7 votes

How Berlin's Mietskaserne tenements became coveted urban housing

2 comments

  1. weystrom
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    As a tenant of one of these "rentals barracks" I can tell you that they have lots of downsides, so you have to be really rigorous when you check them out. Mine doesn't have an elevator, the inner...

    As a tenant of one of these "rentals barracks" I can tell you that they have lots of downsides, so you have to be really rigorous when you check them out.

    Mine doesn't have an elevator, the inner yard is miserably noisy, because it's closed from 4 sides. Walls are thick, but the floor and ceiling are not, you can hear the neighbors all the time.

    I'm thinking about moving into a freshly-built apartment, but prices in Berlin are sky-rocketing.

    4 votes
  2. Loire
    Link
    Absolutely gorgeous. I wish more North American cities had tenements like this. Funny how desirability changes so much. From working class apartments to, semi-abandoned hovels, to semi-luxurious...

    Absolutely gorgeous. I wish more North American cities had tenements like this.

    Therein lies an ironic reversal. One-hundred years ago, living on the top floor of a Berlin tenement might have been something to hide, a sign of being so poor that you had to accept hauling your groceries and winter coal up six flights of stairs. Nowadays, if you concealed from casual inquirers that you live on a tenement’s top floor, it would more likely be to avoid exposing yourself as a gentrifier.

    Funny how desirability changes so much. From working class apartments to, semi-abandoned hovels, to semi-luxurious upper-middle class apartments all in 140 years, and all within the same structure. It speaks to building for the long term. How many modern apartments can we say will last into the next century?

    2 votes