Seven's recent activity

  1. Comment on What's a song you enjoy listening to from a genre you don't? in ~music

    Seven
    Link Parent
    Wow, thanks! I'll definitely be trying all of those out soon! I'm always looking for new stuff to listen to, so you've definitely given me a lot to work with.

    Wow, thanks! I'll definitely be trying all of those out soon! I'm always looking for new stuff to listen to, so you've definitely given me a lot to work with.

    1 vote
  2. Comment on What's a song you enjoy listening to from a genre you don't? in ~music

    Seven
    Link Parent
    I just started listening to the Katamari Damacy soundtrack lately too! Do you have any suggestions as to what I should listen to next?

    I just started listening to the Katamari Damacy soundtrack lately too! Do you have any suggestions as to what I should listen to next?

    2 votes
  3. Comment on Why do so few people major in computer science? in ~tech

    Seven
    Link
    I'm currently a 3rd year Computer Science student, so I'd like to share what anecdotal insights I can. 1. Computer Science is hard. From my experience, this hasn't been true, at least not nearly...

    I'm currently a 3rd year Computer Science student, so I'd like to share what anecdotal insights I can.

    1. Computer Science is hard.
    From my experience, this hasn't been true, at least not nearly to the extent other subjects are hard. I have friends whose majors are bioengineering, music, math, religion, and all other types of sciences and liberal arts majors, and I can tell you that they all have a much more difficult course-/workloads than I do. I have spoken to my close friends in computer science, and they agree: comp sci is just easier than other programs at my university. This could just be indicative of the difficulty of the workload and not that of the material itself, but the way I see it, comp sci does not have the memorization/study requirement of the sciences, it does not have any long hours spent on lab work, and does not have the grueling hours and hours of classes a practices required for a music degree. There is little to no reading of textbooks, as everything can be found and referenced online. I have very few exams, instead having a large number of team and individual projects, most of which take only a few days to complete. Overall, although there might be the perception generally that CS is hard, that has not been my perception.

    3. People aren’t so market-driven when they’re considering majors.
    I think this is the point I most agree with. Pretty much no one I know considered earning potential at all when choosing a major. All of my friends--including me--chose their majors because it's what they're passionate about: what they wanted to do. I think the most glaring failing in the author's assumptions comes from the statement, "I think that people who go to college decide on what to major in significantly based on two factors: earning potential and whether a field is seen as high-status." I have never found that to be true, either in high school or now when speaking to my peers about their choices. When I chose CS, the fact that the field was high-earning just seemed like a good bonus to me, and was never an actual motivation for me to choose CS as a career.

    5. Anti-women culture.
    This is certainly a factor. There are very few women in my current CS classes, probably only 15-25% at a quick estimate. However, I have not noticed any discrimination or a hostile learning environment for these women, but then again, I am not a woman, so take my experience in this area with a grain of salt.

    6. Reactionary faculty.
    I have never seen any of the faculty at my school see CS as a "lovely, pure, scholarly field." I have never felt any degree of gatekeeping in CS by the faculty during my time at university. On the contrary, there has always been a great balance between theory and practical application in my experience.

    7. Anti-nerd culture.
    Anti-nerd culture is certainly a thing of the past. Things such as Star Wars, comic books, superheroes, and video games are now part of the cultural mainstream. The idea of "nerds" in and of itself is truly a thing of the past, something only kept alive by the likes of The Big Bang Theory, and people who knew nerds when they were young but have no idea of the true realities of the current culture of the youth today.

    10. Psychological burn from the dotcom bubble.
    I didn't even know what the dotcom bubble was until I learned about it in a Company Man video about AOL that I watched a week ago, so I certainly don't think that's a factor. I've never heard anyone talking about the dotcom bubble in my search for an internship, nor have I heard any discussion about it when discussing the CS industry in other contexts.

    Responding to some other comments I've seen here, I can say that my fellow CS students are not competitive in the slightest, and are never reluctant to help out fellow students. Although we aren't the closest-knit of communities on campus (I am always amazed at how close all the music majors are), we're friendly enough to each other, and no spirit of competition exists at all. Overall, I think the CS environment has changed for the better quite recently, perhaps more recently than we have data for.

    In terms of why I think that there are so few CS majors, I would say that it has to do with the name: Computer Science. Most people don't live their lives online, and only use computers briefly as a tool. They don't customize their workflows, they don't even know what Linux is, and they still have the Windows Store pinned to their taskbar. They don't use their PC all that often, so the idea of working with computers as a career causes most people to balk at the idea. While, fundamentally, CS is about the theory and software development and all that, it requires a distinct interest in Computers as a whole. I think that most people don't want to live their lives at a computer, and CS is the only major where that is guaranteed.

    6 votes
  4. Comment on Recommend classic games you feel everyone should play at least once in ~games

    Seven
    Link
    I really suggest Doom 1 and 2. They still are super fun and don't feel outdated at all. I've been playing on the Switch port which has some nice QOL stuff, but other versions are great too.

    I really suggest Doom 1 and 2. They still are super fun and don't feel outdated at all. I've been playing on the Switch port which has some nice QOL stuff, but other versions are great too.

    17 votes
  5. Comment on How to serve three terms as President in ~misc

    Seven
    Link
    Always good to see a LegalEagle video.

    Always good to see a LegalEagle video.

    3 votes
  6. Comment on Project Sandcastle: Android for the iPhone in ~comp

  7. Comment on Castlevania: Symphony of the Night released for iOS and Android for US $3 in ~games

    Seven
    Link Parent
    What do you mean by "deserves better"?

    What do you mean by "deserves better"?

    1 vote
  8. Comment on Flat-Earther ‘Mad’ Mike Hughes dies in rocket ride above California desert in ~news

    Seven
    Link Parent
    I mean in my opinion, it doesn't really matter what he actually believes. He's promoting the same nonsense as the rest of them, so the effect is the same in my eyes.

    I mean in my opinion, it doesn't really matter what he actually believes. He's promoting the same nonsense as the rest of them, so the effect is the same in my eyes.

    29 votes
  9. Comment on 95th percentile isn't that good in ~life

    Seven
    Link
    Okay so I have a ton of experience with Overwatch, so I can pretty much only speak to the points about that that the author makes. I spent two years playing Overwatch semi-competitively at the...

    Okay so I have a ton of experience with Overwatch, so I can pretty much only speak to the points about that that the author makes. I spent two years playing Overwatch semi-competitively at the platinum/diamond level, and I can tell you that there are thousands of committed players that are doing all the things that he says lead to success. Everyone playing tournaments and pick-up-games are entirely dedicated to improvement, get constant feedback from both their peers and professional coaches (I, for example, have had my VODs reviewed by at least three separate professional OW /coaches), and play the game for over 20 hours a week, yet still do not improve for the most part. In the 11 months I was on my Overwatch team, the average player moved from high platinum to low diamond. This is not the 95th percentile success that the author implies will happen. It is clear that the author does not actually understand much about how to improve in OW (likely due to having a lot of experience with other FPS's and being able to climb quickly due to talent, existing aim ability, etc). This is particularly evident when he speaks about the forums (which is known not to be representative of the community at large), when he says that OW players who want to improve don't get feedback, and most shockingly says that "Overwatch provides the tools to make it relatively easy to get feedback," which is unequivocally false. There is absolutely no system in place to get VODs reviewed, get decent feedback from professionals, or make standing teams to participate in tournaments. All of that has to be sought out by the player, and it is pretty hard to find those resources, although they are growing. Perhaps his most heinous statement was this: "when you can get to 95%-ile by fixing mistakes like "not realizing that you should stand on the objective", you don't really need a lot of talent to get to 95%-ile." It shows a complete misunderstanding of the problems facing the middle tiers of Overwatch and demonstrates that the author has no understanding of even the least complex aspects of the game. Honestly, it seems that the author has hardly played Overwatch at all. I would be interested to look at his career profile and win statistics.

    Looking at the appendix, the list of "things you'll regularly see at slightly above 50%-ile" just comes off as a laundry list of things he's seen one or two people a week do and attributes it to the whole playerbase at that Elo. It honestly just sounds like a person who believes that he's "too good to be in plat," so insults all his teammates with these surface-level observations without actually understanding the true depth of the game. The rest of of the appendix continues to just be the author listing things he's seen people in plat do and complaining about it, all with a lot of elitism and a holier-than-thou attitude throughout.

    The phrase "It's generally not too hard to fix these since the mistakes are like the example above: simple enough that once you see that you're making the mistake, the fix is straightforward because the mistake is straightforward" is just so inane and out of touch that I don't even know where to start.

    I've never read anything by this guy before, but I definitely do not want to read anything by him again. To me, he seems elitist, self-indulgent, and entirely unaware of the problems that others might have.

    4 votes
  10. Comment on Windows 7 support has ended in ~tech

    Seven
    Link Parent
    Even for products with lifetime guarantees, let's take Craftsman tools for example, it would seem that by OP's logic, that would not be enough. OP does not simply want the tool to be replaced for...

    Even for products with lifetime guarantees, let's take Craftsman tools for example, it would seem that by OP's logic, that would not be enough. OP does not simply want the tool to be replaced for free with a newer tool, they want their existing tool to be constantly maintained and repaired for the entire time they wish to use the product. To me, it seems to be an unrealistic expectation of the developers of the software/product to provide nonstop support for an outdated and, frankly, technologically worse older product when there is a newer, more advanced product available for free.

    5 votes
  11. Comment on How I get by: A week in the life of a McDonald’s cashier in ~life

    Seven
    Link
    Maybe this isn't the right place for this, but doesn't the presence of the tag "modern slavery" kind of bring a bit of inherent bias into this post? Like the article doesn't use the term and...

    Maybe this isn't the right place for this, but doesn't the presence of the tag "modern slavery" kind of bring a bit of inherent bias into this post? Like the article doesn't use the term and mentions nothing about slavery at all. I'm just kind of worried that by adding such opinions into the tags, a user may perceive that the subject of modern slavery is addressed in the article, which it isn't; it is simply the opinion of the OP that the subject matter of the article is akin to "modern slavery." It seems like very mild editorializing, which I don't think is something that we want here on Tildes (apart from comments, of course).

    By the way, I personally agree that this article's subject matter is akin to modern slavery, I just don't think it should be in the tags.

    10 votes
  12. Comment on Banana duct-taped to a wall has sold for $120,000 in ~arts

    Seven
    Link Parent
    The art isn't in the banana itself, it's in the action of displaying the banana and acting as if it is art. Even the fact that we're talking about the limits and intricacies of modern art right...

    The art isn't in the banana itself, it's in the action of displaying the banana and acting as if it is art. Even the fact that we're talking about the limits and intricacies of modern art right now proves that the piece has done its job in stirring up a discussion about art. It's like Duchamp's "Fountain". The art is not inherent to the object itself, it's in the act of treating it as art.

    4 votes
  13. Comment on Go grandmaster Lee Se-Dol retires saying artificial intelligence cannot be defeated in ~games

    Seven
    Link
    I feel like he's missing the point of why we as humans play games at all. Sure, no human will probably ever be able to beat AlphaGo again, but that isn't why we play or watch games. Being the best...

    I feel like he's missing the point of why we as humans play games at all. Sure, no human will probably ever be able to beat AlphaGo again, but that isn't why we play or watch games. Being the best in the world at something isn't always the most interesting thing about watching someone play a game. A lightweight boxer, for example, still enjoys boxing, not because he is the best in the world at boxing as a whole, but because it is interesting to play and watch the narratives that take place in lower levels in boxing. Just because no one can beat AlphaGo doesn't mean that being the best human in the world at Go isn't still incredibly interesting. College basketball is still interesting despite knowing that the top teams in the college leagues couldn't beat the top teams in the NBA.

    13 votes
  14. Comment on What Breath Of The Wild is like for someone who doesn't play games in ~games

    Seven
    Link Parent
    You might like the channel Girlfriend Reviews then. Basically this but entirely from the point of the wife (or in this case, girlfriend). A lot of the videos are just about the experience of...

    You might like the channel Girlfriend Reviews then. Basically this but entirely from the point of the wife (or in this case, girlfriend). A lot of the videos are just about the experience of watching someone else play the game tho.

    6 votes
  15. Comment on The flat-Earth conspiracy is spreading around the globe. Does it hide a darker core? in ~humanities

    Seven
    Link Parent
    I've heard that that's the way the flat earth movement started. Just a bunch of people doing it as a joke, but then people actually started taking it seriously.

    I've heard that that's the way the flat earth movement started. Just a bunch of people doing it as a joke, but then people actually started taking it seriously.

    14 votes
  16. Comment on What do you think about the concept of generations? in ~talk

    Seven
    Link
    I really dislike the concept of generations. While some personality aspects are consistent across most people in a single age group, I find that on the whole, generational classifications only...

    I really dislike the concept of generations. While some personality aspects are consistent across most people in a single age group, I find that on the whole, generational classifications only serve to generalize and insult members of any particular generation. We can see this with how millennials were categorized as lazy and entitled, and now how baby boomers are categorized as out of touch and rude. I watched this great talk by Adam Conover about how basically all people are diverse and have different interests and abilities, and so it is counterproductive to categorize people by age at all.

    7 votes