9 votes

A quite possibly wonderful summer

5 comments

  1. [5]
    Erik
    Link
    I haven't followed COVID super closely, mostly just following guidelines that smarter people have come up with. So maybe someone here can explain: why would families be out traveling this summer...

    I haven't followed COVID super closely, mostly just following guidelines that smarter people have come up with. So maybe someone here can explain: why would families be out traveling this summer when it seems like the timeline for most kids, especially younger kids, won't be until August or September? I know many 16+ will have access by the May to June window Fauci is quoted talking about in this article, but my understanding was that younger children may not be even approved for the vaccine until at least around that time, let alone getting it in their arms.

    Is my knowledge behind on this? Are vaccines going to be approved for children sooner?

    3 votes
    1. [4]
      ChuckS
      Link Parent
      My mom and her husband wanted to take my family (me, wife+kids) and my sister's family (her, husband+kids) to Disney this fall. We didn't feel comfortable, but it was an easy no because "it's...

      My mom and her husband wanted to take my family (me, wife+kids) and my sister's family (her, husband+kids) to Disney this fall. We didn't feel comfortable, but it was an easy no because "it's during school." So they came back and were like, "Well what if we go this summer?" No, stop asking!

      The concern for me isn't even the kids dying. I don't think the kids would die if they caught covid. My concern is the permanent organ damage that seems to happen as a side-effect.

      I could be wrong on this, but I thought covid's symptoms were all basically clotting related: micro-clots form in the blood for whatever reason and start killing whatever's at the other end of the blood vessels they happen to clog up. Again, maybe I'm wrong, but my feeling is that getting my kids a vaccine could help their body fight the coronavirus, and if they can fight it faster then fewer clots would form and they'd be less likely to develop organ damage. Permanent organ damage.

      So no, Disney isn't in the future for us. Our 2020 season tickets to Busch Gardens that we bought in 2019 will have to wait, too. I really, really want to take the kids out and do shit with them but I feel like breaking quarantine a couple months before they could get a vaccine stands a chance of fucking them up for the rest of their life and it's just not a risk I'm willing to take. There's always next year for a family vacation.

      9 votes
      1. Erik
        Link Parent
        Yeah, people seem to myopically focus on the mortality rate when, as you point out, there seems to be a lot more to COVID-19 than just whether or not it kills you. I was even thinking about how...

        Yeah, people seem to myopically focus on the mortality rate when, as you point out, there seems to be a lot more to COVID-19 than just whether or not it kills you. I was even thinking about how future draft prospects in sports may have to prove they never had COVID or if they did, that might make their draft prospects fall. Just an example of just how far reaching this thing could be. Maybe it's not permanent, maybe after years it heals or something. I don't know enough. But I do know that long term damage is happening.

        And also, being sick as a kid is just not fun! I barely remember Disney when my parents took me, but I definitely remember being in hospitals a couple of times (un-diagnosed asthma, bone injury, other things) really well and I didn't like it then and I don't like remembering it!

        I agree with you 100%, why not just wait a few weeks (or months at most) to drastically lower their chance of permanent damage?

        7 votes
      2. [2]
        chrysanth
        Link Parent
        I gotta say, it is really validating to read your comment and know you have the same concerns I have. Some family members called to let us know they'd be visiting us later next month, and that on...

        I gotta say, it is really validating to read your comment and know you have the same concerns I have. Some family members called to let us know they'd be visiting us later next month, and that on the same trip they'd be going to Disney. I told them that this could not happen, it was not safe enough, and that we have a responsibility to discourage family from insisting on ideas like this. Of course, now I'm the bad guy who refused hospitality to family members and doesn't want to see them? It's an awful situation and incredibly frustrating. I want to get out and do stuff too, but I agree with you that the risk right now is just not worth it at all.

        7 votes
        1. ChuckS
          Link Parent
          Thanks, it's nice to get your feedback, too. If my adult family members are getting vaccinated and they're being generally responsible then I'm all for getting together with them, but I don't want...

          Thanks, it's nice to get your feedback, too.

          If my adult family members are getting vaccinated and they're being generally responsible then I'm all for getting together with them, but I don't want to go to large events until my kids are vaccinated, too.

          I don't want to agree to do something months away because I have no idea what the vaccine rollout is going to be like between now and then. My wife and I aren't vaccinated yet and as far as I know there aren't even trials for kids <10 so I can't see my kids getting it any time soon.

          Hang in there. My attitude toward parenting is that I'm not trying to be friends with my kids, I'm trying to make them into thriving adults. I want to be friends, but if I have to decide between being the bad guy or building bad habits, I'll be the bad guy. It sucks at times but I'm doing it for them.

          And if I'm willing to tell my kids no about it then everyone else can pound salt.

          6 votes