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    1. Link bug

      Test with https:// takes to intended place. [Test with https://](https://example.com) Without keeps you on Tildes!! [Without](example.com)

      4 votes
    2. ?

      If you add 2 backticks to an empty space in a blockquote it makes a kind of hole. your Odd? Admittedly the subtlety is top notch.

      5 votes
    3. Exhaustive Markdown test

      This is a post in ~test about Tildes! (See also: the ~tildes group.) The author is @zlsa. Oh, I almost forgot to link to the Wikipedia article on Reaction Control Systems. Click to view the hidden...

      This is a post in ~test about Tildes! (See also: the ~tildes group.) The author is @zlsa.

      Oh, I almost forgot to link to the Wikipedia article on Reaction Control Systems.

      Click to view the hidden text

      Here's all the hidden text.

      It can have markdown in it too.

      H1: This is a very long header.

      H2: This one is just as long.

      H3: Short.

      H4: How do you even tell these apart!?

      H5: come on, this is nuts
      H6: Six levels deep. You need professional help.

      Blockquotes

      let x = 42;
      
      function transmogrify(value) {
          return value * 4
      }
      

      Now, if you run transmogrify(x), you get 167 168. Removing the strikethrough is left as an exercise for the reader (that's you.)


      There's some pretty advanced stuff going on here. The cars are almost self-driving; but full autonomy is at least 3 months away, if not 6.

      • Markdown unordered list support: check.
        1. Ordered list support: check.
        2. Yep, this works.
      • And back to the unordered list, as expected.

      Mountain Height of Summit
      Mount Everest 8,848m
      K2 8,611m

      And now for some minor features:

      • I forgot a word.
      • E = mc2 and H2O

      And now for something completely different.

      I'm baby craft beer vape freegan sriracha. Jean shorts chicharrones trust fund, 90's gochujang la croix cold-pressed. Pinterest kinfolk slow-carb green juice, street art wayfarers quinoa jianbing organic edison bulb. Semiotics craft beer tumblr bushwick organic affogato lumbersexual crucifix direct trade dreamcatcher echo park kinfolk. Selfies green juice chambray helvetica iPhone snackwave master cleanse.

      Drinking vinegar live-edge four loko, chambray edison bulb blue bottle stumptown etsy snackwave la croix activated charcoal fingerstache shaman hot chicken locavore. Fixie twee godard offal. Ramps echo park beard kogi mustache deep v everyday carry DIY heirloom. Forage poke vaporware whatever, man bun chicharrones fashion axe disrupt. DIY kickstarter 3 wolf moon you probably haven't heard of them drinking vinegar authentic narwhal, 90's pug taxidermy pitchfork next level.

      Artisan palo santo blue bottle hashtag squid asymmetrical XOXO ennui craft beer readymade cred mlkshk 8-bit. Forage celiac woke, kickstarter hell of normcore chartreuse try-hard cray. Food truck edison bulb PBR&B cloud bread vegan leggings pug dreamcatcher cardigan intelligentsia. 3 wolf moon hashtag palo santo migas cardigan ethical bespoke chartreuse tote bag godard truffaut man bun. Celiac brunch echo park mustache thundercats cornhole raclette chicharrones meditation hammock kogi vegan sustainable. Raw denim vape affogato slow-carb meh iceland food truck kale chips health goth gastropub migas chillwave.

      Viral pug kitsch, celiac aesthetic kickstarter small batch chicharrones. Direct trade health goth viral chia actually meh cronut chicharrones. Thundercats man bun scenester VHS. Mumblecore mixtape kickstarter chartreuse pinterest cold-pressed. Leggings retro vice tumeric distillery jean shorts flexitarian, chicharrones narwhal.

      Copper mug gluten-free pickled, you probably haven't heard of them banh mi roof party pop-up coloring book brooklyn vexillologist 3 wolf moon keytar. Enamel pin chambray tbh taiyaki cardigan tumblr cold-pressed. Yuccie activated charcoal ugh, wolf chicharrones literally trust fund aesthetic tattooed vice cornhole polaroid. Selvage XOXO sriracha tacos +1 hashtag everyday carry.

      Dummy text? More like dummy thicc text, amirite?

      A1 B1 C1 D1 E1
      FANCYPANTS AWESOMELY COMPLEX TEXT FANCYPANTS AWESOMELY COMPLEX TEXT FANCYPANTS AWESOMELY COMPLEX TEXT FANCYPANTS AWESOMELY COMPLEX TEXT FANCYPANTS AWESOMELY COMPLEX TEXT
      5 votes
    4. AMA Announcement: u/MetArtScroll will do an AMA in ~test tomorrow as specified in the post

      Who: u/MetArtScroll (my main account) Where: ~test, Edit: more specifically, here When: April 1, 2020, between 17:23 GMT and 18:37 GMT ( 19:23 to 20:37 CEST, +1 02:08 to +1 03:22 Eucla Time, +1...

      Who: u/MetArtScroll (my main account)

      Where: ~test, Edit: more specifically, here

      When: April 1, 2020, between 17:23 GMT and 18:37 GMT
      (
      19:23 to 20:37 CEST,
      +1 02:08 to +1 03:22 Eucla Time,
      +1 07:08 to +1 08:22 Chatham Islands Time,
      +1 01:23 to +1 02:37 CST,
      22:53 to +1 00:07 IST,
      14:23 to 15:37 BRT,
      +1 02:23 to +1 03:37 JST,
      20:23 to 21:37 IDT,
      +1 04:23 to +1 05:37 AEDT,
      13:23 to 14:37 EDT
      )why this time period

      We are looking forward for the AMA!

      1 vote
    5. Can you view comments in Markdown?

      Overall, I am not sure this ad is worth discussing. At the same time though, I feel like such a discussion amounts to little more than political gossip. Needless to say, I am on the fence. I also...

      Overall, I am not sure this ad is worth discussing.

      At the same time though, I feel like such a discussion amounts to little more than political gossip.

      Needless to say, I am on the fence.

      I also think that a post to an analysis arguing why this ad indicates something important would have been far better than a post to the ad directly. But there does seem to be a constructive discussion to be had about the ad and its wider implications and relevance.

      Even better would be to just wait and post articles with their own analyses.

      To be honest, I posted them more or less because they were "substance-less", but looking back, I am pretty okay with the idea of having articles like that removed in the future, especially since the first one I posted received some pretty wild comments.

      I know you said:

      But I do think, either now or as the race continues, the bar will need to be raised for what is acceptable to post here.

      3 votes
    6. Pinging nic many times to see if it registers in his inbox

      @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic...

      @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic 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@nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic 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@nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic 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@nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic @nic

      Don't worry I don't have anything against you lmao

      6 votes
    7. Linkify mentions test

      @Tildes hey there @Tildes hey there Above markdown: @Tildes hey there \@Tildes hey there Relevant issue https://gitlab.com/tildes/tildes/issues/622

      3 votes
    8. <abbr>, <q>, <ruby>

      The <abbr title="Federal Bureau of Investigations">FBI</abbr> are watching us. <q>No!</q>, I shouted. <ruby>明日<rp>(</rp><rt>Ashita</rt><rp>)</rp></ruby>...

      The <abbr title="Federal Bureau of Investigations">FBI</abbr> are watching us.

      <q>No!</q>, I shouted.

      <ruby>明日<rp>(</rp><rt>Ashita</rt><rp>)</rp></ruby>


      https://gitlab.com/tildes/tildes/issues/612

      2 votes
    9. Borked up syntax highlighting (for a GitLab issue)

      (1) This works okay: typedef struct metres metres_t; int metres_get_value(metres_t *x); metres_t *metres_add(metres_t *x, metres_t *y); metres_t *metres_new(int value); void metres_delete(metres_t...

      (1) This works okay:

      typedef struct metres metres_t;
      
      int       metres_get_value(metres_t *x);
      metres_t *metres_add(metres_t *x, metres_t *y);
      metres_t *metres_new(int value);
      void      metres_delete(metres_t *x);
      

      (2) This works badly:

      • typedef struct metres metres_t;
        

        int metres_get_value(metres_t *x);
        metres_t *metres_add(metres_t *x, metres_t *y);
        metres_t *metres_new(int value);
        void metres_delete(metres_t *x);

      (3) This works slightly better, but the list bullet is weird:

      • typedef struct metres metres_t;
        
        int       metres_get_value(metres_t *x);
        metres_t *metres_add(metres_t *x, metres_t *y);
        metres_t *metres_new(int value);
        void      metres_delete(metres_t *x);
        
      4 votes
    10. Group and User links don't get `.link-group` and `.link-user` when linked manually

      Automatically linkified (~test): ~test gets the proper color because of .link-group. Manually linkified ([~test](https://tildes.net/~test)): ~test doesn't get the color. Automatically linkified...

      Automatically linkified (~test): ~test gets the proper color because of .link-group.

      Manually linkified ([~test](https://tildes.net/~test)): ~test doesn't get the color.


      Automatically linkified (@Bauke): @Bauke gets the proper color because of .link-user.

      Manually linkified ([@Bauke](https://tildes.net/user/Bauke)): @Bauke doesn't get the color.

      3 votes
    11. Markdown in *My* Title? It's More Likely Than You Think

      It wouldn't make sense for the vast majority of markdown to render in the title, although italics would be a useful exception for names of species such as Patella vulgata. It may be useful to...

      It wouldn't make sense for the vast majority of markdown to render in the title, although italics would be a useful exception for names of species such as Patella vulgata. It may be useful to handle bolding and italics as one-off cases in the title with regex, assuming support isn't already available.

      3 votes
    12. Neato

      Vulgarity on the topic listing page is undesirable, so let's try to be friends? Yes. Now is the time for being wholesome.

      3 votes
    13. html in url?

      oops, had a space in url last time. So still not a valid link as topic link But does make a weird un-clickable link in md. While the link does not go anywhere, could a malicious link do anything...

      oops, had a space in url last time.
      So still not a valid link as topic link

      But does make a weird un-clickable link in md.

      While the link does not go anywhere, could a malicious link do anything bad sec-wise?

      fyi, the link is to: data:text/html,<h1>Hello%2C%20World!<%2Fh1>

      1 vote
    14. testing self-mentions

      I bet this is already taken care of, but if I type @Silbern or /u/Silbern , will I get a notification I wonder? Edit: Nope, but someone else replied to a comment right before I hit refresh, so for...

      I bet this is already taken care of, but if I type @Silbern or /u/Silbern , will I get a notification I wonder?

      Edit: Nope, but someone else replied to a comment right before I hit refresh, so for a brief moment, thought I did. Thought I was quite clever for a moment, but alas.

      2 votes
    15. The Fitnessgram Pacer Test

      Warning: this post may contain spoilers

      The FitnessGram Pacer Test is a multistage aerobic capacity test that progressively gets more difficult as it continues. The 20 meter pacer test will begin in 30 seconds. Line up at the start. The running speed starts slowly but gets faster each minute after you hear this signal bodeboop. A sing lap should be completed every time you hear this sound. ding Remember to run in a straight line and run as long as possible. The second time you fail to complete a lap before the sound, your test is over. The test will begin on the word start. On your mark. Get ready!… Start. ding

      9 votes
    16. Cake Day Congratulations Topic

      Tildes has celerated its first birthday on April 26, 2019. The purpose of this topic is to let users be congratulated on their personal Tildes anniversaries. I recommend sorting the comments in...

      Tildes has celerated its first birthday on April 26, 2019.
      The purpose of this topic is to let users be congratulated on their personal Tildes anniversaries.

      I recommend sorting the comments in this topic by newest first.

      2 votes
    17. testing my precious linksies markdown

      no https://, link to news.ycombinator.com Link to HN with https://, same link Link to HN I think the first one will link to tildes.net/abc/news.ycombinator.com which is wrong, but hey what do I...
      1. no https://, link to news.ycombinator.com Link to HN

      2. with https://, same link Link to HN

      I think the first one will link to tildes.net/abc/news.ycombinator.com which is wrong, but hey what do I know.

      edit1: OK, so yeah.. correct assumption. Prolly normal?

      edit2: new link, no subdomain, no https:// YC Link

      So yeah always need a properly formatted URL, otherwise will assume that it's a relative link.. prolly how the web works, but is it ideal? I will check on reddit for comparison.

      edit3: reddit test: Using markdown, reddit requires a fully valid url which includes the protocol. But using the new fancy editor, it does not.

      Not sure what I accomplished here :)

      1 vote
    18. Testing

      Warning: this post may contain spoilers

      This is a public service announcement. This is only a test.

      4 votes
    19. this is exactly eighty characters this is who i am i am i am i am i am i am i am

      So, just from playing around with the width of the web page, it seems like the column that houses the topic and comments is fixed at a maximum width. In other words, it doesn't get wider beyond a...

      So, just from playing around with the width of the web page, it seems like the column that houses the topic and comments is fixed at a maximum width. In other words, it doesn't get wider beyond a certain point, no matter how wide the web page gets. This column, which I'll refer to as the "comments column" takes up 1,400 pixels on my


      • We know that each comment indentation takes an additional 21 pixels (Does it take 21 on mobile?)
      • We know the width of the user's browser's webpage
      • We know the width of the "comments column" that contains all comments
      • Using this information we can mathematically determine how many indentations it would take to reduce the available width for text in comments to be below a specific number of characters. (Eighty on desktop? Forty on mobile? Make the target character amount variable relative to the screen size below a certain threshold? (Below a certain screen size.))
      • At that point, we start listing comments linearly, optionally marking them with a dotted border, a *(Reply to above comment)* note, or a "Chan-like" ID system like @cfabbro suggested:

      Edit: Attaching unique ID#s to comments and directly referencing which ID# the replies are to (similar to how Chan boards operate), might also help steer people's expectations and make it easier to follow these flattened threads as well. And a unique ID is already attached to each comment in the form of its HTML anchor anyways (e.g. this comment is #comment-32j8) ... so merely exposing them and referencing them openly probably wouldn't be a difficult change.

      I Personally like the ID system better. It doesn't have to replace the Link button, it can just appear only when comments are linearly displayed, and all will be well.


      I want to start by saying that this is certainly an interesting idea, but I think it can be somewhat confusing and some kind of visual indicator might be nice.

      Let users set an integer for how many indented comments they want before transitioning to the linear solution (What if the max number of indents is too much for the user's screen? They set 20 indents on their desktop, but that clearly runs off screen on mobile. How do we handle that?)

      What we had was a purely "indented solution" and this change has introduced a hybrid "indented linear solution"

      My proposal:

      So, just from

      Let us, for just a moment, divide a topic's comments page into columns. We'll assume eight, though it could certainly be more or less in practice. On an ultrawidescreen monitor, with the webpage stretched as wide as it will go, let us just say that the sidebar takes up the eighth and final column


      Allow the user to set the position of the comment column and how much space it will take up. For simplicity's sake, let's just assume that right now, the sidebar takes up the eighth and final column of the page (It's actually the seventh)

      Divide a topic's comment page into eight columns. The sidebar gets at least column number eight, the comment boxes as they are now would occupy columns three through six, but also give the users the option to set which columns, from one to seven, that they want the comment boxes to occupy, thus allowing a variable width.

      The sidebar currently occupies the seventh column. It could be pushed to the eighth. It could optionally be hidden entirely on the "desktop" view by default like it is on the "mobile" view. (Some users aren't going to like that suggestion)

      My reason for suggesting this is that I have a widescreen monitor. I can fit dozens of indented comments on screen without a problem, and while I like this "linear solution" you've implemented as a solution to a problem, I don't like having to deal with it when the problem doesn't exist for me.

      We know how wide the user's webpage window is, so we know how wide the comment boxes are, and we know how many pixels are used by the indentation.

      If each indent cost us five pixels, and we're three comments down the chain, we're losing fifteen pixels due to indentation. So, as each comment box gets smaller and smaller the further down it goes, we eventually get to a point where we can't even see the comments anymore.

      Personally, I think we should allow as many indents as possible depending on the user's browser's page width, up to a high maximum.

      So, just as probably not mathematically accurate example, if a user's browser's page width is 1,270 pixels wide, they only get ten indentation levels before the linear system (the system you implemented and announce with this topic) takes over.

      2 votes