisite     pam_cracklib.so try_first_pass retry=3 type='
                - 'password    sufficient    pam_unix.so sha512 shadow nullok try_first_pass use_authtok'
                - 'password    sufficient    pam_sss.so use_authtok'
                - 'password    required      pam_deny.so'
      

      Some things I've tried:

      1:

              class profile::linux::base::pam {
                # resources
                class { 'pam':
                  password-auth-ac  => [
                    lookup('pam::pam_auth_lines')],
                    lookup('pam::pam_account_lines')],
                    lookup('pam::pam_password_lines')],
                    lookup('pam::pam_session_lines')],
                 }
      
      

      2:

      
      	
      	      passwd  => [
      	
      	      lookup('pam::pam_auth_lines'),
      	
      	      lookup('pam::pam_account_lines'),
      	
      	      lookup('pam::pam_password_lines'),
      	
      	      lookup('pam::pam_session_lines'),
      	
      	      ],
      	
      	  }
      
      
              include ::pam
      
      	class profile::linux::base::pam {
      	
      	  # resources
      	
      	    include ::pam
      
      	         lookup('pam::pam_auth_lines')
      	
      	}
      
      
      

      I've tried a few other ways and can't get it to work as I want it to. Can anyone help?

      Thanks

      4 votes
    5. The Meta-application layer works by using a number of pre-configured free-to-use web applications such as FB messenger, gmail, skype, gchat, yahoo email, etc to establish a connection and transmit...

      The Meta-application layer works by using a number of pre-configured free-to-use web applications such as FB messenger, gmail, skype, gchat, yahoo email, etc to establish a connection and transmit data over top the application layer.

      It's purpose is to establish a meta-layer for new applications to make use of, to decrease centralization, and to increase privacy. Take the power back from big corporations, and put it back in with the People! (or some such thing, maybe...).

      So each end of the communication would check some pre-configured number of free-online web apps for a code/key from the other side. Once found that key would determine the ordering, frequency, and mediums to use for communication. Such as: gmail - first message, skype - second message, yahoo email - third and forth message, repeat 10x, then reverse order, repeat 10x, and then start over again or better yet some hard-to-discern pattern.

      Privacy would be increased through both obscurity (typically not a good way to do security) and through the use of a multitude of different web applications, each with their own varying degrees of security.

      The actual messages would be the binary code...or for a more directed-application - text messages... Communication would be slow....but possible?

      Anyways, that thought popped into my head so I thought I'd share it in case it took your own brain to any interesting places :)

      4 votes
    6. My pick is Perl5. Even though a lot people (mostly those who’ve never touched Perl) say it’s a “write only” language, I think it does a lot right. It’s easy to prototype with, and it gives you a...

      My pick is Perl5. Even though a lot people (mostly those who’ve never touched Perl) say it’s a “write only” language, I think it does a lot right. It’s easy to prototype with, and it gives you a lot of freedom in how you want to solve a problem; which I think is one of the most important features of a programming language.

      I’d like to know what your picks are!

      32 votes
    7. One of the people in an IRC channel I frequent pointed out a site I've been building uses CDNs that are IPv4 only. I never realized this, I just assumed every major provider had deployed IPv6. Oh,...

      One of the people in an IRC channel I frequent pointed out a site I've been building uses CDNs that are IPv4 only. I never realized this, I just assumed every major provider had deployed IPv6. Oh, how very wrong I was. A quick check of some major (to me) sites shows a shocking lack of IPv6, including:

      • Bootstrap (stackpath.bootstrapcdn.com)
      • Discord
      • FontAwesome (use.fontawesome.com)
      • GitHub/GitHub pages
      • GitLab/GitLab pages (self-hosted supports IPv6, but officially hosted GitLab only supports IPv4 due to Azure limitations)
      • jQuery, IF you use code.jquery.com (some tutorials use ajax.googleapis.com, which does have IPv6, but an unfortunate amount use code.jquery.com, including the getting started page for Bootstrap)
      • Parts of Amazon/AWS (Amazon is IPv4 only, some of AWS is IPv4 only, including S3)
      • Reddit
      • Stack Overflow/Exchange/etc
      • Twitter

      An honorable mention goes to Angular's websites because the websites themselves are IPv4 only but the libraries are hosted on ajax.googleapis.com, which is IPv6 accessible. I checked npm, PyPI, RubyGems, and Tildes, and they all support IPv6.

      I can understand why companies like Amazon have partial support (upgrading can be a PITA if you're a cloud service provider with uptime requirements), but then you have services like Discord (launched in 2015 with no obligation to maintain service) that only support IPv4. At the very least, I'd expect CDNs referenced by thousands (if not millions) of webpages to be on IPv6 by now.

      Am I missing something? CDNs are pretty static, it's just a matter of choosing one that supports IPv6, you don't even need to update your application if you just change the DNS entries.

      13 votes
    8. I just received a mail from my own e-mail address, hosted on Gandi on my own domain name. It said that the sender has hacked me, used malware, keyloggers and RDP to get my passwords and copy all...

      I just received a mail from my own e-mail address, hosted on Gandi on my own domain name. It said that the sender has hacked me, used malware, keyloggers and RDP to get my passwords and copy all my files to his own computer, and took videos of me while watching adult content using my webcam (I never noticed the light turning on for it). Claims they've been doing this for a few months. Gives a bitcoin address and wants $1000 (a sum I can't and won't give, don't even have a fraction of it) in 48 hrs, or else will share the videos with my contacts. It said something about a pixel the message included.

      I viewed the message from K-9 mail on android (which didn't tell anything about pixels or whatnot), and when I went back on my computer to check the headers and stuff, the message was deleted.

      Now, is this some sort of phishing or or have I really been pwned? I feel like it's just phishing, but the message deleting itself kinda gave me shills of fear. I promptly changed my password for the mail account.

      10 votes
    9. There seems to be a trend lately of people switching over to BSD operating systems. Having read some blog posts on the matter and now given the recent system-d controversy, I'm genuinely curious...

      There seems to be a trend lately of people switching over to BSD operating systems. Having read some blog posts on the matter and now given the recent system-d controversy, I'm genuinely curious to give FreeBSD or OpenBSD a go as my main OS.

      For those who have switched over to BSD, what are some problems you've encountered and/or what are some things you miss?

      33 votes
    10. Today I configured an onion service and it was like 10 minutes job, very easy and I now have my hidden service up and running. Have you configured an onion service, if so then for what? Simple...

      Today I configured an onion service and it was like 10 minutes job, very easy and I now have my hidden service up and running. Have you configured an onion service, if so then for what?

      Simple Steps

      • Install nginx (or any other web server), tor

      • Configure nginx

      • Add few lines in torrc

      • Done!

      9 votes
    11. As an undergrad computer science student, I'll be starting my career soon. I want to make it enjoyable, productive, avoid too many mistakes and generally try to succeed. If you want to share...

      As an undergrad computer science student, I'll be starting my career soon. I want to make it enjoyable, productive, avoid too many mistakes and generally try to succeed.

      If you want to share anything that could be beneficial to succeeding in various tech fields, either books, advice or really anything else - I'd like to hear it.

      Books
      Are there any books that you can recommend, which helped you in your career. From hard technical skills, to soft interpersonal skills required to succeed in software engineering, systems engineering, or similar fields. Books oriented towards problem solving, algorithms, good engineering practices, etc.

      A book I found recommended quite a lot, but didn't get around to reading just yet is Designing Data-Intensive Applications.

      Blogs or any other sources are welcome as well.

      A bit of background

      I'm currently an undergrad computer science student, but I started programming around 8 years ago and finished a few projects on my own. I've been working at a small software company for the past 2 years, but I don't really feel like I'm improving as much as I could - mostly due to constrained budgets and short deadlines, which don't allow me to grow. I want to read and improve my skills on my own time as well.

      I'm not sure if this topic has been discussed before - I'm new to Tildes and haven't figured out how to filter results to only display topics in ~comp.

      20 votes
    12. Let's talk browsers

      I've tried a lot of browsers. Starting from Chrome, to Chromium, to Firefox, to Links, to w3m, to, eventually, Qutebrowser, which I use for most of my browsing now. At least for me, I had four...

      I've tried a lot of browsers. Starting from Chrome, to Chromium, to Firefox, to Links, to w3m, to, eventually, Qutebrowser, which I use for most of my browsing now.

      At least for me, I had four things in mind while choosing a browser:

      • I want it to be light
      • I want it to be minimal
      • I want it to be keyboard-oriented
      • I want it to be able to use modern websites

      I won't be going through all the browsers I've tried, but those I mentioned are the big ones, so I'll just do a quick check-list of these things.

      Chrome/Chromium:

      • Weighs like a sumo wrestler 1/5
      • Cluttered 1/5
      • Just some shortcuts and extentions 3/5
      • The model, the idol to strife for 5/5

      Firefox:

      • Apparently lighter than Chromium, though not by much 1/5
      • Cluttered 1/5
      • Some shortcuts, famous extensions 3/5
      • On point 5/5

      Links:

      • Very light and fast 5/5
      • Minimal, though can go smaller 4/5
      • Yes 5/5
      • Doesn't support javascript 1/5

      w3m:

      • As light as it gets 6/5
      • Pretty damn minimal 5/5
      • Even works for blind 5/5
      • Does javascript, but hard to use with cluttered wesites like Reddit or any news site 3/5

      Qutebrowser:

      • It is quite small and feels fast 4/5
      • Can be easily modified to not have anything on screen, and command line-like controls 5/5
      • Great, but hint system fails with javascript 4/5
      • Doesn't work with Reddit, for some reason 4/5

      With the things that I look for, Qutebrowser is the answer, with w3m being the close second. Of course, there are different things to look for in a piece of software, and you may want the extra stability and extensions Firefox provides, or privacy of Tor browser, or the suckless nature of surf, so I'd like to hear what is your browser of choice!

      18 votes
    13. I don't know what is the correct word in English, but I'll be one of those guys who will teach a "class" consisting on answering questions and guiding them through the exercises. The content is...

      I don't know what is the correct word in English, but I'll be one of those guys who will teach a "class" consisting on answering questions and guiding them through the exercises.

      The content is very basic algorithms in C, so things like functions, pointers, and structs are off the scope. Here is the repo I made with the solutions for last semester. I'm starting in the second semester, so I have everything fresh in my memory.

      I welcome anything you can give but I'm not necessarily seeking technical advice since the teachers have that covered. What I'd really like to know is what you consider to be some good examples, attitudes, and approaches for this particular position. Thanks.

      7 votes