patience_limited's recent activity

  1. Comment on She took her amputated leg home, and you can too in ~misc

    patience_limited
    Link
    Umm... This is relevant to my interests? I'll see what the Ortho doc says about keeping my leftovers; human bone has a long history as an art medium. It would greatly amuse me to craft a piece of...

    Umm... This is relevant to my interests? I'll see what the Ortho doc says about keeping my leftovers; human bone has a long history as an art medium. It would greatly amuse me to craft a piece of jewelry or other useful object from my own trochanter, though I'd really like a bionic leg as well.

    3 votes
  2. Comment on What are you doing this week? in ~talk

    patience_limited
    Link
    House-shopping, studying, exercising, desultorily browsing the local job market... and seeing the orthopedist to schedule hip replacement surgery. Even though all the research I've done so far...

    House-shopping, studying, exercising, desultorily browsing the local job market... and seeing the orthopedist to schedule hip replacement surgery.

    Even though all the research I've done so far says there's no other effective conventional or alternative treatment for loss of hip cartilage, and significant benefits to getting it over with, I'll confess this scares me shitless.

    I've managed to get through life so far without any really major surgical interventions, but I've had enough contact with inept healthcare to develop a significant phobia. Get knocked out, carved up, and have chunks of bone replaced with stainless steel thingies? Not a good time, have to be elsewhere! [I did grow up on episodes of The Six Million Dollar Man, and there's a hopeful bit of me that wants a better cyborg body afterwards.]

    This also really feels like the final demarcation between youthful healthy life and the decline of aging. The debility has meant confronting my own ageism and ableism, and those are not pretty at all.

    5 votes
  3. Comment on Kind Words (Tildes Edition) in ~talk

    patience_limited
    Link Parent
    Response: Sincere hugs and gratitude for your accomplishments, whether it feels to you like you deserve them or not. I've gone through a very similar experience in a different field recently, and...

    Response:
    Sincere hugs and gratitude for your accomplishments, whether it feels to you like you deserve them or not.

    I've gone through a very similar experience in a different field recently, and on prior occasions. I also had a family member who dropped out of teaching after 40 years, with only another year to full retirement.

    It's not the end of the world, regardless of whether you decide to continue or change roles. Understand that whatever happens is not your fault. Teaching is an incredibly difficult, demanding profession with loads of emotional labor. If you're in the U.S., you'll barely get any professional respect at all, at least in part because of the stupid and inequitable ways we fund and regulate education. I'm personally acquainted with at least eight teachers who've called it quits, for reasons ranging from horrible parents to physical assault, active shooter drills, and mental breakdown. It's not just you.

    In short, whatever decision you make, have some clarity that it's not your failure or shortcoming that brought you to this difficult place.

    I'm very familiar with the career burnout plus depression you're describing. The ugly thing about depression is that it will lie to you - you may think of every possible means of blaming yourself for your situation, constantly replay what you should have done, under-rate your generalizable skills, and otherwise collect sticks to beat yourself with. You may never forgive yourself for operating in the real world of incomplete information, where no one has actually come up with better answers or strategies for life than what you've arrived at, without great good fortune or powerful allies.

    The ongoing financial stress is just another layer of painful constraint and obligation, the sunk cost fallacy that binds you to continue in a torturous path.

    It sounds like you're at the point where professional help would be beneficial. I'm guessing your life is so full of demands that it may seem impossible to include self-care. From what you've indicated, your day-to-day stress is costing you sleep and you feel that your emotional life is no longer under your control. You're signaling that you feel helpless in your situation. For me, that feeling was the crucial indication that I needed an outside perspective. You should consider seeing a peer or external counselor, and likely a psychiatrist.

    Burnout is an insidious, traitorous phenomenon - it can manifest as both depression and physical illnesses from stress. Please don't wait until the ongoing injuries to your body and mind make the decision for you - get help, start testing all the strategies for change.

    Thank you for reaching out and listening to people who appreciate you and care about your well-being.

    Please feel free to PM me for advice, support, or any other help I can provide. I've welcomed your presence on Tildes and wish you happiness, whether or not you find it in your choice of profession.

    3 votes
  4. Comment on Richard Stallman resigns as president of the Free Software Foundation, and from his position at MIT in ~tech

    patience_limited
    Link Parent
    The word you're looking for is ultracrepidarianism - it's an idea that has broad application, though it has some overlap with mansplaining. It's not that Richard Stallman has social-cognitive...

    The word you're looking for is ultracrepidarianism - it's an idea that has broad application, though it has some overlap with mansplaining.

    It's not that Richard Stallman has social-cognitive issues that cause regular foot-in-mouth disease, it's that he has long felt free to offer uninformed opinions, speaking ex cathedra from a position of power and authority.

    11 votes
  5. Comment on Mental Models: The Best Way to Make Intelligent Decisions (109 Models Explained) in ~science.social

    patience_limited
    Link Parent
    I think of "slow is smooth, smooth is fast" as an example of a heuristic method - a solution from a problem solving technique that implicitly or explicitly draws on many mental models and...

    I think of "slow is smooth, smooth is fast" as an example of a heuristic method - a solution from a problem solving technique that implicitly or explicitly draws on many mental models and empirical testing to arrive at a satisfactory rule-of-thumb solution. I guess you could say that heuristic problem solving is another useful mental model?

  6. Comment on Who is "John Smith" in your country? in ~talk

    patience_limited
    Link Parent
    Not trying to close the conversation! As I said, I don't know if it's factual - just because it's Wikipedia, it doesn't mean that that the article provides broad coverage of people's languages and...

    Not trying to close the conversation! As I said, I don't know if it's factual - just because it's Wikipedia, it doesn't mean that that the article provides broad coverage of people's languages and common usage. Even if there's an "official" placeholder name for statistics or other purposes, I want to know about what people use them for in ordinary speech. [My mother used "Moishe Cohen" idiomatically to mean something like, "who is this garden-variety idiot?"]

    2 votes
  7. Comment on Who is "John Smith" in your country? in ~talk

    patience_limited
    Link
    I don't know how canonical or idiomatic the Wikipedia list of placeholder names is, but the Yiddishism that I grew up with was "Moishe Cohen". "Moishe" is anglicized as Moses. "Cohen" is the...

    I don't know how canonical or idiomatic the Wikipedia list of placeholder names is, but the Yiddishism that I grew up with was "Moishe Cohen". "Moishe" is anglicized as Moses. "Cohen" is the Jewish equivalent of "Smith", as the common surname adopted for the rabbinic Kahanim families.

    5 votes
  8. Comment on Mental Models: The Best Way to Make Intelligent Decisions (109 Models Explained) in ~science.social

    patience_limited
    Link Parent
    Fair enough, thank you, though interdisciplinary analysis tends to fall under education.

    Fair enough, thank you, though interdisciplinary analysis tends to fall under education.

  9. Comment on Do Sleep-Tracking Apps Actually Help You Sleep Better? in ~health

    patience_limited
    Link
    I've been messing around with sleep tracking using the Misfit Vapor X Android smartwatch and the Sleep As Android app. The app does use heart rate tracking to evaluate deep sleep versus light and...

    I've been messing around with sleep tracking using the Misfit Vapor X Android smartwatch and the Sleep As Android app. The app does use heart rate tracking to evaluate deep sleep versus light and REM, and I've found the results do seem to correlate with how I feel the next day.

    1 vote
  10. Comment on On whose green Earth? in ~enviro

    patience_limited
    Link
    This is a good brief article on the diversity of mainstream religious approaches to environmental stewardship and climate change. Given prior surveys, most Tilders are neither religious nor...

    This is a good brief article on the diversity of mainstream religious approaches to environmental stewardship and climate change.

    Given prior surveys, most Tilders are neither religious nor spiritual, and it might be helpful to have a better understanding of religious viewpoints in communicating about the best ways to change behavior and policy.

    The article also discusses the Christian Evangelical "dominionist" faction in the U.S., and Saudi Wahhabism and their role in climate change denialism.

    2 votes
  11. Comment on Mental Models: The Best Way to Make Intelligent Decisions (109 Models Explained) in ~science.social

    patience_limited
    Link
    Posting in ~humanities as the article is a very general laundry list of mental models drawn from a variety of disciplines - mathematics, engineering, business, military, etc. [It's light on models...

    Posting in ~humanities as the article is a very general laundry list of mental models drawn from a variety of disciplines - mathematics, engineering, business, military, etc. [It's light on models from "softer" disciplines other than business, like sociology, but the list is already long.]

    Some of the items are sketchily or inaccurately described, e.g. the "spring-loaded system".

    I can think of a couple of important missing models:

    • the bounded or limited system, where, for whatever reason, you won't see results outside of a practical limit, e.g. negative deaths in a mortality report. This is also subject to invalid assumptions of a boundary, like the zero lower bound of interest rates in monetary policy - it is possible to have a negative interest rate.
    • risk theory - unlike the common perception that risk means the likelihood of an undesirable outcome, risk is that likelihood multiplied by the magnitude of the potential damage. A nuclear reactor accident might be vanishingly improbable, but is nevertheless a high risk because the potential damage is so great.

    Overall, though, it's a good grab-bag of tools that may give you additional useful ways of thinking about the world, regardless of your discipline.

    In the same vein, see the Cognitive Bias Cheatsheet.

  12. Comment on The U.S. Health-Care System Found a Way to Make Peanuts Cost $4,200 in ~health

    patience_limited
    Link
    I hate to keep banging on about how insane the U.S. medical system is, but this is a particularly egregious example. We really need a U.K. or Canadian-style single payer, universal system, with...

    I hate to keep banging on about how insane the U.S. medical system is, but this is a particularly egregious example.

    We really need a U.K. or Canadian-style single payer, universal system, with rational cost controls, that doesn't reward the marketing of inadequately tested, marginally useful (or potentially harmful) treatments.

    5 votes
  13. Comment on Is a meat-free diet really as healthy as vegetarians claim? in ~health

    patience_limited
    Link Parent
    That's incorrect - tempeh is not a reliable source of B12. Even when it's present in a given fermentation, the quantity isn't adequate for long-term health. There are no proven dependable sources...

    That's incorrect - tempeh is not a reliable source of B12. Even when it's present in a given fermentation, the quantity isn't adequate for long-term health. There are no proven dependable sources of active B12 in non-animal foods, other than those contaminated with potentially pathogenic bacteria.

    The only reliable way for vegans to get adequate B12 is through supplements or fortified foods.

    7 votes
  14. Comment on What are you doing this weekend? in ~talk

    patience_limited
    Link Parent
    70° F (21° C), brilliant blue skies without a cloud in sight, 5 mph (8 kph) breezes, 70% humidity. Most importantly for where I am, no bugs. [I realize that for many people, insects don't qualify...

    70° F (21° C), brilliant blue skies without a cloud in sight, 5 mph (8 kph) breezes, 70% humidity. Most importantly for where I am, no bugs. [I realize that for many people, insects don't qualify as weather, but in the places I've lived, they do. Don't think about that too much.]

    2 votes
  15. Comment on What are you doing this weekend? in ~talk

    patience_limited
    Link
    Celebrating my 55th birthday (I may be the oldest person here?). It's been a journey the last couple of years. I actually managed a 3-mile (5 km) hill and dune hike today. It was the first time...

    Celebrating my 55th birthday (I may be the oldest person here?). It's been a journey the last couple of years.

    I actually managed a 3-mile (5 km) hill and dune hike today. It was the first time hiking poles as assistive devices had occurred to me, and I may never put them down again until the f*cking hip replacement. The weather was beyond utterly gorgeous, and the views of the Lake Michigan shore put tropical beach Instagrams to shame.

    There's been a wine tasting dinner involved, too. I'm grateful for the incredibly good fortune to have a fantastic spouse, a great place to live... two out of three (no job yet) ain't bad.

    5 votes
  16. Comment on Help me get my head around DNSCrypt and DoH/DoT in ~comp

    patience_limited
    (edited )
    Link
    For starters, you may want to look at an OpenWRT or DD-WRT travel router, such as this. If there's a wired Internet connection at your destination, you can plug in the travel router for a wireless...

    For starters, you may want to look at an OpenWRT or DD-WRT travel router, such as this.

    If there's a wired Internet connection at your destination, you can plug in the travel router for a wireless bridge, and then use its native OpenVPN support to connect to the VPN of your choice. If you can establish a VPN connection, there are VPN providers which run uncensored, unlogged DNS servers, and this would be your preferred method.

    I've used these devices to circumvent wireless security issues and hotel network proxy snooping/ad injection for years. It's sometimes slow, but much cheaper and more reliable than relying on mobile data, at least in the U.S.

    As to DNSCrypt, etc., you're only guaranteed encryption of your resolution requests, not the remainder of the traffic. Also, depending on your ISP, you may not be able to reach an uncensored DNS server. Likewise for VPN server blocking. Have you tested direct connections to VPN servers by IP, rather than name resolution?

    Update edit: With a little more research on Turkey's DPI deployment, it looks like you'll need a VPN provider that offers "stealth" VPN support.

    Footnote: I've had considerable success with NordVPN, including testing of its Secure VPN (Obfuscated Servers, etc.) features against DPI with the Security team at work. I suspect, though, that it's going to be an ongoing battle with a nation-state program, and I don't know to what extent this may make you a target for law enforcement.

    5 votes