hydravion's recent activity

  1. Comment on Defeat your demons with Dungeons & Dragons: An investigation of the resurgence of D&D in ~games.tabletop

    hydravion
    Link Parent
    Oh, great! That's cool to hear :) Even cooler :p May I ask you, provided that it isn't too personal or private, what the wildest thing that's ever happened to you while on a D&D campaign is? And...

    [...] the majority of people I have played with are actually European

    Oh, great! That's cool to hear :)

    because the people I have met by playing D&D (starting in elementary school) are still amongst my dearest friends (in real life and online). :)

    Even cooler :p

    May I ask you, provided that it isn't too personal or private, what the wildest thing that's ever happened to you while on a D&D campaign is? And also, what the story of your favorite campaign is, in broad strokes?

    1 vote
  2. Comment on Defeat your demons with Dungeons & Dragons: An investigation of the resurgence of D&D in ~games.tabletop

    hydravion
    Link Parent
    Yeah, definitely! I've found this video to be of very high quality, quite a delight to watch, especially for someone like me who's still somewhat unfamiliar with this game. I doubt that many...

    They did a really good job covering the subject

    Yeah, definitely! I've found this video to be of very high quality, quite a delight to watch, especially for someone like me who's still somewhat unfamiliar with this game. I doubt that many people play or even know about it here in Europe compared to in the USA, but I may be wrong.
    And there's so much more to it than meets the eye, e.g., its therapeutic aspect, which was quite unexpected to me. It actually helped some people get through very difficult times in their lives! Can a game even do that?!
    I think that's incredible.

    Thanks for sharing this

    You're welcome! :)

    2 votes
  3. Comment on Tildes and multi-dimensional weighted votes in ~tildes

    hydravion
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    I understand, but I am not so sure that it would be difficult to use... There are some games on mobile in which one can control a character and move around in a world in three dimensions, like...

    I understand, but I am not so sure that it would be difficult to use...
    There are some games on mobile in which one can control a character and move around in a world in three dimensions, like this one.
    Do you see that circle in the bottom left corner? The square I've proposed could (but doesn't have to) look like this circle. I don't play a lot on mobile, but I reckon that one may still easily express their opinion with the square I've proposed, seeing that one may already move around in a 3D world using a similar mechanism.

    I'd also like to stress that the square could probably be designed in a way that is not too invasive for the user (so that it doesn't become clutter on the screen).

    As for the voting distribution, I was thinking of a traditional plot using two axes. We would then draw a curve for the quality of the post, and another one for the level of (dis)agreeance. We would have more data telling a more nuanced story. Voting wouldn't be binary anymore, and we'd observe votes being distributed around a mean value. On some posts, it would be quite dispersed around it, on others, much less so, the mean value would differ, and all of this would better tell us what posts are of higher quality, what posts are more controversial, what posts are more low-effort, etc.
    In my opinion, that'd be great.

    (I'm sorry I haven't answered all your questions, I have to go somewhere and I'm running late... see you around!)

    4 votes
  4. Comment on Tildes and multi-dimensional weighted votes in ~tildes

    hydravion
    Link Parent
    This is a valid concern, I see where you're coming from. I am not sure though, whether this feature would really need to be explained to Tildes' users... On the one hand, it is very intuitive and...

    This is a valid concern, I see where you're coming from.
    I am not sure though, whether this feature would really need to be explained to Tildes' users... On the one hand, it is very intuitive and easily understood: I agree, I go up; I like, I go right... and on the other hand, Tildes' userbase consists of a certain kind of demographic, a kind that wouldn't struggle to use such a feature...

    The best way to judge, in my opinion, would be to make an experiment and look at the data. What does it tell us? Do users effortlessly adopt that new feature? Is it confusing? If it is, can we tweak the feature to make it less so? Or is it straightforward enough to use? Do users vote more? Less?

    I understand that we humans are averse to change, and that has its advantages, but sometimes good things happen when we change!
    :)

    4 votes
  5. Comment on Tildes and multi-dimensional weighted votes in ~tildes

    hydravion
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    I agree with you. When a make a new post on Tildes, I usually take a moment to think of the right tags for it, and it does sometimes feel like too much work. With that said, would the first...

    I agree with you. When a make a new post on Tildes, I usually take a moment to think of the right tags for it, and it does sometimes feel like too much work.

    With that said, would the first mechanism I've proposed (the square with two axes) really be too burdensome to use? Or would we rather get used to it after a while?

    It may actually not be too much work: it's still a one-click mechanism. Fair enough, it's not just click, rather click-drag-and-release, but that's it! You draw an arrow and you're done.
    You may even make it a habit to draw a small upward arrow as a generic response, an equivalent to our mindless votes.
    But when a post deserves better than our inattention, when its high-quality calls for stronger support, then you're equipped!
    Is it very high-quality and you strongly agree with it? Fully veer to the top right corner. Is a comment well-written, but you really disagree with it? Just sway slightly upwards, and move fully to the left.

    It is simple to understand, and simple to use. It does require a little bit of thought–but not that much either.
    And after all, Tildistas tend to be the intelligent and cultivated kind of folks, it seems to me.
    The kind of folks whom I could see use such a mechanism :)

    Who knows if we won't actually like it once it is in beta-testing?

    I think we should give it a try and see how it goes.

    8 votes
  6. Tildes and multi-dimensional weighted votes

    hello, I've been wondering a little bit about what a well-designed voting system on a website like reddit or Tildes would look like, and as I do not have a definitive answer, I do have a...

    hello,

    I've been wondering a little bit about what a well-designed voting system on a website like reddit or Tildes would look like, and as I do not have a definitive answer, I do have a suggestion to make. I've originally posted this on another website, but I thought that it could also be fruitful to discuss this here, seeing that efforts have already been made in that direction (similar features have even already been implemented).

    Looking forward to reading you!

    I was wondering whether Aether should support downvotes or not, seeing that they are often misused on other discussion platforms to suppress content that is disliked rather than non-contributory or low-quality. People may then not view content that was heavily downvoted, even though it may have been high-quality.

    Should we rather use some other mechanism to serve that function? If so, what would it be?

    Personally, I'd suggest that we experiment with two-dimensional weighted voting.

    In a word, it would allow users to express both whether they agree or disagree with (alternatively, like or dislike) a piece of content (and how strongly so) and whether they think that that piece of content is high-quality or low-quality (and how strongly so).

    In practice, it could look like this (for users): upon clicking on the voting icon, a square with two scaled axes would appear. One for the quality of content, the other for the level of (dis)agreeance. A user, who had for instance found a piece of content to be very high-quality, but who somewhat disagreed with it, could then express that opinion by click and dragging right to the top of the square, but somewhat left of its center.

    That simple mechanism would therefore allow us to distinguish between those two criteria and better capture the intention behind a vote, and help alleviate the issue of seeing deeply unpopular content being buried despite its high quality. It would also allow users to express how strongly they feel about a piece of content by letting them adjust the weight of their vote. Plus, it wouldn't be too cumbersome to use (in my opinion).

    (Voting strongly should be slightly inconvenient or cumbersome to do, so as to deter users from voting strongly every time, thereby rendering strong votes meaningless. In practice, that could mean having to move one's mouse only a little for a soft vote, but more and more as the vote gains more weight.
    Axes should also be sticky, so as to make it easy to vote with respect to one criterion only (we shouldn't need to try and aim precisely).)

    We could also put in place some additional mechanism to let users rate content with regard to other criteria (how informative it is, or impressive, exciting, funny, etc.). I do not expect users to rate all the content they read, but allowing them to do so could still be useful. They may still bother to do it for content they find especially informative, impressive, etc., and that would then allow other users to sort content with regard to one or several of these criteria and find content tailored to their interests.

    (We could then also display for any piece of content a chart (that could look like this) showing how it was rated with regard to all these criteria. That's not really important, but I find that cool.

    We could also plot the number of votes as a function of vote strength, find the average vote strength and so on... That would also be cool, and interesting.)

    What do you think?

    24 votes
  7. Comment on A new funding model for open source software in ~tech

    hydravion
    Link Parent
    Okay, I hope you'll find a model that works for you then :)

    Okay, I hope you'll find a model that works for you then :)

    3 votes
  8. Comment on A new funding model for open source software in ~tech

    hydravion
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    Good points. This may not sound appealing, but how about building two different websites that share the bulk of their codebase, one being monetized while the other isn't, so that the monetized one...

    Good points.

    This may not sound appealing, but how about building two different websites that share the bulk of their codebase, one being monetized while the other isn't, so that the monetized one pays for the two, but the unmonetized one isn't impacted by the negative consequences of monetization?

    As for how to build a large community for the monetized one when there's already reddit, you could take advantage of the fact that reddit is for the most part concerned with English-speaking users. Sure, there is the occasional language-specific subreddit providing content in that language, but that remains negligible.
    There seems to be room for you to grow in the other markets.

    reddit helped me learn English, and it could have helped me learn other languages, if it were available in other languages. I actually searched for reddit clones in German and Arabic when I was learning those languages, but couldn't find any in the former, and found only one in the latter, which I rarely use as it didn't manage to build a community as interesting and entertaining as that of reddit.

    In brief, communities that speak other languages do not always have access to a quality equivalent to reddit, if they are even familiar with the concept of such a website in the first place. You could grow where reddit didn't, and use your monetized website to pay for the development of the unmonetized one. Thus, you would both make a decent living and build the unmonetized website you envisioned.

    What do you think?

    PS – The site could remain closed-source while you're building its userbase and become open-source again as soon as it's become so big that users won't choose competitors and copycats over it.

    1 vote
  9. Comment on A new funding model for open source software in ~tech

    hydravion
    Link
    @Deimos, have you considered taking this path?

    @Deimos, have you considered taking this path?

    3 votes
  10. Comment on Andrew Yang at the CNN Climate Crisis Town Hall in ~enviro

    hydravion
    Link
    A bit old, but still relevant and interesting.

    A bit old, but still relevant and interesting.