20 votes

Watch the SpaceX Demo-2 crewed launch livestream at 4:33pm ET, May 27th

9 comments

  1. spit-evil-olive-tips
    Link
    My favorite detail that I learned while watching the livestream before it was scrubbed: During uncrewed test firings of the rocket, they placed audio recorders in the crew cabin. Then they played...

    My favorite detail that I learned while watching the livestream before it was scrubbed:

    During uncrewed test firings of the rocket, they placed audio recorders in the crew cabin. Then they played those recordings for the astronauts during training simulations. This allowed the astronauts to get used to the "normal" clunking and hissing and other sounds the vehicle makes while it's being fueled (since fueling takes place just before launch, with the astronauts already on board).

    6 votes
  2. [7]
    CALICO
    Link
    Fuck the weather sometimes. Hope their next try doesn't scrub again.

    Fuck the weather sometimes. Hope their next try doesn't scrub again.

    5 votes
    1. [6]
      unknown user
      (edited )
      Link Parent
      You know that itch that wants to say "just ignore the rule" or "wait 10 more minutes"? That's go fever. I can only imagine that feeling multiplied by an order of magnitude, that's what the ground...

      You know that itch that wants to say "just ignore the rule" or "wait 10 more minutes"? That's go fever.

      I can only imagine that feeling multiplied by an order of magnitude, that's what the ground team and the astronauts must experience. What an intense and surreal feeling it must be to pull the plug on such a historic launch—doing it exactly by the book, to deny your internal gut desire and stay militantly focused on not going to space today, because that's exactly what the last 50 years of spaceflight history successes and mistakes have shown we need to do. And to enter the next chapter in crewed spaceflight, we need to look to the last chapters to keep moving forward.

      16 votes
      1. [4]
        CALICO
        Link Parent
        You're not wrong. I selfishly wanted them to do that T+10 the SpaceX Ground guy joked about. And also because I have several more days of anxiety having nightmares of the last chapters called...

        You're not wrong. I selfishly wanted them to do that T+10 the SpaceX Ground guy joked about.
        And also because I have several more days of anxiety having nightmares of the last chapters called Challenger and Columbia. Super low chance, but a crew loss is the last thing we need right now and a big part of me wants to get this over with so I can stop worrying.

        2 votes
        1. [3]
          blitz
          Link Parent
          The big thing to remember about this manned rocket is that it's the first rocket that has abort capabilities through 100% of it's flight. The space shuttle was bolted to the side of a huge tank...

          The big thing to remember about this manned rocket is that it's the first rocket that has abort capabilities through 100% of it's flight.

          The space shuttle was bolted to the side of a huge tank and basically had no way to separate and fly to safety if something started to go wrong with any of the other components.

          The Soyuz has a launch escape tower, but that is jettisoned before booster separation. The abort that we saw on MS-10 had to be done without it, because something went wrong during booster separation. Thankfully the issue wasn't explosive, because then the crew likely wouldn't have made it back home either.

          Dragon however has the escape system built in to the capsule itself. It's never jettisoned. If at any point something starts to go wrong with the rocket from the moment they start fueling to the moment they dock with the ISS, they have the ability to turn around and go home.

          The abort system did fail once in a test, when they recovered a Dragon 2 (crew dragon predecessor) capsule from the sea and tried to static fire the escape boosters to see what would happen. This is what happened.

          They found the issue and fixed it by massively simplifying the escape system design (details here).

          In short, this is the best design for an abort system ever designed and built for manned spacecraft. Some of my friends were nervous too, and they said that understanding the abort system helped them relax, so I hope I was helpful to you too.

          4 votes
          1. CALICO
            Link Parent
            I don't think anything can get me to stop worrying until it's over with, but I appreciate your post. Most of my worry is tied to amount of emotional weight I'm projecting onto this launch, more...

            I don't think anything can get me to stop worrying until it's over with, but I appreciate your post.

            Most of my worry is tied to amount of emotional weight I'm projecting onto this launch, more than anything to do with the design of the rocket. I'm one of those people who lean heavily into the idea of humanity becoming space-faring, and multi-planetary, and God himself couldn't shake me from that conviction.
            If the first launch carrying American lives on American soil in nine years, on a rocket designed and operated by a commercial party, ends in disaster, then I anticipate that to be a major blow to the future I want to believe in.
            If I'm remembering right, I think I read that NASA gave the launch something like a 0.4% chance of resulting in crew-loss. That's an objectively fantastic number. But nothing short of a sure thing will get me to feel relaxed, and there's no such thing as a sure thing.

            1 vote
          2. unknown user
            Link Parent
            *crewed :P

            manned rocket

            manned spacecraft

            *crewed

            :P

      2. babypuncher
        Link Parent
        The desire not to die probably helps curb that a bit for the astronauts

        The desire not to die probably helps curb that a bit for the astronauts

  3. gpl
    Link
    This is the link to the NASA TV livestream for the SpaceX launch later today. The current schedule has the launch at 4:33pm ET, but there is a chance it will be delayed until May 30th.

    This is the link to the NASA TV livestream for the SpaceX launch later today. The current schedule has the launch at 4:33pm ET, but there is a chance it will be delayed until May 30th.

    4 votes