Amarok's recent activity

  1. Comment on Tinnitus is making me crazy in ~health

    Amarok
    Link Parent
    That's what I had to do. I find the more I think about it, the louder and more likely to intrude it becomes. Forgetting tinnitus exists is exactly like playing the game. Sometimes I can go weeks...

    That's what I had to do. I find the more I think about it, the louder and more likely to intrude it becomes. Forgetting tinnitus exists is exactly like playing the game. Sometimes I can go weeks without noticing it, up until I see the word tinnitus anyway. It never goes away but if you avoid thinking about it or listening to it you can forget to notice it with some practice. White noise makes it easier to forget, gives it something else to get lost in. I always have a fan or music on even sleeping. If the white noise stops the tinnitus will wake me up out of a dead sleep in no time.

    2 votes
  2. Comment on Its still rough, but I made a really busy tildes theme in ~tildes

    Amarok
    (edited )
    Link
    On a big 4K monitor it's actually rather nice, makes better use of all that screen real estate. Edit: I realized there's another reason I like it this way. It's reminding me of books with the two...

    On a big 4K monitor it's actually rather nice, makes better use of all that screen real estate.

    Edit: I realized there's another reason I like it this way. It's reminding me of books with the two column layout. We're always scrolling up/down all the time, and it made me wonder what a site that decided to go the other way, right/left, might feel like. I like the idea of just swiping left/right to move from one Tildes page to the next on mobile, and just having them march back and forth the same way with a two column layout on desktop. Turn the infinite scroll into page turning.

    It'd give this place a very different 'feel' to other social media sites if it ran along the other axis, that's for sure. I don't even know if I'd like it that way but I would kinda like to try it out that way for a while just to explore the idea.

    4 votes
  3. Comment on Weekly coronavirus-related chat, questions, and minor updates - week of June 28 in ~health.coronavirus

    Amarok
    Link Parent
    I've seen Dr. John Campbell say the same thing - he's quite optimistic. The benefit of the second shot is to stimulate your immune system so it takes the threat more seriously. Kinda incredible...

    I've seen Dr. John Campbell say the same thing - he's quite optimistic. The benefit of the second shot is to stimulate your immune system so it takes the threat more seriously. Kinda incredible that our immune system works that way, but it does. The vaccine used to provoke the second response is less important than just having that second provocation.

    3 votes
  4. Comment on Who else here is trying to beat the heat? in ~life

    Amarok
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    This is the best part of living on a hillside in western ny. It's hot, sure, but it's wildly breezy too, almost all the time. I've got every window in the house open for the heat, and a small AC...

    This is the best part of living on a hillside in western ny. It's hot, sure, but it's wildly breezy too, almost all the time. I've got every window in the house open for the heat, and a small AC unit just for the bedroom so it's not too hot to sleep that I use if it's a muggy night. It's only in the 90'F range today, not too bad with the breeze. I take a cold shower if I'm feeling super-hot and it does wonders. I've got a medium size fan in the living room that can move a lot of air directly over me.

    I am not going to be doing any strenuous activity, though, and I've been taking it lighter than usual on the caffeine.

    3 votes
  5. Comment on WHO urges fully vaccinated people to continue to wear masks as delta Covid variant spreads in ~health.coronavirus

    Amarok
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    From everything I've watched and read on this (like, daily for a year) if you've had any of the covid strains, your immune system already knows how to fight the virus, having learned how to...

    From everything I've watched and read on this (like, daily for a year) if you've had any of the covid strains, your immune system already knows how to fight the virus, having learned how to recognize it and kill it. These mutations change a fraction of a percent of the genome, and you'd have to change a much greater amount of it for the immune system to get fooled. You will begin making antibodies instantly, rather than after a 3-5 day learning curve.

    If you've had it once, catching it the second time is likely to give you cold-like symptoms, the most common of which is a headache paired with sore throat or a stuffy nose - and for most people who have had it or been vaccinated, there will be no noticeable symptoms at all. It's more likely you'd catch it, then spread it to everyone you meet for about three days after, and never even know you'd had it again.

    All the data we have says this is a long term immunity, so your immune system is going to remember this for years, likely even decades.

    2 votes
  6. Comment on WHO urges fully vaccinated people to continue to wear masks as delta Covid variant spreads in ~health.coronavirus

    Amarok
    Link
    Lots of confusion about the delta variant. Let's have Dr. John clear that all up in five minutes. The short version: delta is 64% more transmissible than alpha, which itself was 40% more than the...

    Lots of confusion about the delta variant. Let's have Dr. John clear that all up in five minutes.

    The short version:

    • delta is 64% more transmissible than alpha, which itself was 40% more than the original
    • meaning delta is a bit over twice as contagious as the original covid strain from 2019
    • because delta infects with a much smaller inoculum (virus particles you inhale)
    • and produces a much higher viral load much faster once infected
    • so people with delta, even the vaccinated, shed more virus much faster
    • it does not appear to be better at killing people yet than other variants, need more data
    • pfizer and astrazeneca are both 36% effective after 1 dose, 88% after two vs delta
    • illness for the vaccinated is much more mild, 1-2 symptoms instead of 5+
    • if you've had two shots, you're not likely to end up in a hospital even with delta
    • best protection is achieved 2 weeks after the second dose is administered
    • outdoor transmission of delta is possible where it flatly was not for prior strains
    22 votes
  7. Comment on Not trying to make waves but why are articles posted to news that relate to lgbt moved? in ~tildes

    Amarok
    Link Parent
    Damn, that's an interesting observation. You may be on to something there.

    Damn, that's an interesting observation. You may be on to something there.

    3 votes
  8. Comment on What games have you been playing, and what's your opinion on them? in ~games

    Amarok
    Link
    I picked up Stellaris since it's on sale, and that's one damn expensive game if you include the mountains of DLC. I like 4x, hadn't played it before, and have heard many good things. I'm in love...

    I picked up Stellaris since it's on sale, and that's one damn expensive game if you include the mountains of DLC. I like 4x, hadn't played it before, and have heard many good things. I'm in love already. It's deeper than Endless Space 2. Once I've put it through its paces I'll share my thoughts.

    6 votes
  9. Comment on Meet the new server, functionally the same as the old server (hopefully) in ~tildes.official

    Amarok
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    My inner geek is curious what hardware improvements moving servers after three years gets for a project. Newer CPUs, sure, but what about the memory and disks?

    My inner geek is curious what hardware improvements moving servers after three years gets for a project. Newer CPUs, sure, but what about the memory and disks?

    7 votes
  10. Comment on What's something you wish made a comeback? in ~talk

    Amarok
    Link Parent
    I remember that website, and I still haven't seen any other music service match its heyday. I don't suppose we could convince you to share that playlist in ~music sometime. ;)

    I remember that website, and I still haven't seen any other music service match its heyday. I don't suppose we could convince you to share that playlist in ~music sometime. ;)

    2 votes
  11. Comment on Not trying to make waves but why are articles posted to news that relate to lgbt moved? in ~tildes

    Amarok
    Link Parent
    We were all a bit heated coming here after reddit. It takes a while for the angry-media hangover to wear off. <3

    We were all a bit heated coming here after reddit. It takes a while for the angry-media hangover to wear off. <3

    9 votes
  12. Comment on Not trying to make waves but why are articles posted to news that relate to lgbt moved? in ~tildes

    Amarok
    Link Parent
    It's fine. The idea here is that while a user makes a post, it's up to the community to manage it. Let the people who care about precision tagging or categorization handle the details the...

    It's fine. The idea here is that while a user makes a post, it's up to the community to manage it. Let the people who care about precision tagging or categorization handle the details the submitters miss or leave out - and move posts to where they belong instead of deleting them like reddit does. Who has access to these features will depend on their level of participation in the community - make everyone into a moderator, if it's a group where they spend a lot of time. Many hands make light work.

    If someone abuses their mod powers we can just turn access to them off again. So far that hasn't been a problem here, everyone's pretty friendly. :)

    11 votes
  13. Comment on Not trying to make waves but why are articles posted to news that relate to lgbt moved? in ~tildes

    Amarok
    Link
    I feel like the short answer is that Tildes hasn't got the chops to have a multi-homed post yet - the same post, visible in both communities, and possibly even with separate comment threads, one...

    I feel like the short answer is that Tildes hasn't got the chops to have a multi-homed post yet - the same post, visible in both communities, and possibly even with separate comment threads, one per community where it appears.

    Someone probably saw the 'lgbt' tag and just assumed it should be in that group rather than news. Many people here can edit titles, tags, links, and move posts (only Deimos can delete/lock). Those activities are recorded (for 30 days only, along with the person's name) in the 'topic log' that's over there in the sidebar. --->

    8 votes
  14. Comment on What did you do this weekend? in ~talk

    Amarok
    Link
    I took a trip alright. Story time. I mentioned I had a half-dose of magic mushrooms for the first time a couple months back. This time, however, I took 4 grams instead of 1.5 grams. I went a bit...

    I took a trip alright. Story time.

    I mentioned I had a half-dose of magic mushrooms for the first time a couple months back. This time, however, I took 4 grams instead of 1.5 grams. I went a bit high because I wanted to see what the deal was with the hallucinations, only got a little whiff of them last time and I liked it.

    I had a friend coming over who hadn't tripped on mushies before but wanted to try them. The plan was for him to pop by and we'd take the full dose and hang out for a day. He calls me up while he's on the road and tells me he ate them while he was driving, and I should eat mine before he gets here. (wtf!) So I wolf them down and wait for him to show up.

    The problem was, this friend had the weight loss surgery where they disconnect your stomach. His mushies went directly into his small intestine, so he just barely made it here before he had an aggressive liftoff. Neither one of us thought of that and I feel like I should have. They hit him like a train much faster than they did for me. The usual one hour onset was, for him, about twenty minutes. He was a bit panicked and had a rough first hour (including those annoying muscle/activity loops) but after that it was fine.

    I spent some time just chilling out in a clover patch in the backyard watching the clouds through the trees, and it was great. Just sitting on the deck and watching the lawn reveal its colors in the sunlight was incredible. It's a view I get every day and I feel like I only saw it for the first time on Friday. Normal vision/color is so washed out compared to that, it's like real life is black and white and you don't get to see the real colors of things until those shrooms are in your head. Now I know what solarpunk needs to look like, but film can never capture those colors. Reminded me a bit of cerenkov radiation in a nuclear reactor, same kind of eldritch glow, but on everything being hit by sunlight.

    I had some pretty spectacular visuals this time. I wonder if my aphantasia has some effect on how I process hallucinations. The world went into high-contrast mode and everything I looked at that should have been stationary was moving a bit, the 'breathing' effect you see people talk about. I did have some genuine not-there hallucinations, but it wasn't at all what I expected.

    I'd hallucinate for example that some small insect flew up near my face, try to focus on it, and it'd fly away. I was wearing a wide-brimmed hat to keep the real bugs away - for a few minutes there I was swatting at the non-real ones like an idiot. Audio hallucinations were just small things, like hearing a mosquito an inch from my ear that wasn't there. After the first couple times that happened I could easily tell the difference between real/fake. The not-there stuff looked rather like those 3D images you see in those hidden image posters. Semi-transparent, small, and likely to run away if you try hard to focus on them.

    There was something incredibly... strange about it. When you're tripping like that you really get a sense of how bad and narrow our interpretations of the world are through our senses. Watching my brain present me with a fiction through sight, and then taking time to really look at that those tiny fictions, catching them when they fade in or out of perception, was really interesting. I feel like I trust my senses just a bit less now, and that's a good thing.

    The trip lasted about six hours. I think the bad part of it, by far, is that the psilocybin has a tendency to place you into both thought and action loops. Worse still, anything you're doing right now that you're happy with will bore you to death within five minutes. It was utterly impossible to sit and chill on this stuff in front of a screen or while listening to music. Any attempts to do so would start that irritating introspective slide. Sleep is similarly impossible, it will not let you sleep, or even lie down long or sit still in a chair for more than a minute. The solution was simple, of course - get off my ass and move around.

    I feel like I have a greater appreciation for what my autistic grand-niece's perspective is like after this trip. For a little while, my ability to focus became very similar to hers. Was I really like that as a child? I certainly don't remember it at this age. It was very cool to experience that for a little while.

    We came down from the trip as the sun was setting, and set off a bunch of fireworks in the driveway (and yes, those are infinitely better if you have that shine in your vision). Not long after that the high abated, and we spent the evening playing Betrayal which is an awesome tabletop game.

    This stuff is so different from drugs like cannabis or alcohol. Taking mushies is like walking a tightrope, you need to manage your high and keep mentally on top of it for the entire trip - there's no taking it back or turning it off again. I am very glad I did a half-dose the first time to prepare for the full dose. I'd already learned how to deal with it over a much shorter time frame and less intense trip, so when I was on the full ride this time I was very confident and had no trouble managing it.

    That said, the other 30% of the experience is annoying as hell - rubbery limbs, muscles that twitch like your leg does when you are tired in the evenings, lack of focus... I can see why this drug gets on top of some people. Definitely not the sort of thing you want to do in public. Sign me up for a better version of this drug in the future - I like the mental effects, but the physical ones not so much. I wonder if it's possible to avoid them.

    The afterglow is still on right now a couple days later - I feel like a million bucks. It definitely kicks depression to the curb on a long timeframe, far longer than the actual trip lasts. I think I'll limit this drug to at most once a year. It's fun once in a while but the trips have that annoying component. There were times I was watching the clock. My friend enjoyed it once he got past the hard liftoff but he has the same opinion. Definitely clear your calendar for the entire day and have some not-high people around if you ever decide to try this stuff. Also, take it with some food, it slows the onset and softens it. I did it on an empty stomach and my guts were churning.

    9 votes
  15. Comment on Why some biologists and ecologists think social media is a risk to humanity in ~science

    Amarok
    Link
    The paper is right here. The article linked above also contains an interview with the authors. Abstract:

    The paper is right here. The article linked above also contains an interview with the authors.

    Abstract:

    Collective behavior provides a framework for understanding how the actions and properties of groups emerge from the way individuals generate and share information. In humans, information flows were initially shaped by natural selection yet are increasingly structured by emerging communication technologies. Our larger, more complex social networks now transfer high-fidelity information over vast distances at low cost. The digital age and the rise of social media have accelerated changes to our social systems, with poorly understood functional consequences. This gap in our knowledge represents a principal challenge to scientific progress, democracy, and actions to address global crises. We argue that the study of collective behavior must rise to a “crisis discipline” just as medicine, conservation, and climate science have, with a focus on providing actionable insight to policymakers and regulators for the stewardship of social systems.

    6 votes
  16. Comment on What's something you wish made a comeback? in ~talk

    Amarok
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    When I think of Nirvana, only one modern artist comes to mind: Bully Also from the comments on that video are some interesting finds... Drenge Wolf Alice Savages Colleen Green Courtney Barnett

    When I think of Nirvana, only one modern artist comes to mind: Bully

    Also from the comments on that video are some interesting finds...

    3 votes
  17. Comment on What's something you wish made a comeback? in ~talk

    Amarok
    Link Parent
    Send Quentin Tarantino a copy of this book (along with two appropriately themed decks of cards, a poker chip set, and several sets of nice bone dice) and I suspect it'll take care of itself. (context)

    Send Quentin Tarantino a copy of this book (along with two appropriately themed decks of cards, a poker chip set, and several sets of nice bone dice) and I suspect it'll take care of itself. (context)

    2 votes
  18. Comment on Preliminary Assessment: Unidentified Aerial Phenomena (PDF) in ~news

    Amarok
    Link Parent
    Yep. It's significant because signature management is not a natural phenomena and could only mean intelligence - indicating non-US aircraft or everyone's favorite little green men. I also found it...

    Yep. It's significant because signature management is not a natural phenomena and could only mean intelligence - indicating non-US aircraft or everyone's favorite little green men. I also found it interesting that some of these had RF signatures, which while not ruling out natural phenomena does make natural explanations less likely. If that is in fact some sort of natural phenomena making RF signatures, it's a phenomena we haven't bagged and tagged yet that may further our understanding of science. Either way we should pursue it.

    I'd be happy to see the funding go to the pentagon for better next-generation detectors, cameras, and radar systems. Eyes are important, and there's more to knowing what's out there than military radar systems. I wonder though if perhaps this isn't something we can actually crowdsource. Why not turn the UFO crazy into an actual hunt, with everyone in on it? This doesn't have to be a strictly pentagon-focused investigation.

    I can't imagine the drek that would rain down on a government run UAP tip line where everyone could submit evidence and reports. It'd likely be quite the slog combing through it all.