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How Rome destroyed its own republic

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  1. Loire
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    This is a fairly good article, and a topic I have been feeding to my American friends since the insurection on the sixth. As with much of its history, America constantly dovetails with its...

    This is a fairly good article, and a topic I have been feeding to my American friends since the insurection on the sixth. As with much of its history, America constantly dovetails with its Mediterranean forebear.

    I didn't think the article would touch on how the devolution of the Republic began over a hundred years before Caeser with the Gracchi. It took 111 years, by my personal estimate, from beginning, to end, for the Republic to fall. There were multiple events from the showstoppers like the Gracchi, Marius and Sulla, Caesar to the innumerable small every day failures that are harder to document. Some of it pairs up quite nicely with Modern America, while some of it belongs wholly to antiquity. Despite this, one thread ties the two Republics together, and that is the growing political apathy that became endemic to the system.

    Augustus was no Trump, as he was much to competent for that. That comparison would probably go to Tiberius, Augustus' successor. And whereas Trump is offering a fairly comfortable America a return to something that has never existed, Augustus was offering a country torn asunder by a century of civil war and political assassinations a return to stability. But in the end the result is the same, with massive societal apathy.

    Normally I would ask "how do we fix this?" but, perhaps, the fall of "empires" is inevitable. No matter how well we can read the notes we can't do anything to change the song.

    As defeatist as it sounds, the oft repeated path seems to be set. It won't be tomorrow and it won't be this year, but make no mistake, America as we know it is dying. The Capitol insurrection wasn't the first step but it was certainly the most obvious, and it's all down hill from here.