eladnarra's recent activity

  1. Comment on Weekly coronavirus-related chat, questions, and minor updates - week of November 29 in ~health.coronavirus

    eladnarra
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    I'm really not enjoying seeing people getting sick with Omicron despite boosters. I know vaccines are meant to prevent severe cases and hospitalizations, yadda yadda, but some of us are...

    I'm really not enjoying seeing people getting sick with Omicron despite boosters. I know vaccines are meant to prevent severe cases and hospitalizations, yadda yadda, but some of us are chronically ill/disabled and want to avoid getting it altogether because even a mild case may affect us long-term... :(

    How are other folks handling the swinging between "yay we're vaccinated/boosted" and "oh no here comes Delta/Omicron"?

    5 votes
  2. Comment on Desert Bus For Hope 2021 begins in less than six hours in ~tech

  3. Comment on How to save the novel - self-censorship and problematic language in modern fiction in ~books

    eladnarra
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    CW reference to suicide Yeah - and it's also a matter of what percentage of representation is bad/inaccurate. This is true for a lot of identities, but I can speak on disability - it's is rarely...

    CW reference to suicide

    Yeah - and it's also a matter of what percentage of representation is bad/inaccurate. This is true for a lot of identities, but I can speak on disability - it's is rarely seen in media, and often when it is it's portrayed as a tragedy or an obstacle to be overcome (or fake). There's a reason strangers are comfortable telling wheelchair users that'd they'd kill themselves if they ended up in a wheelchair, or think nothing of yelling at a wheelchair user because they stood up briefly. These stereotypes are ingrained and constantly reinforced, and they affect how disabled folks are treated.

    4 votes
  4. Comment on How to save the novel - self-censorship and problematic language in modern fiction in ~books

    eladnarra
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    I feel like I have a very different idea of what sensitivity reading does - I'm not surprised that they "missed" the joke. Sensitivity reading is usually more focused on stereotypes and inaccurate...

    I feel like I have a very different idea of what sensitivity reading does - I'm not surprised that they "missed" the joke. Sensitivity reading is usually more focused on stereotypes and inaccurate representation. When employed by authors, it's not self-censorship- it's just another stage of research, informed by personal experiences that they don't have themselves.

    For example, I recently read a book set partially 1,000 years from now, and the author asked two sensitivity readers to look over her work when disability turned up. Why? Because she wanted to be accurate when describing certain disabilities, and because she was creating a utopia of sorts - so she found it helpful for her accidental biases to be pointed out because they don't exist in her imagined future.

    Is this... Bad? If someone wrote a book that portrayed my illness, I would hope it would be accurate and not perpetuate harmful stereotypes. A character saying that my illness is fake would be realistic - an author validating that opinion in their narration or plot would be extremely harmful. And I don't mean that I would be offended. I mean that it would reinforce a belief that affects patients' ability to access healthcare, find sympathetic friends, and get medical research funded - in real life. I already have to deal with people thinking I'm not really sick because of opinion articles written by psychologists. I'd hate to have to deal with it because a popular book had a character like me that was exposed as "faking it."

    11 votes
  5. Comment on Despite recent advances, disabled people cannot yet participate in society ‘on an equal basis’ with others – and the pandemic has led to many protections being cruelly eroded in ~life

    eladnarra
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    Airplane travel is another area that hasn't really improved much over the years, so disabled people end up having to do a lot of invisible work. Despite calls to improve, air travel is still a...

    Airplane travel is another area that hasn't really improved much over the years, so disabled people end up having to do a lot of invisible work.

    Despite calls to improve, air travel is still a nightmare for many with disabilities

    Airlines still lose, damage or destroy 26 wheelchairs a day--same as when they were first required to start reporting. Breaking a chair is like breaking someone's legs. And for Engracia Figueroa, there were deadly consequences.

    When wheelchairs break, airlines try to avoid replacing them. So very often people have to wait ages for repairs that end up being inadequate; and in this particular case, they did replace the wheelchair eventually, but it was too late to undo the damage of inadequate loaners.

    7 votes
  6. Comment on Despite recent advances, disabled people cannot yet participate in society ‘on an equal basis’ with others – and the pandemic has led to many protections being cruelly eroded in ~life

    eladnarra
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    The concept of invisible labor really resonates. People in chronic illness communities often say that having a chronic illness is like a part-time or a full-time job. Interacting with the medical...

    The concept of invisible labor really resonates. People in chronic illness communities often say that having a chronic illness is like a part-time or a full-time job. Interacting with the medical system can take hours out of your day: coordinating your own care, talking to insurance, dealing with prior authorizations and denials, scheduling appointments, following up on tests, dealing with side effects from medications, correcting medical records...

    And now the pandemic has added to that workload. For example, I have to find a new dentist because the one I've been going to since I was a kid doesn't require masks anymore, and they had nothing to say when I asked about ventilation. If I wasn't sick, maybe I'd risk it; but since I'm relatively high risk I don't fancy spending an hour without a mask in a room that isn't properly ventilated. So now I have to spend a bunch of extra time evaluating other dentist practices, calling them to confirm they still are doing the covid precautions they have listed on their website, get all my records moved over...

    12 votes
  7. Comment on What’s your dream career? in ~talk

    eladnarra
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    Not a true answer, but at the moment? My dream job is not having to have one at all. I could focus on my health, which fell by the wayside with my current work (plus COVID); there are a lot of...

    Not a true answer, but at the moment? My dream job is not having to have one at all. I could focus on my health, which fell by the wayside with my current work (plus COVID); there are a lot of potential diagnoses I'd like to finalize or rule out, and I have at least one surgery in my not so distant future.

    If I wasn't working, I'd have more energy for finishing my web dev certificate. And once I finished, I could work pro bono for small nonprofits and mutual aid groups to make them websites, or to help them make their existing websites fully accessible.

    12 votes
  8. Comment on Facebook - An update on our use of face recognition in ~tech

    eladnarra
    Link Parent
    If the photo is on a private Facebook page, inaccessible to search engines, I don't really see it as an issue. If it's more public, then you should be getting permission to post images of other...

    If the photo is on a private Facebook page, inaccessible to search engines, I don't really see it as an issue. If it's more public, then you should be getting permission to post images of other people anyway, in my opinion. People can recognize you visually, as well.

    Plus, alt text relies on context - if you're just sharing an image with friends, you might write "Me and my boyfriend John on the beach," not "Me, Jane Doe, on the beach with my boyfriend, John Doe." Either the people seeing the picture/hearing the alt text already know who you are, or they don't. The information conveyed visually and through alt text is relatively equivalent.

    So yeah. I wouldn't consider there to be a conflict between alt text and privacy. (There's probably a conflict between privacy and search engines' ability to find people's names on websites and in alt text.)

    2 votes
  9. Comment on Can data die? Why one of the internet's oldest images lives on without its subject's consent in ~tech

    eladnarra
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    Yeah that's a rather odd thing to say - any raster image is a collection of colored pixels. Maybe they mean that it's pixelated?

    Yeah that's a rather odd thing to say - any raster image is a collection of colored pixels. Maybe they mean that it's pixelated?

    3 votes
  10. Comment on Facebook - An update on our use of face recognition in ~tech

    eladnarra
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    Interesting - it's a good move. Sounds like there was a recent settlement/class action lawsuit about it? Shame about how it affects auto alt text, but that's more of an issue with social media not...

    Interesting - it's a good move. Sounds like there was a recent settlement/class action lawsuit about it?

    Shame about how it affects auto alt text, but that's more of an issue with social media not requiring alt text or human intervention in auto alt text. My ideal scenario (if they insist on automation) would be: 1) social media site creates auto alt text, 2) the site shows it to the user before they post and asks them to make edits, with suggestions (such as "it looks like there are people in this photo - if it's important information, you can edit the alt text to include their name and/or description"). Social media platforms could do a lot more to educate users about accessibility and potentially even enforce it.

    1 vote
  11. Comment on The importance of button prompts in ~games.game_design

    eladnarra
    Link Parent
    Yeah, that seems particularly bad. I've played Sea of Thieves, and I assumed my inability to remember which keys to press was because I'm not very good at games... But maybe not!

    Yeah, that seems particularly bad. I've played Sea of Thieves, and I assumed my inability to remember which keys to press was because I'm not very good at games... But maybe not!

    3 votes
  12. Comment on Dave Chappelle willing to discuss ‘The Closer’ with trans community, but says he’s ‘not bending to anybody’s demands’ in ~lgbt

    eladnarra
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    And in fact that's one of the main criticisms I've seen about his special - treating "LGBQT and African American communities in the US" as separate harms Black folks who are LBGTQ.

    And in fact that's one of the main criticisms I've seen about his special - treating "LGBQT and African American communities in the US" as separate harms Black folks who are LBGTQ.

    5 votes
  13. Comment on Margaret Atwood TERF Twitter controversy in ~lgbt

    eladnarra
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    Those types of respectability, "anti-toxic" articles are so hard to fight. It sucks. As soon as you try to refute them, or get a little angry because you're being attacked and/or misrepresented,...

    Those types of respectability, "anti-toxic" articles are so hard to fight. It sucks. As soon as you try to refute them, or get a little angry because you're being attacked and/or misrepresented, woops! You've "proved" them right! You're just an angry activist who shouldn't be listened to, like the article says.

    Totally different topic, but I see it after publication of articles about my chronic illness. (Some doctors who think it is psychogenic call patients "militant activists" for disagreeing.) And after all this time, I don't know how you fight it effectively without getting your words twisted to prove their point. Bad policy and bad science need correcting, but if you're labeled as "bad" for trying to do so, those corrections get dismissed.

    8 votes
  14. Comment on What games have you been playing, and what's your opinion on them? in ~games

    eladnarra
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    I recently got back into Animal Crossing: New Horizons to decorate my island for Halloween, just in time for the final big update and the DLC to be announced. I'm excited, but also very...

    I recently got back into Animal Crossing: New Horizons to decorate my island for Halloween, just in time for the final big update and the DLC to be announced. I'm excited, but also very overwhelmed, haha.

    November 5th Update Spoilers

    I'm looking forward to the quality of life updates from the free update, like more storage space in my house (I'm all out... again) and the ability to access your home storage without going into your house. I'm also thrilled with the idea of being able to visit Harv's Island to see all of the vendors in one place, presumably instead of waiting for them to show up randomly. And I'm going to make a farm! Really pleased my island is unfinished and I have room for new things like that.

    At first I wasn't very excited about the DLC. The idea of making resort homes for other characters just really didn't appeal to me for some reason. Maybe it's the overly capitalistic aspect? Not sure. And then when they started showing the added design tools, I was disappointed that I wouldn't be able to do that on my island. But of course the tools do work on your island (countertops! walls!), and eventually you can even update the houses of your villages on your island! I've been so sad about the boring starter houses my original villagers have, so I guess I'm going to have to get this update!

    2 votes
  15. Comment on What is the easiest, cheapest, most low maintenance pet a person can have? in ~talk

    eladnarra
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    Isopods! Assuming you're not afraid of creatures that look a little like bugs, they're super cute. The different species come in all sorts of colors and patterns. Some look like living fossils,...

    Isopods!

    Assuming you're not afraid of creatures that look a little like bugs, they're super cute. The different species come in all sorts of colors and patterns. Some look like living fossils, and many roll up like armadillos.

    I loved pill bugs (Armadillidium vulgare) as a kid, and they're the species my partner and I recently started with. A friend caught them for us in their yard.

    Cost to get them: free if you find them in your backyard, while starter colonies of a common species/morph can go for around $10-$20.

    You can keep them in a small sterilite container with ventilation holes, and they just need substrate, dry leaves, sphagnum moss, and maybe some cork bark as a hide.

    They're easy to care for, generally. Just need moisture and food every so often, plus a source of calcium. There's also food you can buy for them.

    7 votes
  16. Comment on Weekly coronavirus-related chat, questions, and minor updates - week of October 4 in ~health.coronavirus

    eladnarra
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    I got my high risk booster this morning - haven't noticed any symptoms yet aside from a sore arm (which might just be bruising since they hit a vein). Feeling pretty positive about it. Still nerve...

    I got my high risk booster this morning - haven't noticed any symptoms yet aside from a sore arm (which might just be bruising since they hit a vein).

    Feeling pretty positive about it. Still nerve wracking being indoors with the occasional unmasked person, but hopefully my mask was sufficient. I expected to get quizzed on why I qualified since my partner was last week, but I guess the upside to mobility aids is that they make invisible disabilities more visible, haha.

    Anyone else got their booster?

    3 votes
  17. Comment on The effects of remote work on collaboration among information workers in ~life

    eladnarra
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    Yeah, a lot of these types of analyses seen to go in with assumptions that meetings are better, period. I've been remote for over three years, and it just depends on what you need to accomplish....

    Showing a decrease in meetings and an increase in email and IM may simply indicate a different preference in how people want to communicate. If a meeting can be accomplished in 5 emails instead of one 30 minute block, the method may be less 'rich' but with an increase in total information the total richness of communication may be the same.

    Yeah, a lot of these types of analyses seen to go in with assumptions that meetings are better, period. I've been remote for over three years, and it just depends on what you need to accomplish. Zoom has its place, but so do emails and quick Slack messages.

    Plus, as a disabled person with limited energy who finds talking more tiring than typing, I'm always happy when things aren't meetings.

    7 votes
  18. Comment on What do we do with all this rage? in ~misc

    eladnarra
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    I was wondering something similar the past few days, after reading that thread about r/HermanCainAward. I don't know if I'm angry or not. On the one hand, I have plenty to be angry about. The...

    I was wondering something similar the past few days, after reading that thread about r/HermanCainAward.

    I don't know if I'm angry or not. On the one hand, I have plenty to be angry about.

    1. The people who yell at me on Twitter to "stay home if you're scared" when I talk about how difficult it is being on the higher end of risk for long-term COVID complications.
    2. The state politicians who banned masking in local schools.
    3. The people who are going on vacations and acting like everything is normal while Delta fills hospitals to the brim.
    4. The medical professionals who I have to ask to pull their mask over their nose (in an obgyn practice with pregnant patients, of all places!).
    5. The people, including well-respected doctors and psychiatrists, who are recycling old falsehoods about my chronic illnesses and applying them to long-COVID - it's just deconditioning, it's just depression, it's a "false illness belief" that they're sick when they're not, post-exertional malaise can be fixed by doing the very thing that makes you sicker (exercising), it doesn't affect kids, it's due to being lazy, it's due to being overly perfectionist, they're just anti-psychiatry and don't want to accept they're mentally ill, it's a white and middle class "disease" stemming from hysteria, etc.

    On the other hand, I'm honestly too anxious and exhausted by it all to be angry. (Strong emotions tend to exhaust me, so that's probably a good thing, in a way.) I think for me, if this all eventually ends somehow, I won't be left with a ton of rage - I'll simply be left unable to trust most people. "Hello helpful medical tech. Were you one of the people who would have endangered me by not masking?" "Hello new coworker. Did you get vaccinated, or did you spread misinformation and help contribute to people's deaths?" "Hello friend I haven't talked to since before the pandemic. Did you think COVID wasn't a big deal because only old or sick people (like me) would die?"

    Basically, I no longer trust that people have a bare minimum of care for others, especially for children. As someone who fell ill and became permanently disabled as a teen, I am horrified by how little regard people have for the long-term health of children. And if other folks feel similarly, I can't imagine what that does to a society. How do you live and work and exist in a society where it feels like a large number of people don't care if you or your loved ones die? Where they tell you that to your face?

    13 votes
  19. Comment on Recommend me books with a twist (with a twist) in ~books

    eladnarra
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    Piranesi by Susanna Clarke

    Piranesi by Susanna Clarke

    1 vote
  20. Comment on A doctor who defied Texas' abortion law is sued, launching a legality test of the ban in ~health

    eladnarra
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    Very brave of the doctor and his patient — I know he has a lot of support and did this on purpose, but still. It does make me wonder how much of the patient's identity and medical records will be...

    Very brave of the doctor and his patient — I know he has a lot of support and did this on purpose, but still. It does make me wonder how much of the patient's identity and medical records will be part of proceedings (or not). I hope it'll be a "Jane Doe" situation, for their sake.

    11 votes