7 votes

Venezuela crisis: Russia condemns bid to 'usurp power' from Maduro

4 comments

  1. [3]
    pleure Link
    Maduro isn't good but I guarantee a US-backed coup is going to be much, much worse. I pray this doesn't turn into another Chile.

    Maduro isn't good but I guarantee a US-backed coup is going to be much, much worse. I pray this doesn't turn into another Chile.

    8 votes
    1. [2]
      clerical_terrors Link Parent
      That does seem what the US wants though, and it's poised to take advantage of the situation, and I can't really blame them from a strategical perspective. It's been among the few countries in the...

      That does seem what the US wants though, and it's poised to take advantage of the situation, and I can't really blame them from a strategical perspective. It's been among the few countries in the South American region to openly defy it's hegemony and with Brazil falling under the sway of a right-wing government it seems like they can finally accomplish what they were so desperate to do during the cold war.

      And the fact that Maduro is now getting support from Russia, a country that is very interested in deflating the US' international power, only kinda seems to reinforce the idea that this is a strategic concern for the US.

      1 vote
      1. deciduous Link Parent
        This is not some happenstance situation turned fortunate for the US. The US government has taken numerous actions against Venezuela going back to 2014. This entire crisis is partially manufactured...

        This is not some happenstance situation turned fortunate for the US. The US government has taken numerous actions against Venezuela going back to 2014. This entire crisis is partially manufactured by the US and it's allies and exactly what they intended all along.

        5 votes
  2. dubteedub Link
    Here is an interesting perspective on why Russia is favoring Maduro in this instance. Russia spent billions to build influence in Venezuela. Now it faces a bet gone bad.

    Here is an interesting perspective on why Russia is favoring Maduro in this instance.

    Even by Russian standards, it was a day of furious commentary casting the United States as the sinister puppeteer illegally fomenting regime change around the world. But behind the outrage lay an uncomfortable reality: A multibillion-dollar bet on building Russian influence in Latin America suddenly looked like it could quickly go bad.

    Dmitry Rozental, a scholar at the Latin America Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, said further instability could increase the risk that Russia will lose a total investment in the Venezuelan economy he estimated at close to $25 billion. If opposition leader Juan Guaidó — whom the United States on Wednesday recognized as interim president — gains power, Rozental said, then political and military contacts between Moscow and Caracas would be sure to decrease.

    As The Washington Post’s Anthony Faiola and Karen DeYoung reported last month, Russian President Vladimir Putin in recent years became Venezuela’s patron — and poked a stick in the eye of the United States along the way. In exchange for loans and bailouts, Russia now owns significant parts of at least five oil fields in Venezuela, which holds the world’s largest reserves, along with 30 years’ worth of future output from two Caribbean natural gas fields.