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  • Showing only topics with the tag "linux". Back to normal view
    1. Linux is a subpar choice for professional video editing

      I don't wanna get into a heated discussion, so let me make something very clear: for a regular user, video editing on Linux is probably fine. That is just not my use case. I'm used to a degree of...

      I don't wanna get into a heated discussion, so let me make something very clear: for a regular user, video editing on Linux is probably fine.

      That is just not my use case.

      I'm used to a degree of freedom, choice, and stability that, right now, Linux does not provide in that area.

      I'm a film major who has worked as a professional video editor for many years and editing video on anything that is not nearly as good, reliable and precise as Adobe Premiere feels like torture.

      But even being very flexible regarding features and requirements, after trying all the regular suggestions, as professional tools, and with all the respect I can muster, they are just unusable for me.

      I need a reliable program in which I can throw any format without worrying about constant crashes, but Linux options are all either extremely limited, unstable or both! Before anyone asks: I tried multiple programs, in different versions and installation methods, on entirely different hardware and unaffiliated distributions.

      Kdenlive resembles professional-grade software but constantly crashes at the simplest operations. DaVinci Resolve seems like a good bet but is a nightmare just to install and equally crashy when/if I'm able to do so (last time I had to manually edit the install script following the instructions of some random forum post. This did not cause a good impression. And audio didn't work), and I'm not willing to use something so finicky if Linux doesn't get primary support.

      Besides, Blackmagic Design only provides a few pieces of the puzzle. Professional video editing requires a whole stack of integrated software. Both Windows and Mac OS have this, Linux has not.

      There's also the issue of GPU acceleration.

      I'm not saying FOSS developers owe me anything, nor that they have done a bad job with programs like OpenShot, Pitivi, Blender, whatever. I'm just saying that, regrettably, I'll probably have to install put Windows on dual-boot on my machine in the next few days.

      14 votes
    2. How to install Firefox Nightly on NixOS

      I had a bit of free time tonight and decided to write a short blog post detailing my solution for installing Firefox Nightly on NixOS, since this was the only solution I came across that actually...

      I had a bit of free time tonight and decided to write a short blog post detailing my solution for installing Firefox Nightly on NixOS, since this was the only solution I came across that actually worked and was not ridiculously complicated.

      I wrote this in about an hour and I was (and am) quite tired, so please forgive (but still point out) any mistakes or possible improvements. Hopefully my solution ends up being useful for you.

      Finally, to spare everyone from having to look at my "blog", here is the text of the post copied onto Tildes:


      Like some other Linux distributions, NixOS supports the use of overlays.

      I am actually not very familiar with how overlays work on NixOS. So, for the sake of simplicity, we will just think of them as being similar to PPAs on Ubuntu. Except, instead of being a custom repository of downloadable packages, NixOS overlays are more like scripts that instruct the package manager on how to download and build additional packages (or just about anything, really).

      You might be wondering why you cannot just download the official Firefox Nightly release straight from Mozilla, extract it, and use that.

      Indeed, that is how I have always installed Firefox Nightly on other Linux distributions (it even automatically updates itself!), but I was unable to get it working on NixOS, hence the overlay. (You might have better luck though.)

      Thankfully for us, the overlay we are going to use is actually maintained by Mozilla:

      Located in this repository is a firefox-overlay.nix file, which is what we will use to fetch our Firefox Nightly binary. Go ahead and clone this repository onto your computer.

      Once you have cloned the repository, you will need to make a couple of edits to your configuration.nix file in /etc/nixos/.

      First, you will need to add the line nixpkgs.config.allowUnfree = true; if you want to use the binary Firefox packages and avoid having to compile them yourself (which I do not recommend doing, unless you have beefy hardware and a lot of free time).

      (The binary packages are considered "unfree" because of the Firefox trademark.)

      Second, you will need to add another line to your configuration.nix file that declares the firefox-overlay.nix file, from the repository you cloned, as an overlay. That can be accomplished with this line:

      nixpkgs.overlays = [ (import /path/to/firefox-overlay.nix) ];

      Finally, assuming you have done everything correctly, the last thing you will need to do is add a line declaring a Firefox package to install. Since this blog post is about installing Firefox Nightly, we'll add this line to our systemPackages list, alongside the rest of our system packages:

      latest.firefox-nightly-bin

      In the end, your configuration.nix file should end up with three new lines:


        nixpkgs.overlays = [ (import /etc/nixos/firefox-overlay.nix) ];
        nixpkgs.config.allowUnfree = true;
        environment.systemPackages = with pkgs; [
      	  latest.firefox-nightly-bin
        ];
      

      (I symlink my firefox-overlay.nix file to /etc/nixos/, but you can put it just about wherever you want. )

      And that should be it! Just run a nixos-rebuild command to bring your system in-sync with your configuration.nix file and Firefox Nightly should then be installed and usable.


      Shout out to the anonymous, deleted GitHub user who posted a comment on one of the overlay repository's issues. This was a very simple, very elegant solution. Unfortunately, it took me a long time to find this solution and I ran into quite a few people who were doing the same thing, but with vastly more complex configurations.

      9 votes
    3. Terry A Davis: Questions to God

      Hey everyone, just watching a very interesting history of Terry A Davis (creator of TempleOS) and around the 30 minute mark there is a list of questions Terry asked to God and the answers he...

      Hey everyone, just watching a very interesting history of Terry A Davis (creator of TempleOS) and around the 30 minute mark there is a list of questions Terry asked to God and the answers he believed he received. I took a look online but was unable to find anything. I don't suppose anyone out there has a link? I'd be very interested to read it. Thanks in advance.

      EDIT: I'm also interested in any links to the art he created (hymns, visual art etc).

      10 votes
    4. Tech support request: recovering from hard crashes in Linux

      EDIT: Latest update This is something so rudimentary that I'm a little embarrassed to ask, but I've also tried looking around online to no avail. One of the hard parts about being a Linux newbie...

      EDIT: Latest update


      This is something so rudimentary that I'm a little embarrassed to ask, but I've also tried looking around online to no avail. One of the hard parts about being a Linux newbie is that the amount of support material out there seems to differ based on distro, DE, and also time, so posts from even a year or two ago can be outdated or inapplicable.

      Here's my situation: I'm a newbie Linux user running Pop!_OS 19.10 with the GNOME desktop environment. Occasionally, games I'm playing will hard crash and lock up my system completely, leaving a still image of the game frozen on the screen indefinitely. The system stays there, completely unresponsive to seemingly any inputs. It doesn't happen often, but when it does it's almost always when I'm running a Windows game through Steam's Proton layer. I suspect it also might have something to do with graphics drivers, as I'll at times notice an uptick in frequency after certain updates, though that might just be me finding a suspicious pattern where none exists.

      Anyway, what I don't know how to do is gracefully exit or recover from these crashes. No keyboard shortcut seems to work, and I end up having to hold the power button on my computer until it abruptly shuts off. This seems to be the "worse case scenario" for handling it, so if there is a better way I should go about this, I'd love to know about it.


      EDIT: I really want to thank everyone for their help so far. My initial question has been answered, and for posterity's sake I'd like to post the solution here, to anyone who is searching around for this same issue and ends up in this thread:

      • Use CTRL+ALT+F3/F4/F5/F6 keys to access a terminal, where you can try to kill any offending processes and reboot if needed.
      • If that fails, use ALT+SYSRQ+R-E-I-S-U-B.

      With that out of the way, I've added more information about the crashes specifically to the thread, primarily here, and some people are helping me out with diagnosing the issue. This thread is now less about the proper way to deal with the crash than it is about trying to identify the cause of the crash and prevent it in the first place.

      12 votes
    5. Laptop review of Acer A315-42

      So I bought this laptop mainly for web browsing, document editing, note taking and programming with perhaps light gaming although that's not something I've tried yet. So, really just for school...

      So I bought this laptop mainly for web browsing, document editing, note taking and programming with perhaps light gaming although that's not something I've tried yet. So, really just for school work.

      Specifications

      Laptop Model : Acer Aspire 3 A315-42
      Laptop screen : 1080p IPS (with matte finish?)
      CPU : R5 3500U
      RAM : 8GB DDR4 (6GB available because of iGPU)
      Storage : 256GB SSD NVMe
      Wireless : Qualcomm Atheros QCA9377
      Wired : Realtek Semiconductor Co., Ltd. RTL8111/8168/8411 (According to lspci)
      2x USB 2.0, 1x USB 3.0, 1x HDMI port, Audio jack, 1x RJ45 Ethernet port
      Battery : 36.7Wh

      Linux compatibility

      Everything worked out of the box, gotta modify TLP to not kill the touchpad and webcam. The touchpad seems to have a mind of its own when it comes to being detected, It seems to be a kernel bug, unsure what I'll do about it concretely but rebooting a couple of times makes it work. Nothing to install thanks to AMD's open source mesa drivers. Might need a kernel higher than 5.3 because of general Ryzen 3000 issues but I've not tried, it was already higher than that.

      Operating system tested

      Basically never touched Windows, directly installed Fedora 31 Silverblue.

      My Silverblue configuration is :

      ● ostree://fedora:fedora/31/x86_64/silverblue
                         Version: 31.20191213.0 (2019-12-13T00:42:11Z)
                      BaseCommit: a5829371191d0a3e26d3cced9f075525d2ea73679bd255865fcf320bd2dca22a
                    GPGSignature: Valid signature by 7D22D5867F2A4236474BF7B850CB390B3C3359C4
             RemovedBasePackages: gnome-terminal-nautilus gnome-terminal 3.34.2-1.fc31
                 LayeredPackages: camorama cheese eog fedora-workstation-repositories gedit gnome-calendar gnome-font-viewer gnome-tweaks hw-probe libratbag-ratbagd lm_sensors nano neofetch
                                  powertop radeontop sysprof systemd-swap tilix tlp
      

      Kernel : 5.3.15
      Gnome : 3.34.1

      Body and Looks

      The screen back has metal, I believe it feels quite sturdy. The rest is reasonable feeling plastic. The material used just loves to imprint grease / fingers which kinda sucks - the keys being the exception thankfully. There was also stickers on the inside which well, are somewhat standard but I thought they were pretty obnoxious so I removed them.

      Typing experience

      It's nothing amazing but it's good enough. I'm not really knowledgeable on keyboards so that's as much as I can say on it, really.

      Performance

      Everything feels quite snappy but I don't game at all on this machine so I'm not pushing it too much other than while I'm compiling or doing other things. The temperature does go up to 75°C and the fans get a little loud but it's not that bad. It's mostly the bottom getting hot so it's not something you notice too much while typing. It also cold boots quite fast, in about 10-20seconds I want to say but I've not benchmarked that. It's my first computer with an SSD so there's that.

      Battery life

      I get about 5hours with tlp installed doing web browsing, some programming occasionally, listening to music on the speakers and chatting. Personally I was kind of expecting more from this considering it's an APU but it seems to be what other people are getting on similar setups so It'll do.

      Conclusion

      Overall, I'm pretty happy with this laptop considering how I bought it for 575$ on sale. I made this review mostly because I wasn't finding much information about this laptop on Linux and well, I don't know, I guess I felt like it. If you have any questions, ask up!

      11 votes
    6. The PinePhone ($150 Linux smartphone) is now available for pre-order

      Some more info about the PinePhone Pre-order page on the Pine Store The early adopter edition of the PinePhone is now available for pre-order. This batch is 3000 units, from what I know ~1000 are...

      Some more info about the PinePhone

      Pre-order page on the Pine Store

      The early adopter edition of the PinePhone is now available for pre-order. This batch is 3000 units, from what I know ~1000 are already sold. These units are currently being produced, and are planned to ship in December/January. Mass production of the consumer edition of the phone is planned to begin in March 2020.

      I just pre-ordered mine, is anyone else getting one? Any thoughts on the state of Linux smartphones, whether it's the PinePhone, Librem 5, or something else?

      27 votes
    7. I want to learn programming. What language should i pick to write cli apps for linux?

      I'm interested in C or Go, but i'm open to ideas. I have plenty of sh scripts i created to integrate my tools and system, so i have some experience and i don't want a scripting language like...

      I'm interested in C or Go, but i'm open to ideas.

      I have plenty of sh scripts i created to integrate my tools and system, so i have some experience and i don't want a scripting language like python.

      My first plan is to learn the basics of the language and rewrite some of those scripts.

      I think my first pick will be a script that uses ffmpeg to convert my flac files to mp3 or opus. I use sndconv -opus/-mp3 and it checks if there are flac files in the folder (i only have full albums), converts and puts in a folder named "$artist - $album".

      My long term goal is to make a cli/tui music player like cmus.

      UPDATE: i'm having plenty of success with Go right now. I just wrote a basic version of my music conversion script. It's just converting a music i pass as argument to mp3, but i'll keep working on it and adding functionality just to dip my toes in Go. It seems like a good language and i'm having fun!

      Thanks for all the answers!

      18 votes
    8. How can I make "whereis" automatically open the file on Nvim when it is the only result?

      EDIT: SOLVED It looks like it was much simple than I thought and someone solved it on Reddit already. I won't delete, just leave the link if someone is interested. Runtime Environment OS: MX Linux...

      EDIT: SOLVED

      It looks like it was much simple than I thought and someone solved it on Reddit already. I won't delete, just leave the link if someone is interested.

      Runtime Environment

      Issue

      Sometimes I use "whereis" (aliased for "wh", but it doesn't make any difference...) for my own scripts.

      I usually copy their paths manually (using tmux) and paste to the command line resulting in something like this:

      nvim /home/my_username/my_scripts_folder/my_script
      

      Could I make that into a single command?

      Thanks in advance!

      3 votes
    9. Please tell me what you think about this idea for a text editor/Linux Distribution combo

      I know there are similar products I could buy in the US that would give me this experience, but I'm not in the US and I don't have much money. In the old days, my father had some kind of machine...

      I know there are similar products I could buy in the US that would give me this experience, but I'm not in the US and I don't have much money.

      In the old days, my father had some kind of machine that was not a proper laptop and not a proper typewriter. It opened instantly to a text editor. As far as I remember, there was no noticeable boot time. It had a keyboard and an entry for a floppy disk. You typed your stuff, saved it to the floppy disk, probably to send via email or to print in another machine. I loved that machine.

      I love these little gadgets that do one thing and one thing only. And, as someone with severe ADHD, they're often a necessity. If my Kindle had Youtube I would never read a book. If my PS4 had Emacs I would never play a game. The list goes on, but the principle is this: a lot of things are useful to me precisely because of what they cannot do.

      And that is why I wanna recreate my father's crazy computer-typewriter.

      Because I know how to use the command line, it really needs to be in total lockdown: I open it up, it shows a very simple text editor (with a few handy features that make it works even more like a typewriter) that I cannot configure, tinker or alter in any way. It's focused on writing (not editing) literature because that's what I need and other kinds of writing require an internet connection.

      It would save and back up automatically (like a typewriter) to one or more drives at your choice.

      There would need to be a few options because of different screen sizes, the number of screens etc, with an interface to make it easier.

      So the idea is an ultra-minimal, kiosk-mode Linux distribution that can either go on a flash drive or be installed on an old laptop. No package management, no internet connection, no access to the command line, no configuration files, no distractions whatsoever. I wanna forget I'm even using Linux. I wanna recreate my father's typewriter/computer that he never let me touch.

      How do I do this?

      14 votes