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    1. Deciding between Godot and Unity

      Hey, all. I'm back four weeks to the day after you guys gave me a lot of great advice about potentially making a 2D RPG out of my tabletop RPG. I decided to try both Godot and Unity given what...

      Hey, all. I'm back four weeks to the day after you guys gave me a lot of great advice about potentially making a 2D RPG out of my tabletop RPG. I decided to try both Godot and Unity given what people told me and I completed two tutorials for each over the last few weeks. After completing these two tutorials, I have some questions that I hope maybe some of you can answer to help me choose between the two.

      TL;DR at the bottom. This is a long post.

      For context, here's the tutorials I did:

      Godot - https://www.davidepesce.com/godot-tutorials/
      Unity - https://learn.unity.com/project/ruby-s-2d-rpg

      To be frank, the Unity tutorial wasn't really an RPG. There were no stats, no quests, XP. It was much more of an adventure game. That's fine, it still gave me a lot of time inside the engine to learn a lot of basics.

      So, working with each one had it's own up and downs.

      Unity's use of an external scripting program seemed to hurt me quite a bit, from simple things such as forgetting to save before going back to Unity (I did this way too much) to having to declare public variables in the script and then filling them in the Unity GUI rather than just doing it all by script. The editor itself also seems to be kind of heavy, I was get the spiral beach ball for a second or two every time I went between the script editor and Unity and I have a machine that can edit 8K video without proxies. These general load times and stuff like that seemed to come up regularly. Tilemapping in the tutorial didn't include autotiling, I assume Unity has this somewhere built in? Or do you need to purchase an asset to get this functionality?

      On the plus side, Unity overall seemed easier to use for a non-programmer. A lot of things are done through the GUI. Animations seem easier to handle for sure. The Unity tutorial was also more written for someone that hasn't coded much as it explained what specifically the code was doing (so I assume more resources for Unity will be helpful in that way that perhaps Godot will not).

      For Godot, GScript was easier to use than C#, but I do feel like it was easier to get my head around prefabs in Unity than the Node system in Godot. The Godot tutorial took almost twice as long as the Unity one, but I don't know if that's because Godot is more difficult or the combination of the Godot tutorial being more thorough (I feel like I mad an actual, if very uncomplicated game, plus I did Godot first, which probably helped me just learn more about scripting and thinking like a programmer that I took into Unity). The node/scene system seemed more difficult to get my head around than game objects and prefabs. That said, my Godot program felt very tight. There weren't things happening that I was having a tough time explaining or figuring out why they weren't working quite right, at least at the graphical level (this might have more to do with the Godot tutorial using 8-bit graphics and Unity using a more modern sprite look). Having the scripts in the editor meant I never ran into a case like in Unity where I couldn't attach code to a game object because it was failing to compile, but it was failing to compile because it wasn't attached to a game object (that headache took at least a half an hour to sort out).

      Overall, I was able to finish both tutorials mostly understanding what the code I was given was doing and was able to edit it to get some different affects and kind of just play around. So, on that level, I'd say they're about equal.

      One big thing I want for sure out of the engine we use is to be able to handle a lot of conversations and variables there from. We're hoping to make a "choices matter" (TM) game, and very story/dialog heavy. Ink seems like a good plug-in to do this in Unity, but implementation doesn't seem easy (though I did find a pretty good looking tutorial that may help de-mystify). Godot seems to have some assets available for handling dialog trees, but i haven't had a chance to really dig in to them yet. So, that could definitely be a decider for me: which engine has assets that make a dialog/choice heavy game easier to make.

      While I had originally thought about making a tactics RPG for this project, looking around at both the Godot and Unity scenes, it seems like few people are making these types of projects that are giving out free advice on how to make them work in those engines. After talking with my team (I have a team!, see my post from a while back), it seemed like a good idea both to keep the game within the scope of a novice, but still tell the story we wanted, to do a skill role system instead. Since this came from a tabletop session anyway, seemed to make the most sense to do skill rolls rather than develop a whole combat system.

      TL;DR - Looking for advice on which engine, between Godot and Unity, would be handle a 2D RPG that relies on a lot of dialog and choices along with skill rolls for the gameplay. Thanks in advance!

      9 votes
    2. What are your thoughts on the next gen consoles from Xbox and Playstation?

      We are almost in a new generation of consoles and was just wondering what everyone's thoughts are on each offering. Some questions to prompt (but feel free to just share what's at the top of your...

      We are almost in a new generation of consoles and was just wondering what everyone's thoughts are on each offering. Some questions to prompt (but feel free to just share what's at the top of your mind):

      Have you preordered a system?

      Which system do you think looks best to you and why?

      How will these systems impact gaming on PC?

      Would you get the digital or disc version?

      Will these consoles affect Nintendo's plans?

      Has Microsoft re-claimed any of their lost momentum from the Xbox One launch?

      What features are most important to you?

      If you aren't planning on buying at launch, is there something you are waiting for?

      15 votes
    3. I've beaten Final Fantasy VII Remake. How to approach the Postgame and Hard mode?

      Warning: this post may contain spoilers

      I beat Final Fantasy VII Remake last week. Those last chapters were exhausting, and amazing, and now that I've gotten some rest I'm thinking about going back and doing some postgame content and Hard mode.

      Any tips on where to begin? I tried picking Chapter 9 to go to the Colosseum and get a couple upgrades I missed for Aerith, but quickly died to some easy mobs within the first 15 minutes of the chapter.

      So I'm thinking I need to do some grinding first, probably on Normal, before attempting Hard? My characters are around Level 40.

      How did you go about the postgame content? Did you replay the chapters in chronological order, or prioritize specific goals? What worked well for you (read: made the postgame enjoyable and not frustrating), and what would you have done differently?

      10 votes
    4. What are the oldest games you still regularly play?

      For the purposes of the question, I want to ignore official remasters/rereleases since those are essentially separate, newer full releases. I'm interested in old, original games. Titles that you...

      For the purposes of the question, I want to ignore official remasters/rereleases since those are essentially separate, newer full releases. I'm interested in old, original games. Titles that you can "manually remaster" yourself with mods are fine, since you're still playing the "original" game to some extent.

      Also, "regularly" in the title doesn't have to mean daily/weekly and can instead be "once every couple of years".

      • What keeps you coming back to them?
      • Is your love for the games strictly nostalgia-based, or could an unacquainted newcomer still find similar value in them?
      • If there are any modern games that try to scratch the same itch, do they succeed or fail?
      • Would you want an official remaster of the game (if one isn't already available)?
      25 votes
    5. Noclip Summer Jam: Celebrating Noclip's 4th birthday - A full week of Noclip videos

      Introducing Noclip Summer Jam - Celebrating Our 4th Birthday! Filming our Final Fantasy XIV Documentary in Japan (2017) Edmund McMillen Breaks Down His Game Design History (Meat Boy, Isaac & More)...
      1. Introducing Noclip Summer Jam - Celebrating Our 4th Birthday!
      2. Filming our Final Fantasy XIV Documentary in Japan (2017)
      3. Edmund McMillen Breaks Down His Game Design History (Meat Boy, Isaac & More)
      4. Unboxing Our Classic Amiga Game Collection with Danny & Alan O'Dwyer
      5. Before & After Don't Starve - The History of Klei Entertainment
      4 votes
    6. Ubisoft Forward - September 2020

      Ubisoft's event today just finished up. Here's the full video if you want to watch (there's a pre-show of an hour that I skipped past), but here are all the individual videos/trailers from the...

      Ubisoft's event today just finished up. Here's the full video if you want to watch (there's a pre-show of an hour that I skipped past), but here are all the individual videos/trailers from the event:

      Yeah, the titles are a mess, but I'm just using the video titles from YouTube.

      5 votes