8 votes

New ‘warshipping’ technique gives hackers access to enterprise offices

3 comments

  1. rmgr Link
    I think this is a really cool, novel idea. How effective it is in the real world I'd be skeptical of, but it's definitely something to think about!

    I think this is a really cool, novel idea. How effective it is in the real world I'd be skeptical of, but it's definitely something to think about!

    1 vote
  2. [2]
    chembliss Link
    This is cool, it's like if it were some parasite. I'm curious about how would the attackers go about making difficult for the attack to be detected and/or traced back to them. If the device has to...

    This is cool, it's like if it were some parasite. I'm curious about how would the attackers go about making difficult for the attack to be detected and/or traced back to them. If the device has to be connected to a server, wouldn't that make it this attack relatively easy to detect? And once detected, in which ways could they obfuscate the origin of the attack?

    1 vote
    1. rmgr Link Parent
      I guess you could put a false return address on it to try and mitigate something finding where it came from. In terms of connecting to a server, you could always configure it to relay data through...

      I guess you could put a false return address on it to try and mitigate something finding where it came from. In terms of connecting to a server, you could always configure it to relay data through a hidden service on TOR or something to hide where the information is going.

      I think the idea is this thing brings its own 3G connection so it would be passively scoping your network out which would make it harder to detect.

      1 vote