17 votes

Is ‘Huh?’ a universal word?

3 comments

  1. knocklessmonster (edited ) Link
    "Nah" might be. My brother was playing Runescape, a dude asked him something, he replied "nah," and it blew this Russian player's mind. Dude started typing back in Russian, but they figured out...

    "Nah" might be. My brother was playing Runescape, a dude asked him something, he replied "nah," and it blew this Russian player's mind. Dude started typing back in Russian, but they figured out that it sort of means the same thing in both cultures (American and Russian) with vastly different languages and cultures.

    EDIT: This was off topic, but to explain, it may be that many monosyllabic words, from "huh?" to "no" are somewhat universal.

    6 votes
  2. gyrozeppeli Link
    In Korean it's 엉? or 응?- eong/eung?

    In Korean it's 엉? or 응?- eong/eung?

    5 votes
  3. diode (edited ) Link
    Note, the audio quality in the youtube video is really bad so the various "huh" equivalents probably don't sound like that in real life. I know that at least for me the audio quality was bad...

    Note, the audio quality in the youtube video is really bad so the various "huh" equivalents probably don't sound like that in real life. I know that at least for me the audio quality was bad enough that I couldn't recognize the "huh" equivalent in a language I speak natively.

    2 votes