Wes's recent activity

  1. Comment on Tony Blair wants us to stop worrying and embrace AI in ~tech

    Wes
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    I'm not a British citizen so I'm not as familiar with Blair as I probably should be, but his answers seem to show an understanding of the current technologies (eg. AlphaFold), potential...

    I'm not a British citizen so I'm not as familiar with Blair as I probably should be, but his answers seem to show an understanding of the current technologies (eg. AlphaFold), potential applications (eg. automating tedious governmental forms/tasks), as well as potential from the far future (AGI).

    I particularly find myself agreeing with the optimistic outlook in regards to medical applications and personalized school tutoring. The former is seeing a lot of fantastic work right now built on machine learning and the transformer architecture, while the latter is currently an area of research by Eureka Labs (recently founded by Andrej Karpathy) and Khan Academy.

    Interesting piece, and frankly a little surprising to see a politician of a bygone era so well informed on state of the art technology.

    3 votes
  2. Comment on Facebook and Instagram's algorithmic favoritism towards extremist parties revealed in new study of political ads in Germany in ~tech

    Wes
    Link Parent
    Oh I don't doubt it. Recommendation feeds all over have the problem of spreading misinformation, incendiary emotional content, and extremist content. It likely isn't intentional, but they're...

    Oh I don't doubt it. Recommendation feeds all over have the problem of spreading misinformation, incendiary emotional content, and extremist content. It likely isn't intentional, but they're designed to be engaging and this content is extremely engaging. Understanding the impacts of these algorithms is an important topic and necessary to reduce its harmful effects.

    To clarify though, the article and study linked seem more focused on understanding the inequality of ad spending across the political spectrum. I think it's easy to read that and assume "Oh Facebook wants to make it cheaper for <X group>", but really it's a dynamic system based on market forces. That's what I was hoping to explain in my comment.

    To give a more concrete example - and putting aside that the study is about Germany for a moment - an example of a high value demographic would be age 40+ women living in US battleground states. These are impactful voters with a lot of power, so there's more competition to get ads in front of their eyes.

    Meanwhile, youth (low turnout voters) from deep red or blue states are of less value. From an ad buyer's perspective, they have less money and less voting power. This makes their ad buys a lot cheaper, and this could benefit outreach for extremist or other political groups. It just depends on what their goals are. The article mentions that ads often reached younger audiences than intended, and that could be one reason why.

    It wouldn't surprise me at all if the targeted criteria used by some political groups results in higher costs, and this creates the inequality mentioned in the title. I don't really know what I'd suggest to fix the problem though. The study offers a few suggestions:

    For example, previous research (46) recommends that platforms make adaptations to the auction mechanisms to subsidize political advertisers or provide quotas in combination with separate auctions for political and commercial advertisers to lower competition for political advertisers. Policymakers could also require randomization of ad delivery among the target population as discussed by the European Parliament (47), thereby preventing discrimination due to algorithmic bias. Most importantly, policymakers should incentivize additional transparency measures. For example, current measures are insufficient to evaluate how the platform’s pricing mechanism influences ad delivery, limiting independent assessment by researchers.

    Just to be clear, there is still an underlying algorithm that groups users and calculates ad relevance, but it's different than the algorithm used for the content shared to these social networks. Transparency would help in both cases, though I don't think it's enough to defang them completely.

    6 votes
  3. Comment on Facebook and Instagram's algorithmic favoritism towards extremist parties revealed in new study of political ads in Germany in ~tech

    Wes
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    I'm surprised it was that low. Untargeted ads are usually a good way to waste your ad budget. The focus here seems to be on the social algorithm, but it seems to me the biggest consideration is...

    The study revealed that 72.3% of all political ads used targeting strategies, accounting for 72.6% of the total ad spending.

    I'm surprised it was that low. Untargeted ads are usually a good way to waste your ad budget.

    The focus here seems to be on the social algorithm, but it seems to me the biggest consideration is actually the auction system that ads use. Highly-contested keywords and demographics will cost much more, whereas your longtail ads will be far cheaper to run. Presumably then the extremists groups are just targeting lower-value keywords/users. Or am I misunderstanding? The study itself only briefly mentions this auction system, but I'm sure that it's the main factor in actually determining the cost of ad spends.

    4 votes
  4. Comment on A summer Covid-19 wave in ~health

    Wes
    Link Parent
    I don't feel we're on the precipice of war, but I do feel comments about killing the opposition do edge us closer to that point. Like @kfwyre, I've been feeling rather put off by some of the...

    I don't feel we're on the precipice of war, but I do feel comments about killing the opposition do edge us closer to that point. Like @kfwyre, I've been feeling rather put off by some of the political comments I'm seeing on Tildes recently. Particularly some who condoned the attempt on Donald Trump's life last week, or try to justify such political violence.

    I understand the frustration, and I agree that Republicans are often the prime contributors of this kind of rhetoric. However I also know that adding more fuel on the fire doesn't bring us closer to a peaceful resolution.

    Society can adapt to change surprisingly quickly. Right now it feels like the world is deftly moving away from democracy, but history shows us that positive change can happen just as quickly. Interracial marriage used to be a scandal, but is now commonplace. Smoking in public is no longer cool but seen as dirty. Popular support for gay rights has shifted dramatically in just a couple decades.

    People can change, even from deeply held beliefs. That change partly comes from generational shifts, but more than you'd think it comes from cultural pressures to improve. Adjusting the messaging on what's acceptable does work, even if its effects are not obvious at first. For that reason it's important that the messaging not be that the other side are devils or traitors, but that there are problems that affect all of us, and that we can work together to improve things.

    In many ways, those who frustrate us the most - be they anti-maskers, anti-vaccine, or political extremists - are also victims. They are the ones being lied to, having their world views contorted, and have to deal with the destruction of it all. Because in the same way that positive messaging influences us, so does the negative narrative. If we're constantly being told that our country is falling apart, that all of science is a sham, and that the outgroup is to blame, it's going to have an effect.

    From your comment it sounds like you're frustrated with your parents. I'm sure it hurts a lot to see them swept up in all this. As difficult as that is, I'd say it's worth remembering that they're likely feeling pain and frustration from all the doom and gloom they're being fed as well. And that they're also feeling the loss from any relationships ended over political fights.

    I know that it's hard to empathize with a political enemy, but I believe it is the most effective way to make connections and change minds. Talking to people works. Canvassing works. One of the biggest reasons that gay rights moved so quickly is that it turns out, many people already knew someone who was gay, even if they didn't know it yet. It was the brave folks that came out first that helped make it acceptable for everyone else. It might start as "they're one of the good ones", but bit-by-bit minds are changed. Optimistically, I think we're starting to see the same happen with support for transgender folks right now. Project 2025 is horrifying, but I don't believe it's stronger than people's propensity for growth.

    I'd like to suggest a few episodes from the podcast You Are Not So Smart which addresses this topic in greater detail.

    27 votes
  5. Comment on Library asks users to verify that books actually exist before making a loan request because AI invents book titles in ~tech

    Wes
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    Ultimately LLMs are just a tool, and like other tools they cannot be applied to every task. You wouldn't blame a hammer for being bad at installing screws, would you? LLMs as a tool are designed...

    Ultimately LLMs are just a tool, and like other tools they cannot be applied to every task. You wouldn't blame a hammer for being bad at installing screws, would you?

    LLMs as a tool are designed for generating tokens. They build a statistical model through extensive training, and can apply this for text completion and transformation tasks. If you use them for this purpose, they hardly ever hallucinate. This makes them exceptional for data manipulation, translation, editing, error detection, and so on.

    What LLMs are not however is a database of information. If you ask them for specific facts, especially for recent or niche topics, a hallucination is very likely. Getting the correct answer is a statistical probability, and one based on a number of factors probably unknown to the asker. If somebody takes information from an LLM at face value, they are not using it responsibly. Essentially all LLM providers includes warnings on this topic before they may be used, but maybe they should be more aggressively plastered.

    This doesn't mean that LLMs are useless for fact finding. They still often provide an excellent introduction to a topic. They also allow you to ask the questions that you don't really know how to ask yet; you can't Google a term you don't know the name for yet. But their limitations need to be kept in mind, and they should be used more as a jumping off point than the final say on any topic.

    Twenty years ago we needed to learn how to effectively use search engines. Which keywords to use, the order to place them in, and the search operators to use. LLMs are really no different. Using them effectively requires practice, and their features and limitations are still being worked out.

    When you asked Copilot for a list of books, those titles may or may not have existed. If it's a common enough topic then there's a good chance that information was actually incorporated into its model, but you'd have to double check to be sure. When you asked it again however if they were real, you primed it to respond in a certain way. It was generating the most likely tokens based on your follow-up question, which is why it went on to claim they weren't real. This is a hallucination. In reality, it had no idea if they were real or not. Such is their nature.

    Hammers are useful, and so are LLMs. They are more complex tools though, and require more practice to get right. But even in their early form, they're providing a lot of value when used correctly, and are definitely worth keeping around in your toolbox.

    22 votes
  6. Comment on Save Point: A game deal roundup for the week of July 7 in ~games

    Wes
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    Build your own Jubilant Bundle, a rock solid bundle from Fanatical. Includes many small but well-polished games. I can personally recommend Ittle Dew, but there's lots of other 90%+ rated games...

    Build your own Jubilant Bundle, a rock solid bundle from Fanatical. Includes many small but well-polished games. I can personally recommend Ittle Dew, but there's lots of other 90%+ rated games too.

    2 votes
  7. Comment on Google Chrome ships a default, hidden extension that allows code on *.google.com access to private APIs, including your current CPU usage in ~tech

  8. Comment on The asymmetry of nudges in ~tech

    Wes
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    I think technical users really underestimate the number of bad extensions that are out there. There's over 100,000 extensions available for Chrome alone. Extensions with even a small number of...
    • Exemplary

    I think technical users really underestimate the number of bad extensions that are out there. There's over 100,000 extensions available for Chrome alone. Extensions with even a small number of users begin to receive pressure from bad actors, to sell the extension, or to partner in some way. See Temptations of an open-source browser extension developer.

    The best method browser vendors have to curb this problem is their review process. They use a mixture of automated and manual approvals to check the code when it hits their servers. The problem is that extensions can push silent updates, loading and running code from third-party sources. This is the chief mechanism by which extension malware is spread.

    Regular users (that is, the majority of Chrome's userbase) have been the primary target of these attacks. They don't understand why their search results are suddenly going through weird-looking redirects, or they why their CPU usage is 5% higher because something is running in the background. Google has been fielding these issues for years, and it's largely from bad code that is bypassing their review process. MV3 is a direct response to that problem.

    Yes, the new API is more limiting. It disallows some features that were possible before. On the flip side it's also safer and faster. Whether this is an improvement depends on your own perspective. These articles are usually written by and for the power user, but rarely is the regular user given much consideration. This article is one of the few to do so.

    Regarding ad blocking, which is only a small portion of the greater MV3 changes, I'm mostly annoyed at the misinformation in this area. The change from webRequest to declarativeNetRequest leaves intact 95% of current blocking capabilities. The new API is clearly designed to allow ad blocking. Google has been updating the API from feedback (see rule limits and dynamic rules), participated in the Ad Filtering Dev Conference, worked with popular ad blocking companies, and added automatic approvals in the review process for adblockers with static rule changes. There's been a handful of great MV3 ad blockers in the extension store for over a year now, including ones by uBlock Origin and AdGuard. So the idea that they've "declared war on adblockers" is really unfounded. In many ways, they've bent over backwards to accommodate them.

    Of course, I did say 95% intact. Sophisticated adblockers do rely on some of the dynamic code functionality discussed above for complex ads. This might be used on sites like Twitch and YouTube where it's not simply a network request, but needs dynamic logic to determine where the ad is. YouTube (under Google) has been fighting against adblockers recently, and it's reasonable to assume they will take advantage of any restrictions in the adblocking code to further their aims. So I don't completely give Google the benefit of the doubt here, even if the decisions are primarily coming from the Chrome team.

    Still, I think MV3 will be a positive change on the whole of it. It plugs all the major holes that bad actors have been abusing to take advantage of people. It prioritizes performance with the removal of background pages. It still makes it trivial to block the vast majority of ads, and does so in a more privacy-preserving way. The "MV3 adpocalypse" has been largely overstated, and I'm not sure that blocking that remaining 5% really justifies all the problems that comes with it.

    24 votes
  9. Comment on Noctua releases new CPU cooler NH-D15 G2 and NF-A14x25r G2 fan in ~comp

    Wes
    Link Parent
    I spent a long time shopping around for a CPU cooler last year, and after scouring reviews finally bought the "reddit recommendation" of a Thermalright cooler. Not the lauded Peerless Assassin...

    I spent a long time shopping around for a CPU cooler last year, and after scouring reviews finally bought the "reddit recommendation" of a Thermalright cooler. Not the lauded Peerless Assassin (PA120), but its minor upgrade the Phantom Spirit (PS120SE). My temps dropped a whopping 15 degrees under load from the stock Intel cooler I was using before.

    What you're saying is still true though. Noctua does focus more on acoustics than other companies, and they do a better job of finding pitches that are less annoying to humans. This doesn't show up in direct decibel tests, however I have seen a couple reviewers comment on it directly.

    While pitches are something I'm sensitive to, it turns out it just wasn't a problem. My CPU never gets hot enough to reach those extreme levels of cooling where the fans are on max. So at this point paying 3-4x more for 1-2 degrees of cooling just doesn't make a lot of sense to me. Especially if you want to go for a non-beige color, as the Chromax models have an even higher premium.

    I know Noctua has a lot of brand loyalty, but I think it's fair to say that the competitors have largely caught up. I respect them a lot for their engineering focus, but I'd probably only recommend Team Beige and Brown for absolute enthusiasts these days.

    7 votes
  10. Comment on Microsoft CEO of AI claims online content is 'freeware' [and can be used to train LLMs in the absence of a specific directives from the author against this] in ~tech

    Wes
    Link Parent
    Beyond Skyrim - Bruma has released, so there is at least one. They continue to work on other provinces. From what I understand a lot of work is cross-province, which makes it more difficult to...

    unlike all the fan projects in the same engine with even longer dev times like beyond skyrim (not even one province is complete)

    Beyond Skyrim - Bruma has released, so there is at least one. They continue to work on other provinces. From what I understand a lot of work is cross-province, which makes it more difficult to show off.

    Other fan projects like Skyblivion haven't yet released, but they publish regular video updates, and just recently published some standalone mods for the systems they've created. One of which is a new lockpicking minigame that looks very nice.

    Skywind also posts regular updates, as does Project Tamriel. I know it's frustrating they're not playable yet, but they are very involved projects, and they have few hands contributing. Most of these projects are developed by volunteers working in their free time, whereas Bethesda had 300-400 employees working on Starfield.

    I'd like to also mention OpenMW. It's not in the same engine, but has been developed and polished to the point of being the best way to play Morrowind. There's even a multiplayer fork that is very good.

    1 vote
  11. Comment on ChatGPT is bullshit in ~tech

    Wes
    Link Parent
    Project Zero was playing with it recently and shared some thoughts you might be interested in. The Google Security blog also found some success in using it for reporting security incidents. It...

    Project Zero was playing with it recently and shared some thoughts you might be interested in. The Google Security blog also found some success in using it for reporting security incidents.

    It seems like every domain is currently experimenting with how LLMs might help (or hinder) their chosen niche. It's interesting to see this learning process take place across so many fields at once.

    5 votes
  12. Comment on ChatGPT is bullshit in ~tech

    Wes
    Link Parent
    Token generators with self-attention mechanisms (ie. LLMs) are definitely still AI, as defined in the field. They're the latest step beyond traditional machine learning and neural nets, which are...

    Token generators with self-attention mechanisms (ie. LLMs) are definitely still AI, as defined in the field. They're the latest step beyond traditional machine learning and neural nets, which are also considered to be AI.

    They're not AGI, but nobody is claiming that they are (except perhaps for Blake Lemoine). I haven't seen anybody else make the argument that these chatbots are conscious.

    The term hallucinate stems from a technical article, written by one of the foremost scientists working in this area. It was adopted by others in the field and now describes a specific class of problem. Arguing over the language feels like prescriptivism at best, and bikeshedding at worst.

    Personally, the term "hallucinate" reminds me of Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, and I like that it removes any assumptions of intent or veracity. But it doesn't really matter what gets used, so long as people understand the limitations and capabilities of these tools.

    7 votes
  13. Comment on ChatGPT is bullshit in ~tech

    Wes
    Link Parent
    Honestly, judging by the abstract and introduction, and a quick skim through the paper itself, this seems to just be another pedantic argument about how we should refer to AI output....

    Honestly, judging by the abstract and introduction, and a quick skim through the paper itself, this seems to just be another pedantic argument about how we should refer to AI output. Unfortunately, wrapping a blog post in a white paper format doesn't make the content any more insightful.

    It's probably meant to be tongue-in-cheek, but I think there's more interesting papers to read on AI.

    10 votes
  14. Comment on What's our thoughts on Perplexity.ai for search? in ~tech

    Wes
    Link Parent
    That's a little misleading. Perplexity uses snippets with attribution in the same way search engines do. This has historically been considered a fair use application. It doesn't fit the definition...

    That's a little misleading. Perplexity uses snippets with attribution in the same way search engines do. This has historically been considered a fair use application. It doesn't fit the definition of plagiarism as they are not claiming this content as their own.

    Additionally, Perplexity does respect robots.txt for training their AI model. They only do not respect it when following a user's request to scan a page, which is the correct behaviour. robots.txt is specifically for automated web crawlers or spiders. User agents, meaning tools that follow a user's commands, are not subject to robots.txt. Your web browser and command line applications like wget do not follow robots.txt either, because they are acting as user agents, not as robots.

    15 votes
  15. Comment on At some point, JavaScript becomes indefensible in ~comp

    Wes
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    Sandbox escapes are still exceedingly rare, even in light of these hardware weaknesses. Both Chrome and Firefox have implemented process isolation for different contexts which largely mitigates...

    It couldn't be done before Spectre and Meltdown and Rowhammer, because sandboxing a nontrivial runtime is a practical impossibility, and it certainly can't be done after.

    Sandbox escapes are still exceedingly rare, even in light of these hardware weaknesses. Both Chrome and Firefox have implemented process isolation for different contexts which largely mitigates rowhammer. Since modern browsers are evergreen, they also implemented mitigations extremely quickly to address Spectre/Meltdown by reducing the resolution of performance.now() and by disabling SharedArrayBuffer. More permanent solutions were then worked on to establish a secure context before allowing access to these APIs.

    Realistically, it's almost impossible for a webpage to be able to do real harm to your computer in the modern day. Security practices have evolved considerably since the early days of the web. Exploits are uncommon, and numerous are required to build a sandbox escape. Most vulnerabilities are patched within hours of being discovered.

    Don't like Bitcoin? Too bad, there's no machine-distinguishable difference between a Bitcoin miner and a sufficiently-inefficient text-only webpage

    Mining performs the same math function in an endless loop. This makes it fairly easy to detect heuristically. Mozilla offers to block these in Firefox, and these domains are frequently tagged by Google's Safe Browsing service, too.

    14 votes
  16. Comment on What gaming genre could use a renaming? in ~games

    Wes
    Link Parent
    While I'm fairly familiar with the history of most of these genre names, I do appreciate the effort to explain them. Though my comment was more an attempt to satirize some of the terms in a modern...

    While I'm fairly familiar with the history of most of these genre names, I do appreciate the effort to explain them. Though my comment was more an attempt to satirize some of the terms in a modern light. eg. Counter Strike is of course not an RTS game, but it is played in real-time and involves a lot of strategy.

    I think most were answering the question posed by the thread, and considering some better names that might better reflect their current definitions (some suggestions here include "gatepunk", "search action", and "curated/emergent RPG").

    For RPGs specifically, while modern RPGs do often feature dialogue choices or character customization, they also frequently include world exploration, leveling mechanics, inventory systems, and some kind of combat. As far as genre scopes go, it is one of the widest.

    1 vote
  17. Comment on What gaming genre could use a renaming? in ~games

    Wes
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    All of them! They're all wrong! RPG is extremely vague. In what game do you not play some sort of a role? Most RPGs could better be described as adventure games, except that already has a meaning....

    All of them! They're all wrong!

    RPG is extremely vague. In what game do you not play some sort of a role? Most RPGs could better be described as adventure games, except that already has a meaning. Adventure games share a lot of overlap with point and click or puzzle games, but only sometimes.

    But that's pretty vague, so let's be more specific. There's JRPG, which is an RPG from Japan, except not really. And CRPG, so it's playable on Computers? Or ARPG, which sometimes refers to action games like Dark Souls, but just as often refers to top-down Diablo-esque games. Neat.

    Oh I know, Strategy games! The only genre which involves using strategy. Sorry Counter-Strike players. Wait, does that mean shooters are Real-Time Strategy?

    At least the concept of Survival games makes sense. We'll ignore the fact that the term "Survivor games" is looming overhead. (I much prefer "Bullet Heaven").

    It's all a bit of a mess. There's clearly a lot of history imbued in each of these genre names, and you can measure the change and development through that. Still, it would be nice to go back to the drawing board. Ask some questions like "How does the game actually play?", and avoid some of the weird defining traits we've ended up with.

    Realistically though, I don't think a perfect schema could ever be created to slot games into genres. They're too complicated, and cross too many boundaries. And thank goodness, because games sure would be boring if they all played the same.

    I do think however that we could create a sort of tagging system for common gameplay systems and mechanics. For example, a game might feature permadeath. That doesn't necessarily mean it's a roguelike, but it tells you a little about how it plays. Maybe another game features resource gathering in the world and crafting of resources. It could be a voxel survival game, or it might just be Elden Ring. Still, the culmination of these tags would actually tell you a fair bit about how the game plays, whereas "action adventure" tells you almost nothing.

    19 votes
  18. Comment on TDK claims insane energy density in solid-state battery breakthrough in ~tech

    Wes
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    A high-density battery isn't necessarily an extraordinary claim. The problem is that effective batteries need to have a whole bunch of positive traits: Safe to use. Low risk of combusting. Fast...

    A high-density battery isn't necessarily an extraordinary claim. The problem is that effective batteries need to have a whole bunch of positive traits:

    • Safe to use. Low risk of combusting.
    • Fast charging, so devices can be used in day-to-day tasks
    • Fast discharging, so it can actually power modern electronics
    • Reusable. A battery that breaks down after 30 cycles won't cut it.
    • Stable across different temperature ranges
    • High density/energy storage
    • Low-cost (eg. not reliant on rare-Earth elements)
    • Able to be mass-produced with current manufacturing methods
    • Non-toxic and recyclable are also big pluses

    So far, lithium-ion does the best job at meeting all of these traits. There's a large number of interesting battery research projects that excel at one of these traits, but fail at others. It's rare though that battery technology has a revolution. Most progress has been iterative, though it has been steady.

    Even if it doesn't make its way into consumer electronics, this kind of research is occasionally still useful to more esoteric applications like space travel, where the needs are different from that of regular consumers.

    edit: Typo

    31 votes
  19. Comment on Is there a sweetspot for www programming btw. WordPress and tiny web? in ~tech

    Wes
    Link Parent
    I expect that any popular SSG will offer a basic template/theme, along with detailed docs detailing how it works. You mentioned an interest in Metalsmith. Their docs include a getting started...

    If you happen to know of any good online learning ressources that would equip me to start laying out the basic structure of a site coded with SSG, please drop a link.

    I expect that any popular SSG will offer a basic template/theme, along with detailed docs detailing how it works. You mentioned an interest in Metalsmith. Their docs include a getting started guide along with a directory structure for how the files are laid out, and some starter projects below.

    Most other SSGs will offer similar:

    While the official documentation is often the best, any popular tool will also have third-party tutorials, videos, etc, to suit your preferred style of learning. I'm afraid I don't have any specific recommendations beyond that.

    I don't know why my website loads reCaptcha -- I suspect it might be the newsletter sign-up form anti-spam functionality

    Yep, it looks like SendFox is initiating the request. That's valid then. I figured maybe it was all done through network headers, but captchas on forms are unfortunately pretty essential these days.

    Best of luck with your new project.

    1 vote
  20. Comment on Better reply features in ~tildes

    Wes
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    Just a few points from a web dev to possibly clear up some misconceptions. Tildes doesn't actually have a spoiler tag. There is an open issue to add one, but unfortunately development is mostly...

    Just a few points from a web dev to possibly clear up some misconceptions.

    Tildes doesn't actually have a spoiler tag. There is an open issue to add one, but unfortunately development is mostly stalled right now.

    The tag you're describing is for summarizing long text and allowing expansion for details, sometimes called an accordion. It's been somewhat co-opted by the community to act as a spoiler tag because it does allow you to hide information. That said, it's not well-suited to this purpose. Its text still shows in topic previews, and it's exclusively a block-level element, meaning it can't be used inline >!like this!< would be.

    I think it'd be okay to add the word Spoiler to the docs to make it easily searchable until there's a better solution, but it's best not to think of summary/details blocks as dedicated spoiler tags. They're just a kludge.

    As for the ability to grab and resize text boxes, that isn't really a website feature so much as a browser feature. They're added automatically, so a lot of websites have issues where dropping the corner underneath another element will lose it. That said, there are still ways developers can influence its behaviour. Setting a min and max width on the textbox itself will hardcode certain limits. The trick would be setting a max width equal to the page's width, before the scrollbar is visible. Alternatively, the resize property can lock it to vertical resizing only, though that may not be a preferred solution.

    Regarding the live preview, personally I find those quite distracting while typing and prefer Tildes' solution of having a second tab for Previews. Though I recognize that I've been using Markdown for 15 years and only need a quick check at the end of complex comments, and that others might benefit more from immediate feedback. I feel like that might be a good candidate for an extension, though because the Preview is server-sided it could increase the server costs by updating it on live keystrokes.

    Another user pointed out the Formatting Toolbar userscript already, so I'll not go over it. Though there are a number of other extensions and scripts available for Tildes here.

    23 votes