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  • Showing only topics with the tag "linux". Back to normal view
    1. Does anybody have any experience with switching to pipewire?

      I'm considering making the switch to pipewire, as my current setup involving a bridge between JACK and PulseAudio is growing frustrating. Even on a fresh boot, Spotify won't play until Pulse has...

      I'm considering making the switch to pipewire, as my current setup involving a bridge between JACK and PulseAudio is growing frustrating. Even on a fresh boot, Spotify won't play until Pulse has been killed and restarted, and the same goes for games through Steam. All the while, Firefox audio works perfectly without doing so, and I can jump straight into recording with reaper without any issues from the get-go.

      I've been reading through the Arch wiki to get a feel for what the process should be like, and it seems like it'll be relatively straightforward, but given that I do a lot of music recording on my computer, I don't want to experience a total breakage of my sound setup. I'm planning to make a full backup of my system before making any changes, so I can roll it back if need be, but if anybody has any experience with switching to pipewire on a production system, I'd be grateful to hear about any pitfalls or problems that you ran into which I should be aware of in advance!

      7 votes
    2. What are your favorite Linux distributions to use for gaming and as a daily driver, and why?

      I'm curious what experiences people who game on linux have had, what your favorite distros are, and why. Mind sharing them in this thread? I'm in the market. My old GTX770 just bit the dust. I...

      I'm curious what experiences people who game on linux have had, what your favorite distros are, and why. Mind sharing them in this thread? I'm in the market.

      My old GTX770 just bit the dust. I picked up a Radeon 6600 to replace it, only to discover after installing it that while the 6600XT has Windows 7 drivers, the 6600 itself does not. The desktop works, but that's it. A little strange, but not entirely unexpected.

      My ancient frankenstein Win 7 Enterprise has got to go (into a VM, already on its way) and there is simply no way in hell I will ever use any version of the spyware/bloatware mess that Windows has become today. They lost me forever the second they put a marketplace and ads into my start menu. Ain't nobody got time for that, or at least, I don't.

      That means it's finally Linux time, for real - no going back. I'm rather excited. :D

      Side note: My original install date for Windows 7 Enterprise was 11-12-2011, it's lasted nearly eleven years without a BSOD or the need to reinstall. They really did fix windows decay syndrome in v7. That's the longest I've ever had a desktop OS last. Can any desktop linux distro manage to go that long, I wonder?

      The last time I ran a linux daily driver was Ubuntu for two years around '08, until I got sick of the pulseaudio issues. I'm not worried about that anymore, linux is ready for primetime now. That begs the question of which distro to use. I've toyed with or supported just about all of them at work (mint, redhat, suse, ubuntu, arch, deb, slack just to name a few). I'm a sysadmin by trade so I'm not phased by the learning curve, I know linux cold already.

      It's more a question of which distro is going to bother me the least acting as my daily driver. I like to tinker at work, but if I have to do it all the time at home I get cranky. I prefer the 'it just works' experience. The primary requirement is linux gaming, as this is my main gaming rig. That means lots of Skyrim Special Edition, Stellaris, Rimworld, emulators, etc.

      There's so many choices out there I'm not sure how to tell which one is the best and I don't particularly feel like putting a dozen of them through their paces over a month to find out - so I'm asking Tildes. ;) I don't mind trying a couple. Steam is required. Good support for WINE is a bonus. Ditto virtual desktop support - is Compiz still a thing or is there something better?

      Here are the system specs. I'm sure it's all fully linux compatible.

      1. Asus Maximus IV Extreme-Z
      2. Intel i7 2600K (3.2GHz, OC'ed to 4.2GHz with a Noctua air cooler, never breaks 60'C)
      3. Sapphire RX6600 GPU w 8GB of DDR6
      4. 16GB of G.Skill DDR3 2400MHz memory
      5. 500GB Samsung SSD, 4x4TB WD Red NAS drives

      Yeah, it's long in the tooth, and I'm glad I went for the Z/K combo so the new GPU isn't entirely gimped plugged into a much older PCIe 2.0 mainboard. I'll pick up a Ryzen sometime to replace it, but not until after the chip shortage shakes out. It was hard enough getting that 6600 in this market without getting scalped.

      21 votes
    3. Whatever happened with UMN vs. Linux Kernel Maintainers?

      Even tech news moves a bit too fast for me to keep up. Did UMN ever get unbanned? I saw a half-hearted apology and then finally this [1], but never heard any update. Most recent article I've seen...

      Even tech news moves a bit too fast for me to keep up. Did UMN ever get unbanned? I saw a half-hearted apology and then finally this [1], but never heard any update. Most recent article I've seen is this ZDNet article [2] from a couple of weeks ago discussing a related issue, but still mentions that UMN is still banned.

      Anyone following this?

      [1] https://cse.umn.edu/cs/statement-computer-science-engineering-confirming-linux-technical-advisory-board-findings-may-9

      [2] https://www.zdnet.com/article/hard-work-and-poor-pay-stresses-out-open-source-maintainers/

      4 votes
    4. A few easy linux commands, and a real-world example on how to use them in a pinch

      This below is a summary of some real-world performance investigation I recently went through. The tools I used are installed on all linux systems, but I know some people don't know them and would...

      This below is a summary of some real-world performance investigation I recently went through. The tools I used are installed on all linux systems, but I know some people don't know them and would straight up jump to heavyweight log analysis services and what not, or writing their own solution.

      Let's say you have request log sampling in a bunch of log files that contain lines like these:

      127.0.0.1 [2021-05-27 23:28:34.460] "GET /static/images/flags/2/54@3x.webp HTTP/2" 200 1806 TLSv1.3 HIT-CLUSTER SessionID:(null) Cache:max-age=31536000
      127.0.0.1 [2021-05-27 23:51:22.019] "GET /pl/player/123456/changelog/ HTTP/1.1" 200 16524 TLSv1.2 MISS-CLUSTER SessionID:(null) Cache:

      You might recognize Fastly logs there (IP anonymized). Now, there's a lot you might care about in this log file, but in my case, I wanted to get a breakdown of hits vs misses by URL.

      So, first step, let's concatenate all the log files with cat *.log > all.txt, so we can work off a single file.

      Then, let's split the file in two: hits and misses. There are a few different values for them, the majority are covered by either HIT-CLUSTER or MISS-CLUSTER. We can do this by just grepping for them like so:

      grep HIT-CLUSTER all.txt > hits.txt; grep MISS-CLUSTER all.txt > misses.txt
      

      However, we only care about url and whether it's a hit or a miss. So let's clean up those hits and misses with cut. The way cut works, it takes a delimiter (-d) and cuts the input based on that; you then give it a range of "fields" (-f) that you want.

      In our case, if we cut based on spaces, we end up with for example: 127.0.0.1 [2021-05-27 23:28:34.460] "GET /static/images/flags/2/54@3x.webp HTTP/2" 200 1806 TLSv1.3 HIT-CLUSTER SessionID:(null) Cache:max-age=31536000.

      We care about the 5th value only. So let's do: cut -d" " -f5 to get that. We will also sort the result, because future operations will require us to work on a sorted list of values.

      cut -d" " -f5 hits.txt | sort > hits-sorted.txt; cut -d" " -f5 misses.txt | sort > misses-sorted.txt
      

      Now we can start doing some neat stuff. wc (wordcount) is an awesome utility, it lets you count characters, words or lines very easily. wc -l counts lines in an input, since we're operating with one value per line we can easily count our hits and misses already:

      $ wc -l hits-sorted.txt misses-sorted.txt
        132523 hits-sorted.txt
        220779 misses-sorted.txt
        353302 total
      

      220779 / 132523 is a 1:1.66 ratio of hits to misses. That's not great…

      Alright, now I'm also interested in how many unique URLs are hit versus missed. uniq tool deduplicates immediate sequences, so the input has to be sorted in order to deduplicate our entire file. We already did that. We can now count our urls with uniq < hits-sorted.txt | wc -l; uniq < misses-sorted.txt | wc -l. We get 49778 and 201178, respectively. It's to be expected that most of our cache misses would be in "rarer" urls; this gives us a 1:4 ratio of cached to uncached URL.

      Let's say we want to dig down further into which URLs are most often hitting the cache, specifically. We can add -c to uniq in order to get a duplicate count in front of our URLs. To get the top ones at the top, we can then use sort, in reverse sort mode (-r), and it also needs to be numeric sort, not alphabetic (-n). head lets us get the top 10.

      $ uniq -c < hits-sorted.txt | sort -nr | head
          815 /static/app/webfonts/fa-solid-900.woff2?d720146f1999
          793 /static/app/images/1.png
          786 /static/app/fonts/nunito-v9-latin-ext_latin-regular.woff2?d720146f1999
          760 /static/CACHE/js/output.cee5c4089626.js
          758 /static/images/crest/3/light/notfound.png
          757 /static/CACHE/css/output.4f2b59394c83.css
          756 /static/app/webfonts/fa-regular-400.woff2?d720146f1999
          754 /static/app/css/images/loading.gif?d720146f1999
          750 /static/app/css/images/prev.png?d720146f1999
          745 /static/app/css/images/next.png?d720146f1999
      

      And same for misses:

      $ uniq -c < misses-sorted.txt | sort -nr | head
           56 /
           14 /player/237678/
           13 /players/
           12 /teams/
           11 /players/top/
      <snip>
      

      So far this tells us static files are most often hit, and for misses it also tells us… something, but we can't quite track it down yet (and we won't, not in this post). We're not adjusting for how often the page is hit as a whole, this is still just high-level analysis.

      One last thing I want to show you! Let's take everything we learned and analyze those URLs by prefix instead. We can cut our URLs again by slash with cut -d"/". If we want the first prefix, we can do -f1-2, or -f1-3 for the first two prefixes. Let's look!

      cut -d'/' -f1-2 < hits-sorted.txt | uniq -c | sort -nr | head
       100189 /static
         5948 /es
         3069 /player
         2480 /fr
         2476 /es-mx
         2295 /pt-br
         2094 /tr
         1939 /it
         1692 /ru
         1626 /de
      
      cut -d'/' -f1-2 < misses-sorted.txt | uniq -c | sort -nr | head
        66132 /static
        18578 /es
        17448 /player
        17064 /tr
        11379 /fr
         9624 /pt-br
         8730 /es-mx
         7993 /ru
         7689 /zh-hant
         7441 /it
      

      This gives us hit-miss ratios by prefix. Neat, huh?

      13 votes
    5. Share your linux desktop/setup

      I've put quite a bit of work into my i3 set up recently and I'm curious if the people here are interested in that kind of thing. I'd be interested in looking through configs to get ideas, and...

      I've put quite a bit of work into my i3 set up recently and I'm curious if the people here are interested in that kind of thing.

      I'd be interested in looking through configs to get ideas, and sharing screenshots and such.

      Here is what my desktop looks like right now. Let me know what you think.

      26 votes
    6. What is the difference between Linux distros? Why do you use the one you use?

      I still mainly use Windows, although I've dual-booted Linux a few times and I have Linux Mint on an old laptop right now. One thing I've never understood about Linux is all the different...

      I still mainly use Windows, although I've dual-booted Linux a few times and I have Linux Mint on an old laptop right now. One thing I've never understood about Linux is all the different distributions - their different reputations and why they have them. What is the mechanical difference between using one distribution of Linux and another? Or are the differences usually not mechanical?

      For example, Ubuntu and Debian seem to be large families, meaning that a lot of other distributions are based on them (using packages built for them in their package managers at least) as well as being popular distros on their own. But what's different between the two of them, and between each and the other distros based on them? (and what's similar? I gather they all use the Linux kernel at least!)

      I also know that people are quite opinionated on their choice of distro, I wondered what reasons people had for their choice. What things are easier or harder for you in your distro of choice? Is it mainly day-to-day tasks that are important or more how the OS works underneath? How much difference does your preferred distro make?

      For myself, I've only used Kubuntu (though not much) and Linux Mint, which was mainly for UI reasons, and particularly for the latter, ease of use for someone used to Windows (at least that was what I found years ago when I first looked into it).

      Though I doubt I'll ever fully move away from Windows I would like / need to have access to a Linux OS, so maybe this will help me to know what is important to look for. But I also hope it'll be a useful and interesting discussion topic. Also, there are some previous discussions on the latter question so I'd be more interested in learning about the main topic.

      also, please do add more tags

      29 votes
    7. Anyone using a lightweight browser with Linux?

      I've got a crappy Chromebook running GalliumOS (Xubuntu) and Chromium is slow as molasses. I tried a few other browsers like Otter and Falkon. They're alright for most sites -- not Tildes, but...

      I've got a crappy Chromebook running GalliumOS (Xubuntu) and Chromium is slow as molasses. I tried a few other browsers like Otter and Falkon. They're alright for most sites -- not Tildes, but this seems consistent with QT5 browsers.

      Anyway, outside of text browsers, anybody have any light weight browser suggestions?

      14 votes
    8. Does reformatting an ext4 partition fix bad sectors, and what are they anyway?

      My Linux desktop is having a bit of difficulty with bad sectors. Lately I've had to boot into recovery and run an fsck a few times to try to fix a problem where the OS drops into read-only mode at...

      My Linux desktop is having a bit of difficulty with bad sectors. Lately I've had to boot into recovery and run an fsck a few times to try to fix a problem where the OS drops into read-only mode at the drop of a hat. Today I tried copying some files from one directory to another and got the following error message:
      cp: error reading "foo/bar": Input/output error

      I've just booted into a live USB and run fsck /dev/sda1 -c and it fixed a load of bad sectors, but the above error message is still happening.

      A bit of googling tells me that this is down to bad sectors on the SSD, and I'm not really sure what that means. Is anybody able to enlighten me? And as a follow-up question, would reformatting the hard drive resolve the problem, or are there any other things I can try to fix it?

      9 votes