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    1. Announcing a new Wikimedia project: Abstract Wikipedia

      Link to the announcement: https://lists.wikimedia.org/pipermail/wikimediaannounce-l/2020-July/001618.html I have copied the content of the announcement below, since on Tildes it becomes a bit more...

      Link to the announcement: https://lists.wikimedia.org/pipermail/wikimediaannounce-l/2020-July/001618.html

      I have copied the content of the announcement below, since on Tildes it becomes a bit more readable:

      (A translatable version of this announcement can be found on Meta [1])

      Hi all,

      It is my honor to introduce Abstract Wikipedia [1], a new project that has
      been unanimously approved by the Wikimedia Foundation Board of Trustees.
      Abstract Wikipedia proposes a new way to generate baseline encyclopedic
      content in a multilingual fashion, allowing more contributors and more
      readers to share more knowledge in more languages. It is an approach that
      aims to make cross-lingual cooperation easier on our projects, increase the
      sustainability of our movement through expanding access to participation,
      improve the user experience for readers of all languages, and innovate in
      free knowledge by connecting some of the strengths of our movement to
      create something new.

      This is our first new project in over seven years. Abstract Wikipedia was
      submitted as a project proposal by Denny Vrandečić in May of 2020 [2] after
      years of preparation and research, leading to a detailed plan and lively
      discussions in the Wikimedia communities. We know that the energy and the
      creativity of the community often runs up against language barriers, and
      information that is available in one language may not make it to other
      language Wikipedias. Abstract Wikipedia intends to look and feel like a
      Wikipedia, but build on the powerful, language-independent conceptual
      models of Wikidata, with the goal of letting volunteers create and maintain
      Wikipedia articles across our polyglot Wikimedia world.

      The project will allow volunteers to assemble the fundamentals of an
      article using words and entities from Wikidata. Because Wikidata uses
      conceptual models that are meant to be universal across languages, it
      should be possible to use and extend these building blocks of knowledge to
      create models for articles that also have universal value. Using code,
      volunteers will be able to translate these abstract “articles” into their
      own languages. If successful, this could eventually allow everyone to read
      about any topic in Wikidata in their own language.

      As you can imagine, this work will require a lot of software development,
      and a lot of cooperation among Wikimedians. In order to make this effort
      possible, Denny will join the Foundation as a staff member in July and lead
      this initiative. You may know Denny as the creator of Wikidata, a long-time
      community member, a former staff member at Wikimedia Deutschland, and a
      former Trustee at the Wikimedia Foundation[3]. We are very excited that
      Denny will bring his skills and expertise to work on this project alongside
      the Foundation’s product, technology, and community liaison teams.

      It is important to acknowledge that this is an experimental project and
      that every Wikipedia community has different needs. This project may offer
      some communities great advantages. Other communities may engage less. Every
      language Wikipedia community will be free to choose and moderate whether or
      how they would use content from this project.

      We are excited that this new wiki-project has the possibility to advance
      knowledge equity through increased access to knowledge. It also invites us
      to consider and engage with critical questions about how and by whom
      knowledge is constructed. We look forward to working in cooperation with
      the communities to think through these important questions.

      There is much to do as we begin designing a plan for Abstract Wikipedia in
      close collaboration with our communities. I encourage you to get involved
      by going to the project page and joining the new mailing list[4]. We
      recognize that Abstract Wikipedia is ambitious, but we also recognize its
      potential. We invite you all to join us on a new, unexplored path.

      Yours,
      Katherine Maher

      Executive Director,
      Wikimedia Foundation

      [1] https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Special:MyLanguage/Abstract
      Wikipedia/June 2020 announcement
      [2] https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Special:MyLanguage/Abstract_Wikipedia
      [3] https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Denny
      [4] https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/abstract-wikipedia

      Link to the proposal: https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Abstract_Wikipedia

      Discussions on Hacker News and Lobsters:

      25 votes
    2. What browser do you use? How have you customized it?

      I was just wondering how people use their browsers, and get ideas from others in regards to sharing ideas to improve my browsing experience. What do I use? I use Firefox Nightly with the common...

      I was just wondering how people use their browsers, and get ideas from others in regards to sharing ideas to improve my browsing experience.

      What do I use?

      I use Firefox Nightly with the common browser extensions like ublock origin, privacy badger, https everywhere, and some interesting ones like Dark Reader, Vimium (Which provides vim keybinds in your browser) and ViolentMonkey (which I use for userscripts like 4chanX, OneeChan, and the KissAnime ad blocker).

      21 votes
    3. How should I host my images?

      Imgur has been my go-to solution for uploading and sharing images and screenshots for years now, but I have become aware of some issues with the site's design that make it a pain for other people...

      Imgur has been my go-to solution for uploading and sharing images and screenshots for years now, but I have become aware of some issues with the site's design that make it a pain for other people to use.

      For instance, it's almost impossible to directly link to an image on Imgur, and not an image's page on Imgur. The mobile website experience is also not very good.

      Imgur isn't just an image hosting solution either, it's also a social media site. The website seems to detract from the image sharing experience in order to promote its social media side.

      I have no interest in that. I just want a solution to host my images so that I can syndicate them elsewhere.

      It seems like, in true IndieWeb fashion, the best solution is to just host my images on my own website, and indeed that's what I will probably end up doing.

      However, I have a few questions I wanted to ask, starting with recommendations for other websites:

      Does any here have an Imgur alternative that they can recommend as a good image hosting and sharing solution?

      I checked out a few sites, like Pixelfed, but it seems more like a federated Instagram alternative. Annoyingly, I can't demo the site before creating an account, so I don't actually know what the experience is like.


      Assuming there are no recommended Imgur alternatives and I should just host my images on my own website, I would also like to know:

      • Should I be worried about "anonymizing" my images and messing with Exif data?
      • Can anyone recommend software for optimizing image sizes? (Linux friendly, command-line or otherwise scriptable utilities preferred.)
      • As a bonus, can anyone recommend software for optimizing GIF and video files for sharing online? (Same preferences as above.)
      27 votes
    4. Best way to subscribe to podcast back-catalogs?

      Every now and then I come across a limited-run podcast that wrapped up ages ago and I want to add it to my feed. I don't want to manually click through the old episodes one by one, I want to...

      Every now and then I come across a limited-run podcast that wrapped up ages ago and I want to add it to my feed. I don't want to manually click through the old episodes one by one, I want to subscribe to it as if it were being published in realtime. Are there any tools that can help me with this?

      I think what I'm looking for is some sort of app that republishes an existing RSS feed with a date offset based on whatever recent date you subscribe to it. Even better would be something that lets me specify my own custom drip rate so I can binge through large catalogs at my own pace.

      I've been thinking about coding something like this but I don't want to reinvent the wheel if an existing solution is already out there.

      10 votes
    5. Recommended RSS Feeds / Readers?

      Inspired by this post, I was wondering what RSS feeds you all subscribe to and how you read them. Here are mine: http://feeds.reuters.com/reuters/topNews...

      Inspired by this post, I was wondering what RSS feeds you all subscribe to and how you read them.

      Here are mine:
      http://feeds.reuters.com/reuters/topNews
      https://www.pbs.org/newshour/feeds/rss/headlines
      https://www.pbs.org/newshour/feeds/rss/world
      http://feeds.nature.com/nature/rss/current

      I'm just started using Newsboat, a CLI RSS reader, to read in a few feeds (Reuters was one of them :( ) and it's pretty refreshing to get a text-based newsfeed with no distraction. Though, the feeds I'm subscribed to only give me a brief blurb of the news...

      26 votes