6 votes

The Harry Potter fallacy

3 comments

  1. vegai
    (edited )
    Link
    Then again I've had discussions where every second argument of my opponent was some version of "if anyone thinks that, they're pretty stupid". edit ... which I guess is like a reverse ad hominem?

    Then again I've had discussions where every second argument of my opponent was some version of "if anyone thinks that, they're pretty stupid".

    edit ... which I guess is like a reverse ad hominem?

    3 votes
  2. lou
    Link
    Archived.

    The “discursive hygiene” picture of fallacy theory sees fallacies as mistakes that a good arguer will avoid. Indeed, armed with a new toolbox of Latin names for fallacies, eager students all too often delight in spotting fallacies in the wild, shouting out their Latin names (ad hominem!; secundum quid!) as if they were magic spells. This is what Scott Aikin and John Casey, in their delightful book Straw Man Arguments, call the Harry Potter fallacy: the “troublesome practice of invoking fallacy names in place of substantive discussion”.

    Archived.

    2 votes