31 votes

This is a solar-powered website, which means it sometimes goes offline ☀

5 comments

  1. [3]
    Thra11
    Link
    I was going to suggest that a number of similar independent sites scattered around the world and connected with something like IPFS (so that during downtime, the other servers which remain up can...

    I was going to suggest that a number of similar independent sites scattered around the world and connected with something like IPFS (so that during downtime, the other servers which remain up can act as a cache) could achieve similar power usage without the downtime.

    I just came across another project using solar powered site hosting with multiple sites so that the location with the most power serves the site.

    8 votes
    1. [2]
      bloup
      Link Parent
      I actually had a similar thought, but personally I think the site packs a lot more "punch" this way. Like the fact that the website goes offline sometimes, and that's okay, is quite a radical...

      I actually had a similar thought, but personally I think the site packs a lot more "punch" this way. Like the fact that the website goes offline sometimes, and that's okay, is quite a radical statement, that forces you to also no longer take the convenience of "always online resources" for granted, and makes you have to think about what it really takes in order to provide that to people.

      13 votes
      1. Thra11
        Link Parent
        Yes. As a piece of art and an experiment designed to provoke thought and conversation, potentially going offline is an interesting part of it. I do like the idea of multiple independent projects...

        Yes. As a piece of art and an experiment designed to provoke thought and conversation, potentially going offline is an interesting part of it.

        I do like the idea of multiple independent projects covering each others downtime, in that it represents a third way of doing things.

        • First, you've got the massive industrial/corporate data centre, where users pay to host their websites
        • Second, you've got things like solar.lowtechmagazine.com which sacrifice some of the features of the first (~100% uptime, etc.) and take things to an extreme level of independence: as long as their ISP, DNS servers/registrar are still there, they'll still be there, dependent only on whether it's been sunny enough recently. One thing I love about this is the accountability: if you have your own server powered solely by a solar panel, you know where your energy is coming from.
        • And then you have a third way, where, by constructing a 'community' that works together, you hopefully gain the high uptime of the datacentre, without being dependent on the large, unaccountable corporations.

        I think this is interesting in that it has many parallels in other areas. For example, in food production, you can just buy all your food in from distant factory farms, or you can grow absolutely everything yourself, or you can choose a third way, where you grow some things yourself and buy/sell/exchange with the community so that everyone gets a varied diet without having to have the extra knowledge, time and equipment required to grow every type of food you want to eat.

        3 votes
  2. eladnarra
    Link
    This is really fascinating, thank you for sharing! I love projects that force you to re-examine something that you took as a given. I'm new to web development, but there's something about static...

    This is really fascinating, thank you for sharing! I love projects that force you to re-examine something that you took as a given.

    I'm new to web development, but there's something about static sites that I really love. Plus I'm a lapsed environmentalist, so I'm sorely tempted to make my own solar powered website... but of course, unless I have a need for a particular website, the most eco-friendly website is one that doesn't exist.

    4 votes