NaraVara's recent activity

  1. Comment on Please stop closing forums and moving people to Discord in ~tech

    NaraVara
    Link Parent
    It's not a satisfying explanation to posit that assholism just grew up on its own. The growth is coincident with the rise of social media sites that gamify participation and design for engagement....

    There's always been assholes on the internet, but somehow it got worse over the past 8 years or so.

    It's not a satisfying explanation to posit that assholism just grew up on its own. The growth is coincident with the rise of social media sites that gamify participation and design for engagement. Awarding points for talking encourages you to talk in ways that get you points. Intense statements get more points and attract more attention. Thus assholes proliferate, people see this sort of behavior and become socialized into behaving this way. They then bring that behavior everywhere they go.

    6 votes
  2. Comment on Please stop closing forums and moving people to Discord in ~tech

    NaraVara
    Link Parent
    Part of the problem is that if you don’t stand up your own discord and subreddit, someone else will stand up an unofficial one that speaks for your community that you don’t have any control over....

    Part of the problem is that if you don’t stand up your own discord and subreddit, someone else will stand up an unofficial one that speaks for your community that you don’t have any control over. It becomes necessary to have your company’s community engagement people engaging in these sites anyway, so you might as well just go all in and figure out how to hold the reins on it.

    Reddit and Discord own the space because they just have natural advantages of scale. People can be exposed to your community without seeking it out if it makes it to /r/all. People don’t need to sign up for an account to participate so your subreddit will naturally be bigger and more active than your official forums. There’s just no way around it. Game companies and publications want to focus on making games or publishing articles. Community management is a side thing for them, they don’t want to invest more into it than they have to, and maintaining or standing up Reddit alternatives are expensive and difficult.

    18 votes
  3. Comment on Backpage founders get mistrial because US overplayed child sex trafficking claims in ~news

    NaraVara
    Link
    It seems the "everything involving sex + money is sex trafficking" gambit has limits after all

    It seems the "everything involving sex + money is sex trafficking" gambit has limits after all

    5 votes
  4. Comment on Apple must allow other forms of in-app purchases, rules judge in Epic v. Apple in ~tech

    NaraVara
    Link
    Am I missing the wording here? It sounds to me like they're making it so Apple can't bar them from mentioning alternate payment/registration methods in Apps. It doesn't say anything about banning...

    Am I missing the wording here? It sounds to me like they're making it so Apple can't bar them from mentioning alternate payment/registration methods in Apps. It doesn't say anything about banning them from using these systems outright (which Apple could still theoretically do but probably wouldn't).

    This manages to avoid the "but what about game consoles" argument, since they generally do just ban you from using other payment systems outright. (For games anyway).

    1 vote
  5. Comment on Plans for $400-billion new city in the American desert unveiled in ~design

    NaraVara
    Link Parent
    It doesn’t take much to start a food truck sure, but you need enough disposable income sloshing around for people to spend money on it. I’m not sure remote work alone can do it because digital...

    It doesn’t take much to start a food truck sure, but you need enough disposable income sloshing around for people to spend money on it. I’m not sure remote work alone can do it because digital nomads, as a rule, tend to be nomadic. They’re not going to lay down roots and do the work of “place making.”

    3 votes
  6. Comment on Plans for $400-billion new city in the American desert unveiled in ~design

    NaraVara
    Link
    The ideas of what should go into a city are good, but he seems to be missing the key ingredient which is that a city needs an economy in order to function. What are the people here supposed to do...

    The ideas of what should go into a city are good, but he seems to be missing the key ingredient which is that a city needs an economy in order to function. What are the people here supposed to do to make a living? Is it near a major trade-port or railway hub that can attract merchants? Is it a fertile alluvial plain that grows crops and exports food? Are there mineral deposits that people can mine? Is it the capital of a large empire that can bring in tax money and export administration? Can it attract enough tourists to keep an economy roaring?

    If there isn't an economic activity (or actually many activities) to support people's livelihoods then it's not really a city. It's a public housing development in the middle of nowhere. You need an economic foundation first and then you can worry about the built environment. You could maybe bootstrap it by just paying people a stipend to live there for a while until people start developing businesses that bring money in. But a mere billionaire isn't going to be able to do that for long. There's probably 5 people on Earth with that kind of personal wealth, none of them are this guy, and even those guys have all their wealth tied up in equities so it's not actually liquid enough to do that.

    8 votes
  7. Comment on Unsecure at any speed? in ~tech

    NaraVara
    Link Parent
    They do. It can actually be a pretty cushy sinecure for old programmers.

    They do. It can actually be a pretty cushy sinecure for old programmers.

    1 vote
  8. Comment on Unsecure at any speed? in ~tech

    NaraVara
    Link Parent
    If you're doing any kind of payment processing you're subject to the same rules. It's a pretty blanket thing.

    If you're doing any kind of payment processing you're subject to the same rules. It's a pretty blanket thing.

    2 votes
  9. Comment on Unsecure at any speed? in ~tech

    NaraVara
    Link Parent
    Financial systems are mostly governed by PCI/DSS requirements (see here). Though, as far as I know, those standards should apply globally. If it "feels" more strictly regulated in terms of...

    Financial systems are mostly governed by PCI/DSS requirements (see here). Though, as far as I know, those standards should apply globally. If it "feels" more strictly regulated in terms of legalese and hoops to jump, that may just be an artifact of the fact that most US Banks were, until very recently, still relying on systems that run COBOL mainframes and are held together by several decades worth of hot-fixes.

    There are also a lot of reporting and compliance requirements for them that also contribute to the friction. These are mostly Sarbanes-Oxley (SarbOx), stuff related to anti-terrorism/money-laundering efforts, or stuff related to the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA). SarbOx stuff shouldn't really affect anything you encounter on a consumer level, though it is a giant pain on the administrative end for the banks themselves. The FCPA mostly just comes into play if you do business abroad in countries where bribery for services is common. The anti-terror stuff does tend to slow things down if you have to manage financial assets or transfer of funds overseas though.

    There's also some regulations around compliance with various embargoes we have against North Korea, Cuba, Iran, Russia, (and probably Afghanistan soon). This, again, probably doesn't affect an end-user unless you're directly dealing in industries heavily influenced by import/export of something that comes out of those countries such as cigars, rum, oil, saffron, etc.

    In many cases, I'd say a big part of the reason for these sorts of financial regulations and disclosure requirements is probably just Wall Street pressure. Hedge Funders are politically influential and they exert pressure in their capacity as shareholders in most major companies as well as their capacity as rich, politically connectors donors to make sure regulations that help them do their jobs stay in place.

    6 votes
  10. Comment on Unsecure at any speed? in ~tech

    NaraVara
    Link Parent
    They can pivot in a "we can check the box" way, but I don't know if they can pivot in a "we can do the analytical work this task requires" way. The GDPR cookie law is a good example. There is a...

    then teams should be able to pivot to handle new regulations just fine

    They can pivot in a "we can check the box" way, but I don't know if they can pivot in a "we can do the analytical work this task requires" way.

    The GDPR cookie law is a good example. There is a very straightforward way to comply that involves forcing a banner in people's faces and using dark patterns to make them accept cookies. This is the pitfall of trying to use a regulatory hammer that's focused on a specific feature rather than holistically addressing the business decisions that lead to all the unnecessary data collection requiring the cookie law to go into effect in the first place.

    8 votes
  11. Comment on Climate change won't stop while America hates trains and walking in ~enviro

    NaraVara
    Link Parent
    Moving the ships are only part of the shipping supply chain. You also gotta truck things to and from the ships, load/unload the ships, and support all the logistical infrastructure for maintaining...

    Moving the ships are only part of the shipping supply chain. You also gotta truck things to and from the ships, load/unload the ships, and support all the logistical infrastructure for maintaining the ships (fueling, cleaning, maintenance, etc.)

    Even that together I suspect is probably still pretty efficient though. But we could probably make it more efficient if we had more and better freight rail to facilitate getting things to and from the ports.

    5 votes
  12. Comment on Climate change won't stop while America hates trains and walking in ~enviro

    NaraVara
    Link Parent
    My dad's village, in rural India with a population of under 1,000 people, was about as rural as one gets and the schools and stores were all within walking distance. (There were no restaurants...

    I found it a bit odd that the survey asked about the importance of living within walking distance of "schools, stores and restaurants." Someone who places great importance on all these things is looking for a very specific urban lifestyle.

    My dad's village, in rural India with a population of under 1,000 people, was about as rural as one gets and the schools and stores were all within walking distance. (There were no restaurants though). There is a pattern to develop rural areas that can make it walkable to reach most daily necessities and do away with the need for car trips unless it's a special occasion or you need to haul something heavy. Kids in all sorts of living environments have gone to friends' houses, run small errands, and walked themselves to school since time immemorial.

    Now there are tradeoffs. To have schools so accessible you get smaller, one or two-room schoolhouses instead of the giant schools with hundreds of students. The stores are smaller shops with pretty limited selections so you need to make longer trips for a lot of things since they're not massive, fully-stocked supermarkets. But that's fine since the point isn't to forbid the existence of cars, but to make it possible to live and fully participate in society without having to own one.

    11 votes
  13. Comment on Unsecure at any speed? in ~tech

    NaraVara
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    It's a really slow process and wouldn't really gel with Agile or any of the iterative design methods of the software industry. That stuff is all designed for an industrial/assembly line model...

    It's a really slow process and wouldn't really gel with Agile or any of the iterative design methods of the software industry. That stuff is all designed for an industrial/assembly line model where you do it once and run it a thousand times since it's expensive to retool an assembly line. It's actually pretty cheap to pull a new version to production though (as in the literal task of pushing the button, not all the due diligence stuff you need to do before pushing the button). So the practice of going through long audit processes of certifying that something is up to standard has a hard time keeping up with how often versions get updated.

    For example, cars have manufacturing pipelines that stretch years before they actually hit the showroom and they're doing compliance checks the whole way. In software development you might not even know what features you're implementing 2 weeks from now until you have a sprint planning meeting.

    8 votes
  14. Comment on Unsecure at any speed? in ~tech

    NaraVara
    Link
    Talks about the issues with how the technology industry develops products without security or privacy in mind and makes an analogy to automotive design prior to the 60s. More of a polemic than...

    Talks about the issues with how the technology industry develops products without security or privacy in mind and makes an analogy to automotive design prior to the 60s. More of a polemic than solution on how to do better though.

    6 votes
  15. Comment on Climate change won't stop while America hates trains and walking in ~enviro

    NaraVara
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    Most of these places existed before the invention of cars and it’s not as if most poor yeoman were able to afford horses and buggies. Saying you need a car is evincing a lack of imagination. You...

    Most of these places existed before the invention of cars and it’s not as if most poor yeoman were able to afford horses and buggies. Saying you need a car is evincing a lack of imagination. You need a car because the built environment is designed to force one on you.

    11 votes
  16. Comment on Climate change won't stop while America hates trains and walking in ~enviro

    NaraVara
    Link Parent
    Suburbs are tied to an urban core. The whole suburban lifestyle is underwritten by an urban economy it’s attached to. That’s what differentiates suburbs from exurbs. And exurbs are also urban,...

    Suburbs are tied to an urban core. The whole suburban lifestyle is underwritten by an urban economy it’s attached to. That’s what differentiates suburbs from exurbs. And exurbs are also urban, they’re just examples of god awful urban planning (or lack thereof).

    And I think if we got down to one car per household and that car was electric, we'd be doing well.

    Not really. The core issue with cars is geometry, not what’s powering them. Literally nobody says you need to delete all cars from existence, just that you need to not make it the preferred model of transportation for people to get around. Designing for cars last makes built environments look very different than designing only for cars with everything else as an afterthought.

    If you design for cars last many people do default to a car free lifestyle because cars are expensive. If you can’t have lots of people being car free that implies there is some failure of infrastructure planning that is necessitating car ownership. There is no solution to the traffic problem with this pathway.

    11 votes
  17. Comment on Climate change won't stop while America hates trains and walking in ~enviro

    NaraVara
    Link Parent
    This is another way of saying that it is a problem for 84% of Americans.

    Space for vehicles isn’t really a problem outside cities.

    This is another way of saying that it is a problem for 84% of Americans.

    16 votes