soks_n_sandals's recent activity

  1. Comment on What is your philosophy on photography? in ~arts

    soks_n_sandals
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    Howdy! I shoot on 35mm and 120. I learned from a handful of textbooks and technical prints, just out of fascination. Increasingly, we use Instax cameras! Hard to beat with friends for a snapshot....

    Howdy! I shoot on 35mm and 120. I learned from a handful of textbooks and technical prints, just out of fascination. Increasingly, we use Instax cameras! Hard to beat with friends for a snapshot. I've never had the opportunity to print in the darkroom, sadly.

    I've done some fine art printing with a really high-end printer, which is sort of the digital version of the same process. That printer was actually a crazy happenstance. I was working on a project with my partner at the time, and we found this super nice Epson 13"-wide printer in a thrift store in the most random small town. We were shooting 120 B&W portraits and landscapes and need to make prints for a show. But, we couldn't really afford to make as many gallery-quality prints as we wanted, until we saw this printer. It worked perfectly, and it's still sort of unbelievable.

    That's part of the reason why I put "print" in quotes. Sometimes a print is a photo for a friend to share digitally, and sometimes it'll actually be on paper.

    What got you to transition to shooting on film?

    2 votes
  2. Comment on What is your philosophy on photography? in ~arts

    soks_n_sandals
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    My personal philosophy is that photography is fundamentally an art form, unless the image being considered is a "snapshot". The snapshot has some of the characteristics of a photograph, but is...

    My personal philosophy is that photography is fundamentally an art form, unless the image being considered is a "snapshot". The snapshot has some of the characteristics of a photograph, but is ultimately less thought out and more spur-of-the-moment.

    The photographer has a litany of tools available to warp the photograph as they see fit to convey some point. This is most well-exercised in black-and-white, and particularly film. As a photographer, my ultimate goal is to capture an excellent negative/initial image with some eventual "print" in my mind's eye. Thus, the process is holistic, beginning with how I intend to capture the negative and what I want the eventual print to look like. Making technical selections is a byproduct of the artistic process, though the technical selections are my favorite part. In this way, I look to the great photographers specifically for inspiration. As an example, consider photographing a tree with significant areas of dark along the ground and light higher on the trunk. There's a technique to pre-expose the dark areas on the ground, then follow up with a complete exposure of the scene. This pushes up the dark areas without blowing out the light areas. Another example is using filters to turn a bright sky black (on B&W film). Or, using density filters to remove moving subjects from a busy area via long exposure. Sure, all of these photos have been done before. But it's no different than learning painting by making a copy of a masterwork. You'll learn something if you apply yourself seriously.

    Ultimately, I don't see making a photograph as a way to help me see the world, but rather as a way to help you see what I see in the world. Or, perhaps I want to show you how a subject could be seen. It's precisely in this way that I think photography is best appreciated as an art form. In the same way that one may interpret the colors, framing, scale, detail, or technique in a painting, we can so interpret a photograph.

    3 votes
  3. Comment on How a Phoenix record store owner set the audiophile world on fire in ~music

    soks_n_sandals
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    Absolutely - if anything they've done the music community a service by digitizing the original master tapes. It's a really great thing, I think. But it all depends on one's perspective.

    Absolutely - if anything they've done the music community a service by digitizing the original master tapes. It's a really great thing, I think. But it all depends on one's perspective.

    9 votes
  4. Comment on How a Phoenix record store owner set the audiophile world on fire in ~music

    soks_n_sandals
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    The amount of snake oil in audiophile marketing and reviews still astounds me. I hesitate to call myself an audiophile since I want to place distance between myself and those who think expensive...

    The amount of snake oil in audiophile marketing and reviews still astounds me. I hesitate to call myself an audiophile since I want to place distance between myself and those who think expensive cables sound better. This is a story that I found very interesting, since it's caused quite a stir. Short summary below.

    A group (MoFi) revered for dutiful and meticulous vinyl pressings from original master tapes is under fire for being less-than-transparent about the use of digital sources in their process. Reviewers hailed their vinyl releases for being "all analog-to-analog", but the reality is that some of their releases involved capturing an extremely high resolution digital copy (4x DSD, 256 times higher resolution than CD) from the master tape first. Reading analog tape degrades the tape, so getting a high resolution digital file makes plenty of sense to avoid damaging the source. Mofi never really corrected anyone on this slight technicality. For those reviewers that claimed to have "golden ears" and the ability to hear digital in an audio chain, the sun has set on these claims. Clearly, they could NOT tell the difference and have been revealed to the world as liars and fools. Naturally, the audio community has denounced MoFi. This is fascinating, since the physical records haven't changed and if they sounded good a month ago, they should certainly still sound good right?

    Some are treating this as a massive scandal. I think it's only scandalous for those who espoused the superiority of all-analog transfers to vinyl. In a way, I think this is a good thing. It is a landmark event where we can point to the titans of review and industry bullshit and say "you were wrong" and hopefully de-stigmatize digital sources for newcomers than can't spend $50k on a stereo with analog source components. So in a way, I'm quite empathetic to the backlash MoFi has received. The bottom line is the technicians that recorded digital files from the original masters took painstaking efforts to deliver a premium product. That hasn't changed.

    23 votes
  5. Comment on Linus Torvalds is using an Apple Silicon Macbook running Asahi Linux in ~tech

    soks_n_sandals
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    This is a very fascinating historical context. I find it strange that Apple has a "chaotic" desktop environment without gridding or robust windows snapping for MacOS, but iOS/iPadOS are the...

    This is a very fascinating historical context. I find it strange that Apple has a "chaotic" desktop environment without gridding or robust windows snapping for MacOS, but iOS/iPadOS are the opposite design language. Both are locked down with no real customization for where icons go. Everything backfills a grid. Whereas Android is much more MacOS-like in its flexibility for icon placement. Still gridded, but no backfill.

    Hence, I think iOS has always had it wrong. The user should be able to place icons wherever they want to suit their hands and usage. While I don't personally love the MacOS computing paradigm, I at least understand its intentions. Steering away from a "spatial" system on iOS makes me wonder if there's an underlying acknowledgement that it was time to depart from that line of thinking. But if so, why? Why do it with iOS? It makes more sense on a phone where you're touching the screen and file paths are truly hidden. Why abandon the thing that people love about MacOS?

    2 votes
  6. Comment on Should 18-year-olds be able to buy semiautomatic rifles? In Georgia, two young men who want to be the ‘good guys with guns’ try to decide. in ~life

    soks_n_sandals
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    Sharing this because I think it's an interesting look into the reasoning and outlook of two young men in the South regarding firearms. I find this to be a crucial part of the article: It can be...

    Sharing this because I think it's an interesting look into the reasoning and outlook of two young men in the South regarding firearms.

    I find this to be a crucial part of the article:

    [Evan] started watching Tucker Carlson, trying to make sense of a confusing world. He discovered an app called iFunny, which is Russian-owned and has been used as a recruiting tool for extremist groups, and which Evan described as full of disturbing videos, soft porn and people who are “Biden haters, Trump haters, authoritarians, left wing, right wing, sideways wing, nothing-wing.” He found videos that convinced him the 2020 election was stolen. He found what he described as “a lot of enthusiastic people in the community of the right wing, talking about ‘Man, I can’t wait for this revolution to happen,’ ” and found himself wondering what that was about.

    He also learned about a subculture of hypermasculinity in which men tried to be “Alphas” and “Sigmas” and “Giga Chads,” which Evan said was partly a joke — “Like, a Giga Chad wakes up and shaves with a hunting knife, waterboards himself, does 5,000 push-ups and is ready for the day at 2 a.m.,” he said — and partly serious.

    It can be extremely difficult as an impressionable young man to see this kind of material and parse out your own ideas about masculinity vs. the caricatures being presented. I remember being on Tumblr a decade ago and being influenced by the anti-SJW bullshit con-artists. I got out of that environment, stopped consuming that media, and took a different path. I think I'm fortunate to have been surrounded with folks that helped me see through those ideas, as opposed to getting entrenched in backing something I didn't really understand.

    On one hand, I'm taken pleasantly surprised by the self-awareness of Evan (the 18-year-old profiled) and that maturity it takes to do the self reflection he's doing. On the other, I can't help but see him as young and focused on the wrong aspects of toughness and masculinity.

    He says the following on getting his first handgun:

    “I felt like a kid who got a new PlayStation,” he said. “I had it with me the whole day in the house. When I went upstairs to play games, I had it on the bedside table with me. When I was in the kitchen making a bowl of cereal, I had it in my pocket with me. The barrel was kind of digging into my hipbone. I felt tougher. I know that’s the adolescent answer, but I felt tougher.”

    It's encouraging that Evan has an older family member serving as a sort of mentor, and is not afraid to reinforce safe gun-handling:

    “I’m sorry,” Skylar said sharply. “I don’t mean to cut you off, but you know what you haven’t done with that thing?”

    Evan shrugged.

    “Take it out, take it out,” Skylar said, becoming irritated.

    “This?” Evan said, pulling the pistol out of his waistband.

    “Yeah — what have you not done yet?” Skylar said.

    “What are you talking about?” Evan said.

    “Have you cleared it?” Skylar said. “I ain’t seen you clear it once.”

    “I cleared it this morning,” Evan said.

    “I’m talking about every time you take it out,” Skylar said.

    “Oh,” Evan said.

    “Do it. Every. Time,” Skylar said, motioning for the gun.

    “Here’s what I was talking about — one, you handed it to me like this,” Skylar said, demonstrating that Evan had the gun pointed at a wall instead of down at the floor.

    “Do it like this,” Skylar said, pointing it down.

    He pulled back the slide to expose the chamber where a live round could be.

    “Look in there,” he said.

    Evan looked.

    “No, look all the way down,” Skylar said.

    Evan looked all the way. It was clear.

    “It don’t have one,” Skylar said. “But all it takes is one mistake, buddy, then someone’s hurt.”

    He handed the gun back to Evan.

    And Skylar's right about this. I grew up hearing the phrase "stupid hurts" more times than I can count. My father was dead-serious when he taught me to shoot, and was as stern in reinforcing these principles as he could be. And so for a long time I wanted to own a handgun. I bought into the rhetoric and culture of having a gun to protect oneself or one's home. And then, the less media I saw about it, the less interested I became. Now, I live somewhere that getting a handgun registered is such a monumental pain in the ass, I haven't thought about it again.

    January 6th did reignite some of that interest, but again, after consuming less of the media that stokes these fears, it's out of mind.


    My point in posting this and writing out these thoughts is to say that we should allow space for young people to wrestle with these conversations, so long as there's ample challenge to the ideas being presented. And, to draw attention to the need for positive mentorship and the precipitous place radical online messaging can lead people. There always needs to be an anchor to the real world.

    9 votes
  7. Comment on Is the US going to break up? in ~talk

    soks_n_sandals
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    This is a valid question, but I think the answer comes off as either dismissive or alarmist. I think we could avoid a fissure of the US if the government does something to reign in the current...

    This is a valid question, but I think the answer comes off as either dismissive or alarmist.

    I think we could avoid a fissure of the US if the government does something to reign in the current gutting of longstanding precedent that's happening. Putting aside where you (or anyone else) stands on these issues, most of the recent SCOTUS rulings are a spiderweb of bullshit hiding an agenda. Take yesterday's ruling that the EPA can't effectively regulate carbon emissions. By diminishing the EPA's power and authority, we potentially barrel to a pre-Clean Air/Water Act US. That's not a place I want to live. Maybe the Justices in their old age have forgotten when rivers caught fire and Pittsburgh's buildings were under a layer of black soot. How about the BP oil spill? I haven't forgotten about the damage that did to the Gulf Coast.

    But the EPA ruling is a small one compared to the potential affects of the overturning of Roe. Look at the sort of legislation potentially in the pipeline that would ban citizens of one state from (travel.ing to another state where abortion is legal)[https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2022/06/29/abortion-state-lines/]. Imagine individual states that try to impose their laws over other states and citizens of other states. That sounds like a Federal government. Either way, it's a massive overreach and is deeply insidious.

    So, unless the government tames these things right now, we will absolutely see it get worse. We will probably see it get worse anyway.

    If the government continues to do nothing, and states begin passing/enforcing increasingly restrictive laws, and impose those laws on citizens outside their state, AND we have vigilante groups like the Proud Boys enforcing the sentiment of these policies, then we're barrelling toward a violent eruption. My perspective here is rooted in my experience growing up in the South. People there are ready for a civil war. The semi-ironic thing is they are likely the ones who start it. What's worrying to me is the increasing calls for violence in traditionally liberal spaces online that gain traction. When both sides are calling for violence, what's the answer? Should there be two separate United States? Maybe - the South has been resisting the Feds since the Civil War. I like to think that the South isn't a lost cause, and I don't want to leave behind those who would be trapped beneath a draconian, theological government without the means to escape. But the truth is that the South consistently ranks last in observed metrics, and it's increasingly hard to justify propping those states up. The moral argument is aforementioned - we have a duty to the people who don't agree with the laws and can't leave.

    The US has been through tense and awful histories (McCarthy-ism and the red scare, Civil Rights movement, the Vietnam War) and has made it through. One must remain optimistic that we make it through this, though ignoring the potential for violence is naive.

    9 votes
  8. Comment on Controversy continues over whether hot water freezes faster than cold in ~science

    soks_n_sandals
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    I have a love-hate relationship with brain-tickling physics problems like this. I've seen them on the Veritasium Youtube channel, and they take a predictable path: state a problem that's...

    I have a love-hate relationship with brain-tickling physics problems like this. I've seen them on the Veritasium Youtube channel, and they take a predictable path: state a problem that's counterintuitive, let the community fight about it, then come back with a crucial nugget that makes the problem statement clearer. We don't really have the nugget for this one.

    I'm not an expert in material science or kinetics, though I have some background in it. This problem feels like something similar the Veritasium videos (infinitely long wires, can a car with a propeller go faster than the wind). At face value, it seems easy. Can a cup of hot water freeze faster than cold water? Well, no, if you interpret that to mean "If system A has more energy than system B and both are placed in a cold environment that removes energy at roughly the same rate, which will reach equilibrium with the cold environment?" So if you have to remove twice as much energy from system A, it should take ~twice as long (and there are a lot of assumptions made by the observer about each system if that's the answer). At it's most basic level, freezing is removing enough energy to reach a phase change. How you reach that phase change is now the difficult topic, as discussed in the article.

    And so I have to wonder if there would be less controversy with a statement like this, "Is there a kinetic pathway that allows system A to reach equilibrium faster than system B, if the state of system A is farther from equilibrium than system B is."

    And I think that comes down entirely to experimental setup. I thought the notion that frost forming on a cold cup of water could be melted by the hot cup of water was interesting. And there are lots of questions that arise regarding the experimental method.

    • How would these two cups freeze if they were insulated vessels? Does the hot vessel reject enough energy to the freezer space that it becomes harder for the cold vessel to reject heat at the same rate?
      • So should separate freezers be used?
    • Does the hot water undergo more natural convection when placed into the freezer, and thereby more mixing, and experience a more uniform freezing rate (if so, could this be solved by insulated vessels)?
    • How does the size scale affect the freezing? That is, if we use a huge freezer with a tiny cup, versus a large cup in a small freezer.
      • Does the vessel shape matter when doing this experiment? Different shapes will affect heat transfer, but does it matter?
      • Is the cup suspended in the freezer or is it placed against one of the freezer's cold walls?

    Anyway, you can see that just the experimental setup yields questions that could have fascinating answers. I'm sure many of these have been answered already. But at its core, the question posed makes it difficult to answer in a way that gives a satisfactory thermodynamic explanation.

    I'll leave it here with this quote:

    Science continues to spring from his insistence about the effect that bears [Mpemba's] name. Osborne, discussing the results of their investigations together, took a lesson from the initial skepticism and dismissal that the schoolboy’s counterintuitive claim had faced: “It points to the danger of an authoritarian physics.”

    3 votes
  9. Comment on The Grug Brained Developer: A layman's guide to thinking like the self-aware smol brained in ~comp

    soks_n_sandals
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    He actually did get promoted about a year back… everyone was stunned at the decision and voiced their concerns to the higher ups. If he gets promoted another level I will seriously consider a...

    He actually did get promoted about a year back… everyone was stunned at the decision and voiced their concerns to the higher ups. If he gets promoted another level I will seriously consider a switching jobs to a different organization.

    3 votes
  10. Comment on The Grug Brained Developer: A layman's guide to thinking like the self-aware smol brained in ~comp

    soks_n_sandals
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    God bless this post. I am test shaman. But also have to be grug. "Make something idiot proof and I'll find you a better idiot," is my motto. Mostly because of this, both in implementation and...

    God bless this post. I am test shaman. But also have to be grug. "Make something idiot proof and I'll find you a better idiot," is my motto. Mostly because of this,

    complexity very, very bad

    both in implementation and end-user experience. It also makes it really hard to test. And that sometimes means that it's really hard to use, too.

    sad but true: learn "yes" then learn blame other grugs when fail, ideal career advice

    My least favorite manager is like this. Your success is his glory, and your failure is your incompetence. I much prefer this, instead of having to explain to him and his higher-ups why something doesn't work.

    very important senior grug say "this too complicated and confuse to me"

    Complexity just leads to a constant friction when hunting bugs. I didn't write the code. I didn't break the code. I found it broken and reported it. If I miss a bug, it's also somehow my fault?

    7 votes
  11. Comment on Having been on Android for over a decade, I just got my first iPhone! What should I know? in ~tech

    soks_n_sandals
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    FaceID for passwords and app access works really well. I always fought my fingerprint reader on my last android. The sleep settings for do not disturb are also great. The notification granularity...

    FaceID for passwords and app access works really well. I always fought my fingerprint reader on my last android.

    The sleep settings for do not disturb are also great.

    The notification granularity is a blessing and a curse, but you can adjust notifications for the lock screen, app icons on the home screen for a given app.

    Apple Maps (in the US) is hilariously more useful than Google Maps for navigation. I never thought I'd see the day, but it's like Google wants to lose marketshare here.

    There's a lot of power in the automation through Shortcuts. I'm not an expert on them but there are cool examples online.

    I never set up my Google wallet, but I did setup my apple wallet and use it for concert tickets and airline travel and it's been flawless.

    There are definitely things I miss about the android OS that the iPhone just doesn't have or can't do, but the tradeoffs are more or less even. Good luck!

    4 votes
  12. Comment on A trip to Gee’s Bend, Alabama, where masterpieces hang from clotheslines in ~life

    soks_n_sandals
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    Lovey film. Thank you for sharing!

    Lovey film. Thank you for sharing!

    2 votes
  13. Comment on What have you been listening to this week? in ~music

    soks_n_sandals
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    I was able to find some of his stuff from Twitter in 2014 and yikes man. This is really the only music of his I listen to, so not a big loss to put it out of the rotation.

    I was able to find some of his stuff from Twitter in 2014 and yikes man. This is really the only music of his I listen to, so not a big loss to put it out of the rotation.

    2 votes
  14. Comment on What have you been listening to this week? in ~music

    soks_n_sandals
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    I posted over in another thread that I've been posting albums on my IG every day, so I'll put the text of those posts here too! Last of the Better Days Ahead by Charlie Parr I discovered this...

    I posted over in another thread that I've been posting albums on my IG every day, so I'll put the text of those posts here too!

    Last of the Better Days Ahead by Charlie Parr I discovered this record while listening through the mastering credits for Huntley Miller, and it stood out to me. I’m obsessed in the storytelling during the eight minute song Everyday Opus. I appreciate the simplicity of the recordings, and I think they fully embody American folk music.

    Out via Smithsonian Folkway Recordings. For live performances, checkout WesternAF on YouTube.

    Italian Ice by Nicole Atkins Italian Ice by Nicole Atkins, recorded in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, embodies the legacy of the name but isn't stuffy, nor is it derivative. Nicole Atkins was one of my pandemic finds. I couldn't get the groovy, restrained tracks like AM Gold and Domino out of my head. I also appreciated the whimsical nature of Never Going Home Again, essentially as a backstop for the more sentimental ballads like Forever and Captain. Atkins' voice is strong, with an occasional raspy breakup, and full of personality. Her dynamic contrast creates a sense of small-club intimacy, and is often immediately followed by soaring vocals fit for the largest hall. Overall, this record has an great track order and extremely cohesive production, but feels organic and timely. Put out by Singlelock Records.
    CeeLo Green is Thomas Callaway This record, CeeLo Green is Thomas Callaway, brought a joy to the first pandemic summer that's hard to describe. My mental image of Green was based on popular radio songs, and I'd never explored his catalog much before I saw the partnership between himself and Dan Auerbach at Easy Eye Sound. As the story goes, CeeLo Green wrote most of this assuming it was for someone else. Auerbach convinced Green to use the songs for his own recordings, and they cut the record in two days.

    The album opens with a slow ballad and all the hallmarks of a vintage soul sound. Green is delicate and subdued here to start before the sound opens up with background vocals and an increase in dynamics, leading to an energetic and earnest prechorus and chorus. The brightness continues in Lead Me, and we find a soulful groove on Little Mama. I really like the syncopated and stoccato delivery in the verses here. Don't Lie is a straightforward and enjoyable ballad before we get into an unexpected waltz with I Wonder How Love Feels, but CeeLo never fails to find the energy and delivers a symphonic chorus.

    People Watching, nestled in the middle of the album (maybe to start side B?), is one of my favorites. At a time where there was no people watching to do and I was living in a tiny town in PA, I was picturing string lights on a porch and rocking in a chair on a warm southern night.

    We return to a dreamy ballad in You Gotta Do It All, and feels so timeless it could almost be remastered from the vaults.

    Doing It All Together injects some southern rock, which is a welcome change. Another song that was particularly uplifting.

    Down With The Sun is a song that I love for it's distinct Easy Eye character.

    Thinking Out Loud showcases CeeLo's familiar falsetto in a beautifully arranged slow jam, and is the total antithesis to The Way, which closes the album on a darker, empowered tone.

    Overall, this record is a showcase of CeeLo Green's range as a vocalist and songwriter. It's a modern record with a vintage flair that provides us with an unrestrained brilliance.

    grae by Moses Sumney I first heard Moses Sumney featured on the song “Show Me Love” (Skrillex Remix) ft. Chance The Rapper, Moses Sumney, Robin Hannibal. From there, I was reintroduced to his work during a brief period where I was *very* interested in sound synthesis and watched recorded performances at the Moog Sound Lab.

    This album, grae, was another pandemic find. grae is beautifully intimate, artistic, and cohesive. In fact, despite the wide range of genres and production credits, grae triumphs as a concept album dedicated to Sumney's exploration of self, identity, and the struggles, revelations that accompany self-discovery.

    The music on grae is generally lush, enveloping, and ethereal. It is occasionally jazzy, sometimes pop-y, and overall deeply engaging. Sumney has an intense falsetto that is not spared, which amplifies his delivery of personal, introspective, and poetic lyrics.

    A particular production choice that I find fascinating is the sound design of the spoken interludes. MY wife and I visited a Smithsonian exhibit called Futures that showcased research into the perception of gender based on voice. Primarily based on pitch, the interactive exhibit allowed one to pitch a voice up and down, and ultimately find a voice that sounded neutral. Some of that same pitch shifting occurs on grae, and is a delightful interplay challenging how we perceive others and what those perceptions imply.

    Fleet Foxes - Fleet Foxes I've listened to this record by Fleet Foxes more times than I can count. As a folk record, it's a masterclass in songwriting and harmony. To me, it reads more like a symphonic piece with movements and motifs than it does an indie album. As a listener, it's sometimes difficult to tell where one song starts and another stops. Everything on this record is seamless, and it makes for a splendid listen from front to back.

    I've listened to a significant amount of folk lately. Four things have catalyzed my shift in taste: amazing record labels like Singlelock and Easy Eye, learning guitar, friends who want to sing and play guitar together, and the artists featured by WesternAF (The Lostines, Nick Shoulders, Willie Carlisle, the list goes on...) in what are basically modern-day field recordings. Which is about as pure folk Americana as you can get. But Fleet Foxes self-titled album laid the foundation, perhaps a decade ago, for me to appreciate folk music as I do now.

    I like this as an album for Fall or at daybreak, but it can be appreciated anytime.

    Hundred Acres - S. Carey I only recently found S. Carey's album Hundred Acres. This is another record mastered by Huntley Miller, (see: Siv Jakobson)

    S. Carey is Sean Carey, the percussionist, pianist, and backup vocalist for Bon Iver. Naturally, Hundred Acres is in the same sonic realm as the music of Bon Iver, but different in some crucial ways.

    Hundred Acres opens with Rose Petals. An arrangement of guitars gives the song a heartbeat and sound that's especially cavernous during the choruses. Carey's vocals are extremely intimate and trade focus with the guitars throughout the song. Somehow, everything seems important and unimportant all at the same time. It's melancholic, isolated, and feels almost desperate. Carey does an excellent job of layering textures to build complexity and excitement while remaining subdued and soft overall.

    Hideout also features prominent guitars, but uses an energetic finger-picking. I particularly enjoy Carey's harmonies in the choruses and the inclusion of strings and metallic percussion in the bridge between the last two choruses.

    I want to highlight the contrast in drum recording/style between True North and Emery. The snare drum in True North almost sucks the air out of the room. It's spacious and deep. Again, an interesting instance of contrasting space: the guitar and vocals sound like you're in Carey's bedroom, and the drums sound like an empty concert hall. Cut to the drums on Emery, which are degraded and trashy, and eventually swapped for crushed samples, then presented together.

    Admittedly, the title track Hundred Acres and More I See begin to lose me as they're less in line with the opening songs. I am brought back by Fool's Gold, mainly for its easy-listening sound. There's a small amount of lap steel guitar sound that leaves me wanting so much more harmony highlighted with the instrument.

    The last two songs give us more of the same sound, and don't engage me much more.

    The soundscape S. Carey achieves in Hundred Acres is rich and artistic, though I find the beginning of the album is stronger than the middle. The ending track, Meadow Song, does provide a strong sense of grounding and finality, in much the same way that Rose Petals sets the tone at the start. Overall, this is a lovely recording and treats us to a pleasant, dreamy vibe.

    1 vote
  15. Comment on What creative projects have you been working on? in ~creative

    soks_n_sandals
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    For sure! My IG is the same as my tildes username.

    For sure! My IG is the same as my tildes username.

    3 votes
  16. Comment on What creative projects have you been working on? in ~creative

    soks_n_sandals
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    Definitely! Do you mean the posts themselves or my IG handle?

    Definitely! Do you mean the posts themselves or my IG handle?

    3 votes
  17. Comment on What creative projects have you been working on? in ~creative

    soks_n_sandals
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    I've started posting an album on my Instagram with a write-up about the album every day. I have few followers, so it's really just a personal project that's giving me space to talk about music I...

    I've started posting an album on my Instagram with a write-up about the album every day. I have few followers, so it's really just a personal project that's giving me space to talk about music I like. I'm going to try to post one album per day for 365 days, at least when I'm not in the woods. So far, it's been just shy of two weeks and going well!

    Turns out that 365 albums is a lot of music.

    4 votes
  18. Comment on The reinvention of a ‘real man’: In cowboy country, a father and husband troubled by suicide reimagines American masculinity, one conversation at a time in ~health

    soks_n_sandals
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    This article addresses men's mental health in a way that really touched me. I've thought a lot about masculinity in the last few years, and it was challenging at the start, but has made me much...

    This article addresses men's mental health in a way that really touched me. I've thought a lot about masculinity in the last few years, and it was challenging at the start, but has made me much more secure and healthy as a person.

    Just some thoughts about a point in the article. Not hidden for anything sensitive, just hiding it for those that don't care. I get frustrated every time I see someone say online they won't/don't talk to their father, brother, uncle, friend, etc. over political beliefs. I think it's crucial that men provide a space for other men in their lives to be vulnerable, especially when other men are more conservative. We should be especially open to exploring masculinity with conservative men, since toxic masculinity harms them too, but they may just not see it! Otherwise, what? They're going to find support in more deeply radical spaces that support the us vs. them narrative.
    7 votes