NaraVara's recent activity

  1. Comment on I haven't owned a car in 12 years. What should I buy? in ~hobbies.automotive

    NaraVara
    Link Parent
    Nice. I had forgotten all about Subaru which is weird considering half the cars in front of my building are Outbacks. The WRX looks nice. I was kind of hoping for a hatchback since it's easier to...

    Nice. I had forgotten all about Subaru which is weird considering half the cars in front of my building are Outbacks.

    The WRX looks nice. I was kind of hoping for a hatchback since it's easier to load a dog into the car, but the fun factor might make up for it.

  2. Comment on I haven't owned a car in 12 years. What should I buy? in ~hobbies.automotive

    NaraVara
    Link Parent
    Honestly, this sounds dumb, but I just really can't stand the Civic's design. It looks like something I would have thought was awesome when I was 16, but the thought of driving around in one in my...

    Honestly, this sounds dumb, but I just really can't stand the Civic's design. It looks like something I would have thought was awesome when I was 16, but the thought of driving around in one in my 30s with a kid in the back just feels kinda silly.

    If it feels good to drive though I'd probably suck it up and do it. I'm sure I'd get over it pretty quick.

    1 vote
  3. Comment on I haven't owned a car in 12 years. What should I buy? in ~hobbies.automotive

    NaraVara
    Link Parent
    Heh I hadn't factored the rebates/incentives into the pricing before, with them it seems like the base model Model 3 is about on par with a GTI. . .

    It's a bit higher than your price, but the Tesla Model 3 does neatly check almost all of your boxes.

    Heh I hadn't factored the rebates/incentives into the pricing before, with them it seems like the base model Model 3 is about on par with a GTI. . .

    1 vote
  4. My question is exactly what it says on the title. For the past 12 years I've lived in a downtown area and all my workplaces have been metro accessible. I've gotten by with car shares and rentals...

    My question is exactly what it says on the title. For the past 12 years I've lived in a downtown area and all my workplaces have been metro accessible. I've gotten by with car shares and rentals and borrowing other people's cars when I really needed them. but I'm applying for a job that would have about 45min to 1 hour commutes each way and will need a car to get by. I'm also just looking forward to having one, both because I have a dog now and my wife and I will start trying for a kid soon and it just seems more convenient to get around than relying on lyfts.

    Yet having been out of needing to care about cars for 12 years, the modern world of everything being electronic is new and scary to me. Apparently transmissions don't need to shift gears anymore, there are alerts and alarms and sensors everywhere. . . I'm lost. I need help folks.

    So here's what I'm looking for, ordered by priority:

    • Visibility! I live in a city with busy streets and am terrified of accidentally killing a cyclist or scooter. So visibility is important to me, both blind-spot visibility and visibility on turns. Every rental or car share I've used has had shit for rear visibility. This includes the Ford Fiesta, the Mercedes GLC, and the Mercedes GLA. The Chevy Cruze has been okay, but still pales in comparison to the faithful 1999 Sentra of my youth.
    • Fun! I haven't owned a car in forever. I want to enjoy driving it. A manual is out as my wife will need to drive it too, but something that feels peppy and has a good drive feel is important to me. I really like to "feel" like I'm driving and want something with really responsive steering and an okay amount of pick-up. We don't need to be getting into racer level, but I also don't want it to feel like I'm struggling to merge onto the highway (as I often do in a rental Fiesta or Cruze).
    • Easy to park. Again, I'm in a city and parallel parking can be a giant pain and I always feel guilty holding up the people behind me when I'm doing it. Some of these features to alert when you're close to the car behind you or the simulated overhead view that some cars can give you seem great. I'd probably just settle for a backup camera and proximity sensors though.
    • Cost of ownership
    • Roomy and easy to get in and out of, including loading dogs and car seats for kids. I want to be able to drive around 5 people comfortably, with decent shoulder room and not make people feel cramped on long drives.
    • Not too "basic." As in, I value some level of novelty and originality and would prefer something unique that not everyone else has. This is the most childish of my requests, so I don't rank it too highly.

    Price-wise I'm leaning towards around $30,000 and could maybe be persuaded to get to around $40,000 for something that's REALLY perfect and cheap to own long-term. I'm currently considering a Prius, the Mazda3, a VW Golf, and a Toyota Rav4. I generally prefer sedans because of the responsiveness and drive-feel.

    My logical brain is leaning Prius, but my inner teenager is saying "DO NOT GO GENTLE INTO BEING A LAME OLD MAN!!" The Golf and the Rav4 Hybrid are kind of tied. The Rav4 is bigger and harder to park, but it is roomier and has a lower cost of ownership. The Golf seems easier to park and would be more fun to drive, but it's also kind of expensive if I opt for a GTI or sport version. Plus it has less room, seems less luxe, and. . .I don't know it just looks kinda bland. I'm definitely leaning towards a low-mileage certified pre-owned whichever way I go just to not have to pay for depreciation.

    So, any advice? Any other suggestions? Anything, feature-wise, I should be paying particular attention to?

    The Mazda3 hatch seems really nice, but I'm worried I will 100% kill a cyclist

    3 votes
  5. Comment on The FGC9 is a 3D Printed firearm that is built from unregulated components and costs 100$ to make in ~hobbies

    NaraVara
    Link Parent
    Even more importantly, one of the founders' main concerns with the Bill of Rights was that they worried it would create the false impression that these are the only rights guaranteed by the...

    Never mind that it was an amendment to start with.

    Even more importantly, one of the founders' main concerns with the Bill of Rights was that they worried it would create the false impression that these are the only rights guaranteed by the Constitution and would elevate them above other pressing rights and needs that people might have. From their perspective, the structure of Constitutional government itself was the ultimate guarantor of peoples' individual rights and liberties.

    "There remains but one other view of this matter to conclude the point. The truth is, after all the declamation we have heard, that the constitution is itself in every rational sense, and to every useful purpose, A BILL OF RIGHTS. The several bills of rights, in Great-Britain, form its constitution, and conversely the constitution of each state is its bill of rights. And the proposed constitution, if adopted, will be the bill of rights of the union."

    The Bill of Rights was never intended to be a strict accounting of all peoples' natural rights, and our conception of what our natural rights are is supposed to evolve according to the needs of the time. This was certainly the intention behind Madison and Hamilton's design for the government, and the "originalist" interpretations are purely ahistorical and tend to get thrown out by their own proponents as soon as its convenient to the Republican party's prospects besides.

    What's more, conventional interpretations of the 2nd Amendment as granting a boundaryless right to own whatever kinds of guns you want are also absolutely ahistorical. Most states restricted gun ownership to specific individuals (specifically free Blacks were forbidden) from the day the Constitution was signed. When the Bill of Rights was written the rights guaranteed were considered to be restrictions on the Federal governments' scope of action, not state governments. The intent was to prevent the Federal government from encroaching on the States' rights, but the idea that the Framers believed there were no public safety arguments to curtail individual gun ownership is completely ahistorical. It was assumed States would do the necessary regulating.

    Indeed, this was the finding in US v. Cruickshank, and conservatives were just fine with it when it meant keeping the government from enforcing the free speech rights of Black people. It wasn't until the late 30s when some provisions in the Bill of Rights were extended down. But this didn't happen for the 2nd Amendment until 2010. And that was purely the result of Republicans having stacked the courts with conservative justices for 30 years prior specifically to get this result, so it's hardly a good faith or legitimate interpretation of things.

    2 votes
  6. Comment on The FGC9 is a 3D Printed firearm that is built from unregulated components and costs 100$ to make in ~hobbies

    NaraVara
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    You can make pipe-bombs from household parts, but we still have laws about building explosives in your garage and doing so can constitute prima facie evidence that you’re up to no good. The very...

    You can make pipe-bombs from household parts, but we still have laws about building explosives in your garage and doing so can constitute prima facie evidence that you’re up to no good. The very fact that doing so is legally actionable gives law enforcement the ability to stop things before they get out of hand.

    One of the main problems with preventing mass shootings and even domestic partner violence with guns is exactly that it is considered illegitimate for the police to take action against you for owning a gun whilst being provably unhinged or having multiple domestic violence charges against you.

    6 votes
  7. Comment on Democratic Debate #3 - Sept 12 2019 in ~news

    NaraVara
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    I think it’s great that whoever shanks Biden the hardest sees a polling surge. It was Harris before, it’ll be Castro tomorrow.

    I think it’s great that whoever shanks Biden the hardest sees a polling surge. It was Harris before, it’ll be Castro tomorrow.

    3 votes
  8. Comment on Democratic Debate #3 - Sept 12 2019 in ~news

    NaraVara
    Link Parent
    I’m still cracking up about “I’m Asian, so I know a lot of doctors.”

    I’m still cracking up about “I’m Asian, so I know a lot of doctors.”

    5 votes
  9. Comment on Democratic Debate #3 - Sept 12 2019 in ~news

    NaraVara
    Link Parent
    Republicans did about Reagan.

    Republicans did about Reagan.

    5 votes
  10. Comment on Democratic Debate #3 - Sept 12 2019 in ~news

    NaraVara
    Link
    There’s a lot of deference to Obama here. The tone is almost like he’s a prophet and everyone is trying to fulfill and decode his message. I was a big Obama stan and still admire him greatly, but...

    There’s a lot of deference to Obama here. The tone is almost like he’s a prophet and everyone is trying to fulfill and decode his message.

    I was a big Obama stan and still admire him greatly, but the pseudo-deification is a little weird.

    12 votes
  11. Comment on Democratic Debate #3 - Sept 12 2019 in ~news

    NaraVara
    Link Parent
    Little details like that don’t actually happen and always get moderated in the legislative sausage machine. It’s also only really a problem for the insurance industry, which is a concern as it...

    Little details like that don’t actually happen and always get moderated in the legislative sausage machine.

    It’s also only really a problem for the insurance industry, which is a concern as it makes people unemployed. But I don’t see why it’s an issue for anyone else. If the concern is whether we can scale up Medicare that fast I think that’s perfectly viable.

    9 votes
  12. Comment on Democratic Debate #3 - Sept 12 2019 in ~news

    NaraVara
    Link Parent
    He’s leading in the hoarse race.

    He’s leading in the hoarse race.

    8 votes
  13. Comment on How Eating Out Keeps You Poor in ~finance

    NaraVara
    Link Parent
    Subsidized student loans can be. Also some car dealerships do financing deals with APRs that are basically free money. It's ridiculous.

    No consumer debt is going to be as low interest rate as you can make in stocks or bonds.

    Subsidized student loans can be. Also some car dealerships do financing deals with APRs that are basically free money. It's ridiculous.

    1 vote
  14. Comment on How Eating Out Keeps You Poor in ~finance

    NaraVara
    Link Parent
    Probably less influence than they have on the number of meals people take away from home.

    What kind of influence do you think the people who made this video have on healthcare, education, and housing costs?

    Probably less influence than they have on the number of meals people take away from home.

  15. Comment on How Eating Out Keeps You Poor in ~finance

    NaraVara
    Link Parent
    6 of 1, half dozen of the other. If you're in a food desert the availability is also usually an issue of convenience. It's the "convenience" of hoofing it or riding a bus to get to a grocery...

    That's an argument of convenience, not of availability.

    6 of 1, half dozen of the other. If you're in a food desert the availability is also usually an issue of convenience. It's the "convenience" of hoofing it or riding a bus to get to a grocery store.

    Still, even accounting for that, things like frozen dinners still put you ahead of all but the absolute lowest quality fast food prices, as far as affordability are significantly more convenient than even waiting in line at a drive through, and are generally healthier than most restaurant food also.

    Not really if you like anything resembling variety or taste. A chipotle burrito is dirt cheap for 2 meals worth of food, and doesn't involve having to carry a lunchbox with you.

    All this and you're assuming people are going to sit there and do this math each day rather than figuring out their meals as they go along like normal human beings instead of self-optimizing homo economicii. For what, exactly? To moralize at people showing their revealed preference in a way that only serves to distract from the actual structural issues at the root of the problem?

    2 votes
  16. Comment on How Eating Out Keeps You Poor in ~finance

    NaraVara
    Link Parent
    Work a few shifts in a diner and you'll get a sense for how much energy you have left to cook for a family when you're done.

    Work a few shifts in a diner and you'll get a sense for how much energy you have left to cook for a family when you're done.

    3 votes
  17. Comment on How Eating Out Keeps You Poor in ~finance

    NaraVara
    Link Parent
    How is it less desirable to have it all done for you? I'm not talking Blue Apron. I'm talking meal kits. Only for a window. When they're young they're more harm than good, and when they're older...

    How are those prep services relevant? That's even less desirable.

    How is it less desirable to have it all done for you? I'm not talking Blue Apron. I'm talking meal kits.

    Plus, ideally, when cooking for the family—if there is any discipline at all and barring multiple infants (who don't eat anything complicated anyways)—there would be at least one extra pair of hands to help.

    Only for a window. When they're young they're more harm than good, and when they're older they're generally too busy to be involved. High school aged kids these days are over scheduled to hell. Ordering a pizza for the group becomes really easy when you work multiple shifts and are on your feet all day.

    1 vote
  18. Comment on How Eating Out Keeps You Poor in ~finance

    NaraVara
    Link Parent
    Restaurants get food delivered in trucks, they're not getting it from a grocery. And in most cases, it's fast food so the food is mostly pre-processed.

    It's my understanding of the food desert problem that food deserts lack easy accessibility of any fresh food whatsoever.

    Restaurants get food delivered in trucks, they're not getting it from a grocery. And in most cases, it's fast food so the food is mostly pre-processed.

    1 vote
  19. Comment on How Eating Out Keeps You Poor in ~finance

    NaraVara
    Link Parent
    There are meal prep services that just pre-make the food and send it to you to heat up. Basically TV dinners, but fresher. And cooking for yourself in bulk is a lot easier than for a family. You...

    There are meal prep services that just pre-make the food and send it to you to heat up. Basically TV dinners, but fresher.

    And cooking for yourself in bulk is a lot easier than for a family. You get bulk discounts, but prep and cleaning end up taking a lot more time.

    1 vote
  20. Comment on How Eating Out Keeps You Poor in ~finance

    NaraVara
    Link Parent
    I was specifically talking about the cultural norm that everyone have their own kitchen regardless of personal/living situation. In a world without that norm, people wouldn't be choosing to live...

    I was specifically talking about the cultural norm that everyone have their own kitchen regardless of personal/living situation. In a world without that norm, people wouldn't be choosing to live in isolated pods that are far away from each other. Like I said, even rural or manoral economies historically tended to keep people clustered together for safety and security as much as anything else. The idea of nuclear families in disconnected domiciles is a historic aberration.

    3 votes