hungariantoast's recent activity

  1. Comment on What's the cheapest food that makes you really happy? in ~talk

    hungariantoast
    Link
    Toast and barbecue sauce is an easy and cheap snack. Butter optional. I really like a good "Carolina barbecue" or "South Carolina mustard" kind of sauce. Hotdog on a piece of white bread. Chicken...

    Toast and barbecue sauce is an easy and cheap snack. Butter optional. I really like a good "Carolina barbecue" or "South Carolina mustard" kind of sauce.

    Hotdog on a piece of white bread.

    Chicken tikka masala can be made cheap enough if you buy ingredients in bulk. Even better (for your wallet, not necessarily your taste buds) if you can buy spice blends in bulk and can skip buying individual spices.

    If you really want to save money, you can 86 the chicken and still get an excellent curry sauce to have with rice.

    I make "white people chicken tikka masala" just about every weekend because I am able to buy stuff in bulk at a local market.

    4 votes
  2. Comment on On password managers in ~comp

    hungariantoast
    Link Parent
    lmao I didn't even know that was there. I was doing this: Menu -> Settings -> Privacy & Security -> Saved Logins -> Site -> Copy Did they just add that item to the menu in version 89 with the UI...

    lmao I didn't even know that was there. I was doing this: Menu -> Settings -> Privacy & Security -> Saved Logins -> Site -> Copy

    Did they just add that item to the menu in version 89 with the UI update? Or has it been there for a while? I always just type about:logins into the address bar so...

    1 vote
  3. Comment on On password managers in ~comp

    hungariantoast
    Link Parent
    This is really the only major bad thing about the article's suggestion to just use the built-in browser password manager: It's a pain in the ass in both Firefox and Chrome to get those passwords...

    and copying them out of chrome would be pretty awkward

    This is really the only major bad thing about the article's suggestion to just use the built-in browser password manager:

    It's a pain in the ass in both Firefox and Chrome to get those passwords and use them in applications that are not the web browser.

    If accessing and using the browser's password management feature could be made easier and not, at least in Firefox, require something like six clicks after launching the browser, it'd be pretty much good enough for any normal user compared to something like KeePassXC or Bitwarden.

    And let's not kid ourselves with the excuse of "that's outside the scope of web browsers". Web browsers have no scope these days 🤣

    but only thought about his own use case

    Isn't it kind of weird to interpret this article as if the author were writing it for non-technical users? I mean, this is a technical article, written by a programmer, posted to that programmer's personal website, syndicated to the most technical group on Tildes. It doesn't really strike me as an article that was written for someone such as your dad, but instead more for someone like you or me.

    I guess what I'm getting at is this isn't really a case of the author forgetting non-technical users exist, as much as it's a case of the author targeting technical users with this content purposefully.

    8 votes
  4. Comment on After staff revolt, Freenode management takes over hundreds of IRC channels for 'policy violations' in ~tech

    hungariantoast
    Link
    Something I have not been able to figure out, maybe just because I have not read enough former-staffer resignations, or don't know enough about Freenode's underlying technology, is how exactly...

    Something I have not been able to figure out, maybe just because I have not read enough former-staffer resignations, or don't know enough about Freenode's underlying technology, is how exactly Lee's purchase of Freenode Limited enabled him to take control over the hardware that actually runs Freenode?

    And why didn't a staffer just nuke the network when it became clear that a hostile takeover was imminent? Would doing so involve the threat of legal reprecussions? Was the infrastructure of the network distributed too widely to make this possible?

    It's a moot point now I guess, considering the-castle-that-is-Freenode has been stormed, but I'd really like to have a better understanding of the legal and technological history of this event, because knowing exactly who fucked up, and what their fuckups were, could provide valuable lessons in the future.

    3 votes
  5. Less than one week after Israel bombed the office of the Associated Press in Gaza, a Jewish employee of the agency has been fired for pro-Palestinian social media posts that sparked right-wing outrage

    An interview with Emily Wilder, recent Stanford grad fired from AP job over criticisms of Israel Outcry after Associated Press journalist fired amid row over pro-Palestinian views The Associated...
    13 votes
  6. Comment on Apple’s software head Craig Federighi openly admits that the Mac has a security problem in ~tech

    hungariantoast
    Link Parent
    This article is fine. By the time it was posted, other articles by Bloomberg and Verge included no real extra information, just additional words. I went with this article because it was shorter...

    This article is fine. By the time it was posted, other articles by Bloomberg and Verge included no real extra information, just additional words. I went with this article because it was shorter but still good.

    If you have a suggestion for a different link for this topic, you're more than welcome to suggest it.

    4 votes
  7. Comment on Apple’s software head Craig Federighi openly admits that the Mac has a security problem in ~tech

    hungariantoast
    Link Parent
    Yeah, like just taking the same approach as macOS and putting in the "speed bumps" you mentioned would be great

    Yeah, like just taking the same approach as macOS and putting in the "speed bumps" you mentioned would be great

    1 vote
  8. Comment on The abolition of work in ~humanities

    hungariantoast
    Link Parent
    I haven't got a chance to read the article yet because wow that's a lot of words and it's very late here and I really should be sleeping, but the antiwork movement is a real thing and, in my...

    I haven't got a chance to read the article yet because wow that's a lot of words and it's very late here and I really should be sleeping, but the antiwork movement is a real thing and, in my experience, is mostly concerned with the abolition of things like wage slavery, working jobs we hate, and being forced to perform useless menial labor just to barely survive. As a movement it's brought to light serious questions about our society. I really really hope that's what this article is about and if it is, it's 100% worth discussing and thinking about.

    5 votes
  9. Comment on Apple’s software head Craig Federighi openly admits that the Mac has a security problem in ~tech

    hungariantoast
    Link Parent
    I don't think the solution here though is to take the keys away from the user like iOS does. The choice between having ultimate control or no control over the devices you pay for is no choice at...

    I don't think the solution here though is to take the keys away from the user like iOS does.

    The choice between having ultimate control or no control over the devices you pay for is no choice at all.

    It's really a massive failing of the education system that the general population is as tech illiterate as they are (tech companies and capitalism and their incentives also get a lot of the blame). However, that does not mean we cannot actually educate the public on common sense computing and basic security principles, no matter how badly tech companies don't want that to happen.

    I don't know, Android works fine for billions of people. The smartphone duopoly is shit, I hate it, but Apple letting users actually use their iPhones in non-blessed ways isn't going to make it significantly worse. If Apple is really so scared of third-party apps enabling malware to bust open all your intimate data they collect from your phone, they can just disable access to those features if users choose to use third-party apps. (The community that pops up outside of Apple's control will probably reimplment it all better, safer, and faster than Apple.)


    And if I could just share my big brain ultimate hot take real quick, because it feels good:

    It should be legally required of Apple to not only provide an easy-to-access avenue for users to install apps from outside the App Store, but the source code of iOS and macOS should be made free under a federally backed open-source license.

    Oh, and something about right-to-repair.

    2 votes