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    1. Here's what members of Okuna had to say about moderation and bad actors

      The following is in response to a post that @Deimos made yesterday here. TL;DR - I am beta testing Okuna and wanted to know their thoughts on the problems being experienced by Facebook. Thus, you...

      The following is in response to a post that @Deimos made yesterday here.

      TL;DR - I am beta testing Okuna and wanted to know their thoughts on the problems being experienced by Facebook. Thus, you may want to visit the post referenced above first.

      Here's what I posted to the development team:

      Last year Casey Newton published an article entitled "The Trauma Floor - The secret lives of Facebook moderators in America" that can be read here:

      https://bit.ly/3aJFwVJ

      There is an accompanying video here:

      https://bit.ly/2RM80pk

      Today an article came out entitled "YouTube moderators are being required to sign a statement acknowledging the job could give them PTSD" and can be read here:

      https://bit.ly/2RncGmy

      Moving forward, how will Okuna ensure that nothing like this takes place?

      Here are the five responses that I received:

      Response #1

      It’s awful what they have put up with and how little they are being listened to or accommodated.

      The only way Okuna can control the kind of content it wants to have is by keeping it “invite only” for as long as possible - so far so good. It will eventually be a choice between $, mission and scalability: how about we cross that bridge when we get there and do our utmost to make this platform friendly, efficient and transparent in the meantime?

      Response #2

      I’m hopeful that we’re building a culture of “don’t be a dick”, and that said culture will rub off on new members.

      I think it is totally fair to require a certain amount of decency. Nothing wrong with having different opinions, and voicing them, but attacking another member is never OK.

      Likewise, I am for zero tolerance on fascism, racism, sexism, various phobia and general ass hattery.

      From what I have seen, this is already the direction in which we’re going.

      Response #3

      The Ban-Hammer.

      Response #4

      It occurs to me that there are probably staff spies from other platforms on Okuna already. @jff I’m with you. Invite-only only protects O for a short while. Human nature doesn’t change. If we think O is immune we’re fooling ourselves.

      Little things, like limit to number of nested replies, make ranting harder. Better behaviour can be partly engineered……

      Response #5

      Invite only doesn’t protect. Lots of us are on other platforms propagating Okuna there and offering invites. Including me. There always can be a rotten fruit amongst them who get invites that way. Beside that, there is a waiting list…

      15 votes
    2. Tech support request: recovering from hard crashes in Linux

      EDIT: Latest update This is something so rudimentary that I'm a little embarrassed to ask, but I've also tried looking around online to no avail. One of the hard parts about being a Linux newbie...

      EDIT: Latest update


      This is something so rudimentary that I'm a little embarrassed to ask, but I've also tried looking around online to no avail. One of the hard parts about being a Linux newbie is that the amount of support material out there seems to differ based on distro, DE, and also time, so posts from even a year or two ago can be outdated or inapplicable.

      Here's my situation: I'm a newbie Linux user running Pop!_OS 19.10 with the GNOME desktop environment. Occasionally, games I'm playing will hard crash and lock up my system completely, leaving a still image of the game frozen on the screen indefinitely. The system stays there, completely unresponsive to seemingly any inputs. It doesn't happen often, but when it does it's almost always when I'm running a Windows game through Steam's Proton layer. I suspect it also might have something to do with graphics drivers, as I'll at times notice an uptick in frequency after certain updates, though that might just be me finding a suspicious pattern where none exists.

      Anyway, what I don't know how to do is gracefully exit or recover from these crashes. No keyboard shortcut seems to work, and I end up having to hold the power button on my computer until it abruptly shuts off. This seems to be the "worse case scenario" for handling it, so if there is a better way I should go about this, I'd love to know about it.


      EDIT: I really want to thank everyone for their help so far. My initial question has been answered, and for posterity's sake I'd like to post the solution here, to anyone who is searching around for this same issue and ends up in this thread:

      • Use CTRL+ALT+F3/F4/F5/F6 keys to access a terminal, where you can try to kill any offending processes and reboot if needed.
      • If that fails, use ALT+SYSRQ+R-E-I-S-U-B.

      With that out of the way, I've added more information about the crashes specifically to the thread, primarily here, and some people are helping me out with diagnosing the issue. This thread is now less about the proper way to deal with the crash than it is about trying to identify the cause of the crash and prevent it in the first place.

      12 votes
    3. There is such a thing as too much technology

      Today I went to my favorite bakery/cafeteria/restaurant/grocery store (yeah it's one place, but not large enough to be considered a supermarket - IDK the correct terminology in English but you get...

      Today I went to my favorite bakery/cafeteria/restaurant/grocery store (yeah it's one place, but not large enough to be considered a supermarket - IDK the correct terminology in English but you get the gist). It's a nice place if a little pricey. About a month ago, they installed a gate. Next to the gate, there's a huge metal thing with a single red button. When you press the button, it tosses an electronic ticket (that stores every purchase you make in the system) and the gate lets you go through. These are not synchronous, sometimes the gate is unlocked a lot sooner than the ticket is tossed. So today, after I got into the store, an employee had to run towards me to give me my electronic ticket. Okay.

      I noticed that, despite the machine having only one very big button, lots of people still need to be instructed by the employee in order to enter, and he's constantly manually handing out the tickets. There is also a gate to leave that slows things down.

      In this last month, I went a lot less to this place. That's because, whenever passing by, I used to enter just to check things up, see if there was something new or appetizing. You know, impulse buys. The need to check myself in and out (even when I don't purchase anything) made me quit that habit. I think other people are the same. Besides, what's the good of automation if it requires a human being to make it work correctly? AFAIK, the analog system worked. And we're not in a dangerous part of town where one needs to worry about people putting products in their pockets.

      That's why I say: sometimes, there is such a thing as too much technology.

      23 votes