32 votes

Old CSS, new CSS

Topic deleted by author

10 comments

  1. [2]
    ainar-g
    Link
    I just came to say that I love Eevee's writing style. It's exactly the kind of style I would use if I wrote blog posts and was a bit more brave. The f-bombs are placed exactly where they're...

    I just came to say that I love Eevee's writing style. It's exactly the kind of style I would use if I wrote blog posts and was a bit more brave. The f-bombs are placed exactly where they're needed, and the story flows very well.

    10 votes
    1. Deimos
      Link Parent
      Eevee has a lot of great writing about internet communities too. It's been quite a long time since they've posted anything on that topic, but this is still one of my favorite articles of all time:...

      Eevee has a lot of great writing about internet communities too. It's been quite a long time since they've posted anything on that topic, but this is still one of my favorite articles of all time: On a technicality

      5 votes
  2. DanBC
    Link
    No no, you'd open up paint and create an image, then type your text in paint on that, then if you remembered you'd convert it all to web safe colours and save as a gif.

    Note also the utterly unreadable red text on a textured background, one of the truest hallmarks of 90s web design. “Why not put that block of text on an easier-to-read background?” you might ask. You imbecile. How would I possibly do that? Only the <body> has a background attribute! I could use a table, but tables only support solid background colors, and that would look so boring!

    No no, you'd open up paint and create an image, then type your text in paint on that, then if you remembered you'd convert it all to web safe colours and save as a gif.

    6 votes
  3. [7]
    ffmike
    Link
    And yet, for all that the Web in those early days was a pile of duct-taped kludges and workarounds, it was a lot easier for mere mortals to just bang together a web site. Of course, actually...

    And yet, for all that the Web in those early days was a pile of duct-taped kludges and workarounds, it was a lot easier for mere mortals to just bang together a web site. Of course, actually publishing it for someone else to read was sort of tricky...

    5 votes
    1. [5]
      ainar-g
      Link Parent
      I mean, HTML is still here. Nothing is stopping anyone from “banging together” a website. If anything, HTML5 stuff like <video> and <audio> made it even easier to express yourself.

      I mean, HTML is still here. Nothing is stopping anyone from “banging together” a website. If anything, HTML5 stuff like <video> and <audio> made it even easier to express yourself.

      7 votes
      1. [4]
        leigh
        Link Parent
        This! I do a lot of React stuff at work, and so whenever I get the chance to build stuff with not much more than just what's built into the browser I absolutely love it. (I tend to still use...

        This! I do a lot of React stuff at work, and so whenever I get the chance to build stuff with not much more than just what's built into the browser I absolutely love it. (I tend to still use TypeScript and Bundler, because I like those tools, but I try to avoid shipping too much third party stuff over the wire.)

        It's such a joy to learn about the capabilities of the modern Web in the process, and it's so satisfying seeing something cool you've made and knowing that it's only a few kilobytes. Especially given that I started learning about the Web as a teen not long after Eevee did, in the IE6 era, and the capabilities built into browsers now are beyond our wildest dreams back then.

        5 votes
        1. [3]
          ThatFanficGuy
          Link Parent
          Why TypeScript and not JS?

          Why TypeScript and not JS?

          1. [2]
            emdash
            Link Parent
            Can't speak for @leigh, but generally, once you go Typescript, it's hard to go back to vanilla Javascript. Even just having some light interfaces defined for data exchange makes a huge difference...

            Can't speak for @leigh, but generally, once you go Typescript, it's hard to go back to vanilla Javascript. Even just having some light interfaces defined for data exchange makes a huge difference in the assurances you can get in terms of reducing runtime errors.

            3 votes
            1. leigh
              Link Parent
              The thing that really made TypeScript a must-have for me was working on a relatively large application using Redux. Redux has a lot of things in a lot of different files that have to match, and my...

              The thing that really made TypeScript a must-have for me was working on a relatively large application using Redux. Redux has a lot of things in a lot of different files that have to match, and my working memory isn't amazing. Being able to have my autocomplete tell me what properties my action creator function was expecting in its object literal arguments or whatever, and getting red squigglies in my editor when I get it wrong rather than runtime errors, made life with Redux so much easier.

              Obviously, that's the exact opposite of what I was talking about earlier in the thread, but it's still useful in vanilla JS projects, because I'm directly touching the browser APIs a lot more (and often ones I'm not familiar with), and TS ships with signatures for those which are handy for similar reasons.

              2 votes
    2. emdash
      Link Parent
      It's still just as easy as it ever used to be, it's just the level of distraction and bar for 'quality' (and I use that term loosely) has been significantly raised. There's now an inordinate...

      It's still just as easy as it ever used to be, it's just the level of distraction and bar for 'quality' (and I use that term loosely) has been significantly raised. There's now an inordinate number of ways to produce and publish web content (hosted sites, GUI site builders, static site generators, build your own SPA, choose a JS framework, host with nginx or use a dynamic web server framework, etc) that the level of noise has increased significantly. Filtering that down to something coherent that expresses the vision you have for your own web content is now the primary challenge.

      4 votes