9 votes

Who would have thought an iPad cursor could be so much fun?

1 comment

  1. hungariantoast
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    I said it in the previous topic and I will say it again here: I love this design. Unfortunately, I can't justify buying an iPad. I only use my current tablet for a handful of things, and my next...

    I said it in the previous topic and I will say it again here:

    I love this design.

    Unfortunately, I can't justify buying an iPad. I only use my current tablet for a handful of things, and my next laptop is probably going to replace that tablet entirely. I simply don't have a workflow or use case where buying an iPad makes sense for me.

    But I really love this design.

    I hope the folks who work on desktop environments, like the teams behind GNOME and KDE, are paying attention, because this is amazing and I want something like this on Linux.


    Which is odd considering how much a trackpad abstracts. A trackpad or mouse moves a disembodied thing on a remote surface. It's unintuitive. In the ‘90s, while in high school, I taught a class with a friend called Internet 101. And we quickly realized the first thing we had to teach the students (often decades older than us) was how to use a mouse. Watching them struggle was a revelation.

    Actually, this paragraph mentions something very important. Learning how to use a computer peripheral effectively requires us to separate the physical interaction with the peripheral and the actions on the screen.

    That probably sounds like a silly thing to say when it comes to a trackpad, mouse, or even trackballs.

    Of course you watch the cursor on the screen, and not your flabby meat arms moving the mouse around. You would be ridiculous to do otherwise!

    But think about peripherals that aren't pointing devices, such as keyboards. How many people do you know who look at their keyboard, even just sometimes, when they type?

    If you want to get really good at typing, you need to stop looking at your keyboard. Even better, replace your keycaps, or buy a new keyboard with blank keycaps.

    Art you interested in digital art? If you are, I highly recommend becoming proficient with a graphics tablet, even if you already draw on your laptop screen or have a pen display.

    Why? Well, remember when you were learning to draw and someone gave you that invaluable advice "never draw lines slowly"?

    What's that? No one ever gave you that advice? Oh...

    Well, the reason you should try not to draw lines slowly, but instead draw them quickly and confidently, is that drawing smooth lines becomes more difficult the slower you move your hand. As you draw a line, and you're watching your hand, and you're seeing how the line develops as you move, you'll tend to make "course corrections" to keep the line on-target.

    These "course corrections" result in wobbly lines.

    Seriously, anyone who has ever taken an art class should have already heard a whole lecture about this. It's a very basic piece of drawing advice.

    So you want to draw lines quickly and confidently. You don't want to watch the line develop, you just want to move your hand from point A to point B, looking ahead at where you want to go (like riding a bicycle or motorcycle).

    Avoid hand-eye coordination, rely on your muscles.

    Graphics tablets are perfect for this. They force you to watch the artwork on the screen, not your hand on the tablet.

    Seriously, if you have never taken the time to get really good at using a graphics tablet, do so. You'll be a better artist by the end of it.

    Anyways, what were we talking about? Cursors?

    5 votes