8 votes

How Minneapolis freed itself from the stranglehold of single-family homes

2 comments

  1. NaraVara
    (edited )
    Link
    Love this picture in the article. Any time you advocate for density or urbanism people always assume you're trying to turn their suburb or peripheral neighborhood/town into Manhattan. But more...

    Love this picture in the article. Any time you advocate for density or urbanism people always assume you're trying to turn their suburb or peripheral neighborhood/town into Manhattan. But more often than not, it's just this. The quiet street is still just a quiet street. If you're going from single family to multi-family dwellings you're unlikely to substantially change that unless the number of people you're adding gets close to triple-digits. This is especially true when you build with modern insulation and let people ride bikes and electric vehicles. There won't be that much noise.

    Depending on how big the units are that building is, at minimum, 8 units on a plot that would otherwise be one single family home. This is a pretty massive increase in density that barely impacts the character of the street at all. It impacts the look of the street more due to the materials its built with and the aesthetic style than the scale.

    2 votes
  2. moriarty
    Link
    Oregon has also done this statewide. And California is looking into this on very sprawled cities in the bay area. It seems like a national movement.

    Oregon has also done this statewide. And California is looking into this on very sprawled cities in the bay area. It seems like a national movement.

    1 vote