10 votes

Enhancements to tracking protection in Safari: full third-party cookie blocking, 7-day cap on script-writeable storage, and more

4 comments

  1. [4]
    ThatFanficGuy
    Link
    I'm pretty sure this fucks up my goal of bringing Intergrid to Apple users. An app that only keeps your data for 7 days of no use is a terrible fucking app. Do I have any options to keep my...

    deleting all of a website’s script-writable storage after seven days of Safari use without user interaction on the site

    I'm pretty sure this fucks up my goal of bringing Intergrid to Apple users. An app that only keeps your data for 7 days of no use is a terrible fucking app.

    Do I have any options to keep my storage more permanent? I'm looking into the File System API, but it appears to be at best incomplete. I think I'd be even more okay with a local-file DB, given how it more clearly enables integration with Indigrid, should this ever be a thing.

    3 votes
    1. Wes
      Link Parent
      Yes, this is absurd. Apple has become so tunnel blind by tracking fears they're now breaking essential browser functionality. Progress Web Apps can not function without a reliable LocalStorage....

      Yes, this is absurd. Apple has become so tunnel blind by tracking fears they're now breaking essential browser functionality. Progress Web Apps can not function without a reliable LocalStorage. It's like declaring your home folder as /temp.

      This means that now companies will have to build an app instead of a website, which maybe was Apple's intention all along.

      As for me, I will just say "too bad" to Safari users.

      2 votes
    2. [2]
      Deimos
      Link Parent
      Here's an article about this today: Private client-side-only PWAs are hard, but now Apple made them impossible
      1. ThatFanficGuy
        Link Parent
        This sort of isolationist policy has been ramping up in effect for a while, hasn't it? I'm assuming Andre is right and it's about Apple protecting its app store, which they also rigorously control...

        This sort of isolationist policy has been ramping up in effect for a while, hasn't it? I'm assuming Andre is right and it's about Apple protecting its app store, which they also rigorously control with web developer licenses and extensive moderation.

        Both Andre's post and the one from Aral Balkan that he links to are on the sensationalist, offended side, but they have a kernel of truth between them: this isn't a positive move from Apple's side. This cripples a vital part of the modern Web experience in a way that adds very little benefit. It's like sawing your leg off because bugs can crawl on it.

        Then again, if I had to have a web app, I'd rather millions of users from other platforms were still able to use it. If Apple users have the balls to demand some responsibility from their brand, this can still end up in a better place.

        1 vote