9 votes

Microsoft urges Congress to regulate use of facial recognition

3 comments

  1. [2]
    toratoratora
    Link
    Glad I quit FB: Also: Gotta love Microsoft.

    Glad I quit FB:

    In April, privacy groups filed a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission saying that Facebook had turned on new face-matching services without obtaining appropriate permission of users. Facebook has denied the groups’ accusations.

    Also:

    In May, for instance, Satya Nadella, Microsoft’s chief executive, said at a company developer conference that privacy was a “human right.” Yet in June, Microsoft donated $195,000 to an effort to defeat a consumer privacy bill in California.

    Gotta love Microsoft.

    8 votes
    1. hungariantoast
      Link Parent
      There was a post to /r/linux today about Microsoft. Several people in that thread were happy to point out how much Microsoft has changed and how Embrace, Extend, Extinguish doesn't make sense in...

      Gotta love Microsoft.

      There was a post to /r/linux today about Microsoft. Several people in that thread were happy to point out how much Microsoft has changed and how Embrace, Extend, Extinguish doesn't make sense in the context of Microsoft's actions lately, especially their open sourcing of several pieces of software, such as Visual Studio Code.

      It seems people don't understand that using "open source" as a marketing strategy is the perfect way to drive up the amount of users for your product and leave your competitors reeling.

      Regardless of my opinion on text editors and open source software, I think I am comfortable publicly saying (or typing) that I think Microsoft is just as bad, if not worse, for software and users today, than they were fifteen years ago.

      2 votes
  2. Neverland
    Link
    Partial excerpt:

    Partial excerpt:

    Amid a growing call for regulations to limit the use of facial recognition technology, Microsoft on Friday became the first tech giant to join the chorus.

    In a lengthy blog post about the potential and the risks of facial recognition, Bradford L. Smith, the company’s president, compared the technology to products like medicines and cars that are highly regulated, and he urged Congress to study it and oversee its use.

    “We live in a nation of laws, and the government needs to play an important role in regulating facial recognition technology,” Mr. Smith wrote. He added: “A world with vigorous regulation of products that are useful but potentially troubling is better than a world devoid of legal standards.”

    4 votes