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News to Me

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    Thomas Morton, a contributing writer and editor for VICE Magazine critiques his entry in a new book, Merchants of Truth by Jill Abrahamson (former executive editor for The New York Times). I'm...

    Thomas Morton, a contributing writer and editor for VICE Magazine critiques his entry in a new book, Merchants of Truth by Jill Abrahamson (former executive editor for The New York Times).

    I'm posting this in ~news because it's an excoriating essay on the hypocrisies of traditional journalism, and a classic example of projecting your own faults on perceived enemies despite having a recorded interview for reference.

    I'm personally disgusted by the Times' failures to inform, its cheerleading and propaganda for most of the wars the U.S. has been involved in, and frequently slapdash, slanted or selectively omitted treatment of facts, all hidden behind a neutral, faux-objective style.

    An example from the essay:

    ...I refuse to accept that any altered state of consciousness could impel me to liken Vice to a fraternity. That’s been the go-to characterization of the company by lazy critics for decades, and it’s as off the mark as it is insulting to all the women who’ve worked at Vice and whose contributions to the magazine, the videos, and the overall operation have been essential to its style, its culture, and its success for as long as I’ve been there.

    I just did some quick apple-Fing and found not one mention in the whole book of any of the female colleagues I told Abramson about working under and with. No Amie Barrodale, who expanded Vice’s editorial content into fiction and literature. No Lesley Arfin, whose writing style and sense of humor basically beget the Vice “voice.” No Monica Hampton, who led our fledgling video efforts back in the VBS days. No Amy Kellner, who brought Vice into the downtown NY art scene and helped forge its visual aesthetic — woops! Sorry, there is one mention of Amy Kellner. Abramson quotes from her interview with that old riot grrl band Bratmobile, which Kellner used as an opportunity to frame this very debate about Vice as a bunch of fratty dudes, way back in 2002! Only Abramson includes it so she can pass off Kells’ punchline to the article, “I hate me,” as a pained, earnest “confession” that somehow slipped past the misogynist editors.

    2 votes