k463b_92p's recent activity

  1. Comment on Believe it or not, men who can’t tell the difference between attraction and connection are not unusual in ~life

    k463b_92p
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    I think you're asking a lot of what is a pretty uncomplicated empirical observation. We might have different backgrounds, but I wouldn't be surprised if a straight friend told me they felt such an...

    I think you're asking a lot of what is a pretty uncomplicated empirical observation.

    We might have different backgrounds, but I wouldn't be surprised if a straight friend told me they felt such an urge… because they already have. I've seen memes on the internet about it. I've also felt it. (tbh, kinda hard not to have these moments if you spend 3 hours a day on a sports team.) I'm not really interested in defending the validity of these experiences or our sexualities to skeptics over the internet, but it definitely isn't unheard of for decidedly straight men to mix up boundaries with close platonic friends, especially in emotional, high-stakes situations, and I also don't feel compelled to cite a study to argue that it's common.

    In general, I would ask you this: is it necessary or useful to back every observation we make with the full might of the scientific endeavor? I'm reminded of academic statements like "the fear of death [has] a central and often unsuspected role in psychological life" or "people with a high social intelligence are enormously qualified for life." This is tautology. Academia can build off such axioms to reach meaningful conclusions, but it doesn't need to prove them beforehand. I would ask you to consider whether our hyper-liberal, hyper-rational, scientistic inclinations are actually beneficial when they inhibit our ability to think for ourselves, and particularly when they make us beholden to the extremely vast set of procedural issues within scientific research.

    I know this ruffles feathers in educated circles. I bring it up because the inclinations I refer to raise the bar for basic, mutual human understanding beyond a reasonable threshold. Your accommodation of a straightforward, reasonable, and/or obvious remark—or even an outlandish one—isn't harmful as long as you recognize it as "one experience/interpretation among many" and not automatically as "The Great Truth of the Universe." Skepticism is great, but I encourage you not to instinctively reject observations on the basis that they don't have a scientific study attached.

    15 votes
  2. Comment on <deleted topic> in ~talk

    k463b_92p
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    I took 3.5g (1/8oz) my first time doing shrooms. I had a very good trip—it was fairly intense and I never felt scared, anxious, or otherwise negative. That's not a reckless dosage if you've done...

    I took 3.5g (1/8oz) my first time doing shrooms. I had a very good trip—it was fairly intense and I never felt scared, anxious, or otherwise negative. That's not a reckless dosage if you've done other psychedelics, but the advice of others on this thread about smaller doses is perfectly valid.

    Note that I was feeling very good that day beforehand, and I tripped with several close friends (one of whom was sober and keeping an eye on us) and we were in a very safe, naturalistic environment. I spent a lot of time exploring, touching, looking, listening, and moving. I spent very little time in my own head. I was reasonably energetic that day and the mushrooms enhanced the effect greatly.

    My biggest takeaway was that I was deeply and intrinsically connected to everything in the entire world. I could feel the way my body existed in relation to the ground and the trees and all else surrounding me, and conflict felt pointless and insignificant. I enjoyed this very much.

    Some other times I have taken shrooms, I have been in much more of a "vibe out" mood. Your experience will depend almost exclusively on how you feel going into the trip and the stimuli surrounding you. To some extent, this means you can sort of manifest a good trip, within reason—this is what I did my first time. Don't lie to yourself, though. If you're not feeling good, just try another day.

    Seriously, do not take any drugs when you're in a bad headspace!

    P.S. I personally recommend spending time outdoors on shrooms! Sitting and watching something trippy on a TV can be nice, but the most interesting part about this drug is the way it changes all your senses—not just sight. But even if you don't have a safe, secluded outdoor area to do shrooms, you will still have a great time. It is a really fun experience.

    5 votes
  3. Comment on First human head transplantation: Surgically challenging, ethically controversial and historically tempting – an experimental endeavor or a scientific landmark? in ~science

    k463b_92p
    Link Parent
    I understand this perspective, and I don't disagree with the person you're replying to, but I feel that we mislead ourselves by supposing that our bodies are "foreign matter" to the brain and...
    • Exemplary

    I understand this perspective, and I don't disagree with the person you're replying to, but I feel that we mislead ourselves by supposing that our bodies are "foreign matter" to the brain and therefore have no ontological relevance to our consciousness or identity.

    I am not my brain. My brain is part of me. I am defined just as much by the length of my fingers and the addictions of my gut bacteria as the pretentions of unilateral autonomy held by my pre-frontal cortex. Holistically, the entity whose component parts include my mind and body exists as a series of snapshots progressing as my cells die, or whatever arbitrary point I feel constitutes a change of my being. If my brain and other organs "recognize" a particular part of my body as being so ordered, then that's that. A surgically implanted anything cannot be foreign matter to my brain because, in their ungodly marriage, the former has implicitly been internalized into my conscious and/or unconscious recognition of myself. My brain may have "autonomy" to the extent that it believes it has the final say in how I make an action, and so it is the least worst individual organ to determine someone's identity "legally" (yuck), but this is an abstraction made for our own convenience. Our legal system is rooted in ancient ideologies and has no understanding of the revelations of postmodernity and its derivatives.

    I'm not able to discuss philosophy further, as I'm both unqualified for it and extremely tired. I have chosen to log into my account and write this comment because we do a disservice to the biological histories we inhabit every day by over-centering our conceptualization of identity on one part of what informs it. Any theory of self-recognition that presents the brain as the lord of all and the bondsman of none is alien to the lives we actually lead, and therefore incomplete. We must desist from such self-separatism or face un-identification.

    21 votes
  4. Comment on Oregon legalizes psilocybin mushrooms (for therapeutic purposes) and decriminalizes all drugs in ~health

    k463b_92p
    Link Parent
    To aspiring users, I feel compelled to explicitly reiterate that it can be pretty dangerous to use psychedelics outside of a monitored, therapeutic context if you aren't already in a good mental...
    • Exemplary

    To aspiring users, I feel compelled to explicitly reiterate that it can be pretty dangerous to use psychedelics outside of a monitored, therapeutic context if you aren't already in a good mental place. That includes depression, anxiety, insecurity, stress, or general irritation. I think it's great that Oregon is legalizing psilocybin mushrooms for use in therapy sessions, but people shouldn't take this as an indication that they were "perfectly fine all along." They can still mess with you a lot. A trip changes you in a way that smoking doesn't.

    I had a good experience the first time I did mushrooms, but it was equal parts drug and mindset. My attitude was "I'm feeling good about myself, and I'm excited about this experience. I'm not anxious." Emphasis on the "not anxious" part. I had already talked through it all with our trip-sitter and was confident the day before. I woke up still feeling good and decided that I was going to be positive about whatever happened. That was only possible because I was not lying to myself, or hiding anything, or feeling insecure. I accepted that the mushrooms would play with my brain a little, and I would observe (and live) those changes for a few hours in a fun way. That's it. I would've been having fun that day regardless. I'm a very kinetic person, so when I ended up running, dancing, jumping, and touching everything, the drug had not "introduced" anything new so much as it heightened what I already felt to an extremely high degree. Fortunately, it's not like I ever had a problem "dealing with" being in a good mood. But I cannot say the same for negative mindsets.

    People can easily have a bad trip on an otherwise good day, but that will really just make it "unpleasant." If you have a bad trip on a bad day then it will be absolutely terrible, or terrifying, or both. So ultimately my suggestions would be to 1) make sure you're feeling very good day-of, 2) have an experienced trip-sitter keep an eye on you, 3) if doing it in a group, make sure you genuinely trust and like those people (a lot), and give yourselves and them space if needed. I recommend chocolate pudding. Just be safe about it.

    13 votes