eladnarra's recent activity

  1. Comment on Trump vows mass immigration arrests, removals of ‘millions of illegal aliens’ starting next week in ~news

    eladnarra Link Parent
    Thanks! I've voted in every election since I became a citizen, and I actually work in a sector that involves supporting progressive candidates, GOTV efforts, and recruiting people to run for local...

    Thanks! I've voted in every election since I became a citizen, and I actually work in a sector that involves supporting progressive candidates, GOTV efforts, and recruiting people to run for local office. (Trying to be a little vague because I don't want folks to be able to connect this account to my real name that easily.) Things like organizing and going to meetings are beyond my energy capabilities, but I could probably do more in my day-to-day interactions (even if those are mostly online).

    I think part of my helplessness comes from what you describe in your edit. A lot of the strategies to undo these Republican efforts require playing a longer game, and while I can see evidence of it happening with Dems, that sort of eventual, incremental change doesn't help the people being separated from their families now.

    EDIT: just in case, my "thanks" wasn't at all sarcastic! Not sure how it sounds in text, haha.

    2 votes
  2. Comment on Trump vows mass immigration arrests, removals of ‘millions of illegal aliens’ starting next week in ~news

    eladnarra Link
    I feel really helpless with this stuff (which I suppose is the point). People suggest calling representatives, but after the last election all three of mine are solid Republicans who have ignored...

    I feel really helpless with this stuff (which I suppose is the point). People suggest calling representatives, but after the last election all three of mine are solid Republicans who have ignored every wave of outraged phone calls. They don't give a shit, because clearly they can keep getting elected in this state.

    I could donate a little to RAICES I guess. And I went to a small protest last year. But the major direct action we seem to need isn't happening (and might not be possible for me anyway with my health). What else is there to do...?

    6 votes
  3. Comment on Data bleeding everywhere: a story of period trackers in ~tech

    eladnarra Link
    Privacy is a hard thing to balance with period trackers (and other trackers of health-related info). They really are super helpful- every time I go to the doctor and I get asked when my last...

    Privacy is a hard thing to balance with period trackers (and other trackers of health-related info). They really are super helpful- every time I go to the doctor and I get asked when my last period was, all I have to do is open my app. I can mark when I have penetrative sex, so that if I'm late one month I know whether or not I need to think about grabbing a test. And after 3.5 years of tracking, the algorithm is pretty good at figuring out when my next period should be, often within a day or two. But each helpful function requires more data, some of it fairly private.

    [A previous discussion on Tildes about period apps, in case folks are interested: Period-tracking apps are not for women]

    8 votes
  4. Comment on The Worst Patients in the World - The U.S. Leads the World in Healthcare Spending in ~health

    eladnarra Link Parent
    Sorry for the double post, but my brain won't let this article go, haha. Absent any additional info (or better yet, a link to the study), there's no way to determine if this difference is actually...

    Sorry for the double post, but my brain won't let this article go, haha.

    According to another study, this one of chronic migraine sufferers, 42 percent of U.S. respondents had visited an emergency department for their headaches, versus 14 percent of U.K. respondents.

    Absent any additional info (or better yet, a link to the study), there's no way to determine if this difference is actually due to patients themselves or due to the systems they find themselves in. It could be that UK folks have better access to treatments, which keep their condition more stable and less likely to require emergency care. Or it might be that UK patients are more able to go to a doctor's office on short notice instead of the ER. Or maybe the US's overreaction to the opioid epidemic means that many US patients have to resort to going to the ER to get adequate pain meds.

    4 votes
  5. Comment on The Worst Patients in the World - The U.S. Leads the World in Healthcare Spending in ~health

    eladnarra Link
    Eesh. I feel like this is a topic worth discussing, but there must be a different way to approach it than to blame the people shouldering massive healthcare costs. Also, "medically unnecessary...

    Eesh. I feel like this is a topic worth discussing, but there must be a different way to approach it than to blame the people shouldering massive healthcare costs.

    Also, "medically unnecessary tests" feels super vague. Maybe it's better defined in medical literature and research, but in this article it comes across as somewhat meaningless.

    A few years ago I woke up with less sensation in certain parts of my body and back pain. It was a relatively sudden thing, and impacted several areas of my qualify of life. (Being vague because honestly it's tough to talk about and some of it is rather private.) I had a ton of MRIs trying to find something that could be causing it, but my spine looked "great." The only finding was white matter brain lesions, but subsequent MRIs over the years show no increase in lesion load.

    Were all those tests medically unnecessary because no one found a cause of my symptoms? Are my yearly brain MRIs pointless because I don't have an MS diagnosis and the lesion load hasn't increased? Rare and poorly understood/defined illnesses can often involve multiple tests to rule out other conditions, and some conditions (like my main illness, CFS) don't even have a direct test. I fear that negative results on tests could be interpreted as those tests being unnecessary, when that negative result is important. It's good to know that I don't appear to have MS, even if that doesn't tell me why I lose sensation or have pain.

    It's also worth discussing whether or not lowered costs should be a goal of Medicare for All (or another similar plan). The techniques used to lower costs (step therapy, drug formularies, prior authorization, etc) often hurt chronically ill/disabled people with complex needs. It happens in other countries (if you read accounts from disabled folks in Canada, for example), and it happens already in the US. Medicine is highly complex, and folks with multiple conditions often require unique treatment strategies, and doctors already spend countless hours arguing with Medicare/Medicaid/private insurance trying to get medically necessary treatments covered.

    This is a good thread from Matthew Cortland, a disabled lawyer who is on SSI/Medicaid and regularly has to use his law degree to get his meds. It begins:

    Have we considered the possibility that, 'no, actually, reducing overall health expenditures shouldn't be the aim of universal healthcare'? 'Reducing total cost' is repeatedly cited as an aim of #MedicareForAll, but here's why I'm not at all convinced that should be our goal...

    6 votes
  6. Comment on Two-hour ‘dose’ of nature significantly boosts health – study in ~science

    eladnarra (edited ) Link
    Experimental Design From the paper: I haven't read many research papers since I graduated, and in my classes we never really dived into statistical analysis or critiquing experimental design, so I...

    Experimental Design
    From the paper:

    Exposure was defined in terms of the self-reported minutes spent in natural environments for recreation in the last seven days; and outcomes were self-reported health and subjective well-being.

    I haven't read many research papers since I graduated, and in my classes we never really dived into statistical analysis or critiquing experimental design, so I may be way off base, but this struck me as a bit odd.

    That the “threshold” was also present for those with long-term illnesses/disability, suggests that the positive overall association in the data was not simply due to healthier people visiting nature more often.

    This is what concerns me about the design. I have a long-term illness/disability, and if I was asked during a flare how much I'd been in nature the previous week, my answer would be 0 hours- because I'd been too sick to get out of the house. And obviously I'd say my health was poor and I felt down, because feeling too sick to get out of the house sucks. On the other hand, if I was asked during a really, really good week, I might make it to 120 minutes total if I added up my walks. I'd probably still say my overall health was poor, but since I was feeling good that week my answer about feelings of well-being would probably be higher.

    They seem to be relying somewhat on this particular aspect:

    Two further control variables were particularly important. First, the survey asked: ‘Do you have any long standing illness, health problem or disability that limits your daily activities or the kind of work you can do?’ (‘Restricted functioning’: Yes; No = ref). Including this variable, at least in part, controls for reverse causality. If similar associations between nature exposure and health and well-being are found for both those with and without restricted functioning, this would support the notion that the associations are not merely due to healthier, more mobile people visiting nature more often.

    I feel like this doesn't properly account for people with variable conditions like mine, and also assumes that everyone who is disabled has the same type/level of disability. An otherwise healthy person who uses a wheelchair because of a spine injury might identify themselves as disabled in the survey but answer high on the wellbeing questions, and also be able to get out in nature more easily than a housebound person who says they have poor health and wellbeing. So seeing an association between time in nature and wellbeing in the disabled population could simply be due to the variability of disabilities and how they impact someone's ability to be in nature more often.

    So basically I'm wondering if anyone has insight into what I'm missing- my assumption is that because I don't have any experience with real-life experimental design, I don't understand how statistical analysis accounts for this sort of thing. I know that there is other research into this area, so I'm not actually skeptical that nature has a positive impact on various health metrics; I just don't quite understand how this particular study works to support that hypothesis.

    Edit: fixed "hours" to "minutes." Units matter :D

    2 votes
  7. Comment on Two-hour ‘dose’ of nature significantly boosts health – study in ~science

    eladnarra Link
    The actual paper: Spending at least 120 minutes a week in nature is associated with good health and wellbeing I posted the article and not the paper, despite the article implying causation when...

    The actual paper: Spending at least 120 minutes a week in nature is associated with good health and wellbeing

    I posted the article and not the paper, despite the article implying causation when the paper says "associated," because I'm interested in what folks think about the difference between the two - do you think the article overstates the study's findings?

    I'm also interested in hearing people's thoughts about the experimental design, but I think I'll put that in another comment because it got quite long.

    1 vote
  8. Comment on Comment vote counts are now visible again in ~tildes.official

    eladnarra Link
    I felt more of an obligation to reply to people, which I didn't like. Whereas with votes I might just like a reply if I didn't have much to add, when votes weren't visible I felt bad not having a...

    I felt more of an obligation to reply to people, which I didn't like. Whereas with votes I might just like a reply if I didn't have much to add, when votes weren't visible I felt bad not having a way to be like "hey I read this." (Of course, no one knows I voted for their reply, so maybe it feels the same to them...)

    6 votes
  9. Comment on Now that E3 is over, which games are you most excited about? in ~games

    eladnarra Link
    Haven't seen everything there is to see, but my list so far: Games I'd Like to Play BOTW2 (... once I've played BOTW) 12 Minutes Fallen Order Spiritfarer Way to the Woods The Outer Worlds...

    Haven't seen everything there is to see, but my list so far:

    Games I'd Like to Play

    • BOTW2 (... once I've played BOTW)
    • 12 Minutes
    • Fallen Order
    • Spiritfarer
    • Way to the Woods
    • The Outer Worlds
    • Superliminal

    Games I'll Probably Watch Other People Play

    • Doom Eternal
    • Watch Dogs 3
    • Deathloop
    • Ghostwriter Tokyo

    I'm not great at fast-paced games with combat, although I can enjoy them, so that's where the main distinction lies. (Star Wars in an exception. I'll find the easy setting and try my best to mow down Empire soldiers just so I can experience my cute little droid friend and get to wield a lightsaber.)

    With the newly-released Outer Wilds (which I still need to start) plus Deathloop and 12 Minutes, I'm really enjoying seeing time travel/time loop mechanics showing up in video games.

    3 votes
  10. Comment on What is a contradiction or dissonance you live with on a regular basis? in ~talk

    eladnarra Link Parent
    A lot of articles recommend starting with a day or two per week. It seems like a good idea for learning recipes and getting used to it, and it has the benefit of cutting back on environmental...

    A lot of articles recommend starting with a day or two per week. It seems like a good idea for learning recipes and getting used to it, and it has the benefit of cutting back on environmental impact even if you don't start doing it every day. It doesn't quite work for the moral arguments, though... either it's ethical or it isn't, and if it isn't then forgoing meat a few times a week doesn't really work.

    2 votes
  11. Comment on What is a contradiction or dissonance you live with on a regular basis? in ~talk

    eladnarra Link Parent
    I wouldn't be surprised if this was the case for some folks. I have to say, I sometimes feel a bit defensive when participating in conversations about vegetarianism/veganism. (I don't lash out...

    I wouldn't be surprised if this was the case for some folks. I have to say, I sometimes feel a bit defensive when participating in conversations about vegetarianism/veganism. (I don't lash out because of that defensiveness, though, just make self-deprecating jokes about how hypocritical I am.)

    4 votes
  12. Comment on Workers With Disabilities Are Making Cents Per Hour — and It’s Legal in ~life

    eladnarra Link Parent
    Yeah, I get what you're saying - I just think it's morally wrong to say "because this person is disabled and not as fast as X job, we're going to pay them less than the minimum wage that abled...

    Yeah, I get what you're saying - I just think it's morally wrong to say "because this person is disabled and not as fast as X job, we're going to pay them less than the minimum wage that abled people must be paid." Either it's a minimum wage, or it isn't. Subminimum wage devalues the time that disabled people put into these jobs, portrays their contributions to society as lesser, and also brings down everyone else's wages. The benefits from working can be found elsewhere, in ways that don't benefit corporations (and CEOS making $700,000 a year) at the expense of disabled people.

    On a personal note, I can only work part time because of a disability. (And I don't qualify for benefits.) I don't think this makes me inherently unworthy of a living wage, but I'm unable to make enough to support myself because in our current system part time hours = part time pay = less than what someone would make in a full-time job at minimum wage. I recognize that the nature of my disability puts me in a different situation than folks with developmental/intellectual disabilities, and I know some disabled people like these programs, but I formed these opinions based on the advocacy of disabled activists (and a little of my own experiences). I support a system that values people's work and also ensures everyone has enough to live comfortably, whether capable of work or not. It's a pipe dream, sure, but a good start would be making sure folks currently making subminimum wages (prisoners, disabled people, etc) are no longer being exploited, and increasing SSI so people aren't stuck in poverty.

    3 votes
  13. Comment on Workers With Disabilities Are Making Cents Per Hour — and It’s Legal in ~life

    eladnarra Link Parent
    It all comes down to whether one considers simply having a job, however menial or unimportant to the employer, is worth getting paid less than $1/hour. I don't think that having a job is...

    You can even see it in other anecdotes here. Many of the jobs do not exactly produce significant value to the business. It's often stuff like stacking boxes, collecting letters, organizing papers. Stuff that could be automated, or just handled by a full time employee on the side.

    It all comes down to whether one considers simply having a job, however menial or unimportant to the employer, is worth getting paid less than $1/hour. I don't think that having a job is inherently better than not having one when the job itself is exploitative. Pay disabled people enough so that they can actually use that money for things that matter in their lives, or make sure they're getting enough benefits from the government. (Or ideally, both.)

    One avenue that could help this is tax breaks or subsidies for companies to take in disabled, but in America that seems unlikely to pass.

    There are already some. Or did you have something different in mind?

    2 votes
  14. Comment on What is a contradiction or dissonance you live with on a regular basis? in ~talk

    eladnarra Link Parent
    Yeah, I'm not entirely opposed to eating meat, and I don't have a fully formed view of the issue. Perhaps it isn't unethical, or at least is less unethical, in the type of scenario you describe....

    Yeah, I'm not entirely opposed to eating meat, and I don't have a fully formed view of the issue. Perhaps it isn't unethical, or at least is less unethical, in the type of scenario you describe. I'm also not the type of person who would disparage others for hunting for food (see my Inuit comment). And I'm well aware that some folks will probably always need meat for medical reasons.

    The idea that we'd be depriving an animal of a life if we didn't raise it for food is interesting. I guess it depends on how morally bad you consider not existing is. (I think that's a fairly neutral thing; there's no suffering from not existing.) It also depends on how highly you value animal life. If you're one of the people that considers other mammal life as valuable as a human life, the idea is abhorrent no matter how good their lives are. We wouldn't deliberately have human babies, raise them with good lives, and then eat them (or use them for medical experiments, or whatever).

    The carnivorous/omnivorous animal argument is actually one I stopped believing as a result of the ethics class I took. We could argue for a number of unethical practices (like infanticide) by pointing to mammals that engage in a similar behavior, so whether or not something is found in nature doesn't inherently say anything about an action's morality (to me).

    I also don't think that just because we previously ate meat and that could have contributed to our increased cognitive ability means that we necessarily have a moral argument to keep eating meat- after all, we're now able to use that cognitive ability to think about and discuss these sorts of issues, and potentially come up with alternatives.

    7 votes
  15. Comment on What is a contradiction or dissonance you live with on a regular basis? in ~talk

    eladnarra Link
    I came to the conclusion during an ethics class that eating meat is probably unethical in a lot of scenarios.* But I still eat it, albeit probably less than the average American. It was weird to...

    I came to the conclusion during an ethics class that eating meat is probably unethical in a lot of scenarios.* But I still eat it, albeit probably less than the average American.

    It was weird to come to that conclusion and not change my behavior, but for now that's just where my life is. I live at home and rely on others to cook my meals (because of health/energy limitations). And when I tried to eat even more vegetarian meals than I already do, I noticed I didn't feel as good. That may have been a coincidence, but I'm very hesitant to do things that could throw my body off more than it already is.

    *Some people need meat for health/dietary reasons, and expecting indigenous people (like the Inuit) to give up part of their culture would be... More wrong? To me.

    31 votes
  16. Comment on Workers With Disabilities Are Making Cents Per Hour — and It’s Legal in ~life

    eladnarra Link Parent
    I think that companies should pay at least minimum wage, whatever the productivity level of the disabled person. (If companies still need incentives from the government, that aspect is possible to...

    I think that companies should pay at least minimum wage, whatever the productivity level of the disabled person. (If companies still need incentives from the government, that aspect is possible to continue without exploitation.)

    People's productivity varies. When you're getting over a cold you might be a bit slower at your job, but your employer can't decide to pay you less than minimum wage for that day. Disabled people's time spent at work is just as valuable, and as seen in @sublime_aenima's
    comment, the system for determining productivity is often broken anyway.

    6 votes
  17. Comment on Workers With Disabilities Are Making Cents Per Hour — and It’s Legal in ~life

    eladnarra Link
    This is a great overview of this issue, thanks for posting! It covers a lot of ground, and I'm going to keep it handy for the next discussion I have about the subminimum wage. One aspect that I...

    This is a great overview of this issue, thanks for posting! It covers a lot of ground, and I'm going to keep it handy for the next discussion I have about the subminimum wage.

    One aspect that I didn't see mentioned was that relatively often parents of disabled adults are actually in favor of sheltered workshops. It seems counterintuitive that they'd support a system where corporations take advantage of their children, but I've heard a few of their arguments (which hopefully I'm remembering correctly):

    1. "Jobs like these give my child something meaningful to do during the day. If companies had to pay a full wage, they wouldn't hire people like my child."
    2. "If my child made more money, they'd lose their SSI/Medicare."

    I think the first argument falls into the trap of valuing paid work over other experiences - surely developmentally/intellectually disabled adults could find enjoyment and social interaction in other contexts that don't exploit them, if we as a society made them available.

    And while it's true that some people (disabled or not) do find meaning in paid work, the fact that CEOS can make such salaries indicates that the disabled employees could (and should) be paid more.

    As for the second argument, it is true that people on SSI have limits to what they can earn/save. The solution there is to raise those limits — currently people on SSI get less than the federal poverty level per year in benefits and can't save more than $2000 (unless they have an ABLE account, which has limitations).

    6 votes
  18. Comment on Getting Rich: from Zero to Hero in One Blog Post in ~life

    eladnarra Link Parent
    Thanks - yeah, it is frustrating. I totally appreciate this type of advice and understand how it can help a lot of people, but from my personal perspective it feels like an individual solution to...

    Thanks - yeah, it is frustrating. I totally appreciate this type of advice and understand how it can help a lot of people, but from my personal perspective it feels like an individual solution to a systemic problem. That's not bad in and of itself, but it's not sufficient either :)

    1 vote
  19. Comment on U.S. Requiring Social Media Information From Visa Applicants, Permanent Residents And Naturalized Citizens in ~news

    eladnarra (edited ) Link
    I feel like this tildes title is a bit... misleading. The visa requirement is bad, don't get me wrong, but I clicked on the link thinking it suddenly applied to me, too. But the permanent resident...

    I feel like this tildes title is a bit... misleading. The visa requirement is bad, don't get me wrong, but I clicked on the link thinking it suddenly applied to me, too. But the permanent resident and naturalized citizen part only seems to refer to this:

    The move represents a step up from a September 2017 measure in which the Homeland Security Department proposed and enacted a regulation calling for the surveillance of social media use of all immigrants, including naturalized citizens.

    Which, while also troubling, isn't the same thing as calling up naturalized citizens and demanding their social media info. Did I miss something? (Asking seriously, would like to know if I'm going to have to remember every social media account I used the past 5 years.)