tauon's recent activity

  1. Comment on Shell to permanently close all of its hydrogen refuelling stations for cars in California in ~transport

    tauon
    Link Parent
    Tangential: do you happen to know about the status of hydrogen for freight ships? Personally I’m not quite sure if the hydrogen trucking option has not already, uh, departed, unfortunately. The...

    Tangential: do you happen to know about the status of hydrogen for freight ships?

    Personally I’m not quite sure if the hydrogen trucking option has not already, uh, departed, unfortunately. The complete lack of infrastructure is one thing, but there isn’t even mature tech ready now, let alone on the roads, as far as I know…

    Edit: Toyota is in somewhat of a weird spot as already mentioned in this thread, due to the domestic electric grid situation in their home Japan market. Also, they massively blew EV adoption, so they sort of have an unreasonable incentive to push the “other” somewhat opposing alternatives to combustion engine cars.

    2 votes
  2. Comment on Shell to permanently close all of its hydrogen refuelling stations for cars in California in ~transport

    tauon
    Link Parent
    Last I read, battery swapping does not seem to be feasible as the manufacturer trend seems to be achieving space savings in the build by integrating the battery more tightly into the chassis (ex....

    Last I read, battery swapping does not seem to be feasible as the manufacturer trend seems to be achieving space savings in the build by integrating the battery more tightly into the chassis (ex. industry pioneer Tesla), which is in contrast to previous “flat”, large battery packs fully located in a single rectangle towards the bottom, which might’ve enabled something like this.*

    Also, I view charging times as a solved non-issue, to be frank. Anything under 15 minutes – and I’m sure the industry will push this down to like 10 eventually – for 80% of the capacity is completely fine, even for long distance routes.
    Sure, there will always be one single traveller who never takes a break in 500 miles of road driven, and drives those distances on a weekly basis too, but that’s borderline dangerous (full, actual zero-supervision self-driving won’t be a thing for at least two, three more decades either, if ever).

    The real bottleneck in my opinion is the availability of functioning, high-performance charging stations, plus accurate, real-time information about operational status (stall broken) or availability (stall in use/all stalls reserved for the next 45 minutes). But battery technology has increased in performance so drastically over the past 10ish years, while battery prices per kWh have fallen pretty massively, I’m not too worried about that aspect.

    Finally, as I try to in- and conclude with every of my comments on the electrification of cars/transport industry: This does not influence the fact western societies need to become less car-dependent, or absolve them of action now, if it’s about adoption-positive news.

    *P.S. Even back then with the “simpler” style of battery blocks, it was never going to happen – imagine the effort of propping up hydrogen stations like in this article, in sufficient numbers, everywhere there are currently cars, but for a machine with presumably robot arms, precise and smart enough to use screws or some other also secure mechanism to remove any car make and model’s expensive batteries? Yeah nah. They couldn’t even agree on a charger format, so there might have been a proprietary solutions for 1-2 vendors, after copious amounts of R&D costs which’d have gotten passed on to the purchasing consumers, for a process which might’ve saved half the time, five versus ten minutes or whatever. I tend to classify that as a pipe dream from back when charging times were actually an issue for anyone not an EV/tech enthusiast.

    11 votes
  3. Comment on GUI dev using Godot in ~comp

    tauon
    Link Parent
    https://tauri.app Should you have further interest in diving into the web stack frontend at one point (like I plan to do soon™️), you might want to check out Tauri, which integrates the OS’ native...

    [B]ut it sometimes seems a bit insane to have a whole web browser implementation just for a desktop app.

    https://tauri.app

    Should you have further interest in diving into the web stack frontend at one point (like I plan to do soon™️), you might want to check out Tauri, which integrates the OS’ native website rendering, thus eliminating the need to ship (and run) a whole browser engine. It’s pretty clever to be honest. They’ve been making decent progress from what I could tell.

    4 votes
  4. Comment on What programming/technical projects have you been working on? in ~comp

    tauon
    Link
    Over the past few evenings, I’ve been getting “back” into R after surface-level working with it in university quite a while ago, in order to help analyze my dad’s recent addition to his house, a...

    Over the past few evenings, I’ve been getting “back” into R after surface-level working with it in university quite a while ago, in order to help analyze my dad’s recent addition to his house, a photovoltaic installation.

    A very surprising and interesting learning, for example, has been the fact that depending on the time of year, the north-facing modules make up almost 50% of the total production, which is something we as non-experts had absolutely never expected!

    It still is a rather short script, but it has been fun (mostly) to write and expand it.
    All that’s really left to do now is some QOL stuff (e.g. allowing to pass options to the script for PDF/PNG output, which timespans to plot or exclude, etc.), but the elephant in the room is actually an issue we both can’t fix: data sourcing.

    The current workflow includes being logged in on the installation company’s website, manually selecting the date(s) from which to export, waiting for the server to very slowly generate the Excel (not csv!) file, and downloading it. Whenever we tried to export datasets over ≈two weeks in duration, it would even hang and eventually after a couple of minutes give up entirely.

    Ideally this could be an automated process, but alas, it isn’t. Then again, the use case isn’t production-grade, rather it originated out of curiosity-driven experimentation. At least the raw data is available in some format, and digitally…

    1 vote
  5. Comment on Kagi Smallweb [a website where each visit shows a random indie/small website, e.g. personal blogs] in ~tech

    tauon
    Link Parent
    Probably don’t need to tell you this, but for the others here considering Kagi: In addition to the lenses feature, the fact that you can promote, demote, and even outright pin or block any domain...

    Probably don’t need to tell you this, but for the others here considering Kagi: In addition to the lenses feature, the fact that you can promote, demote, and even outright pin or block any domain in your search results is a level of UX you’ll never find in Google Search.

    12 votes
  6. Comment on Kagi Smallweb [a website where each visit shows a random indie/small website, e.g. personal blogs] in ~tech

    tauon
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    Originally I was going to also, in great detail, list all of the things I like so much about Kagi that make it the best search engine period, plus by extension why it’s worth paying for. However...

    Originally I was going to also, in great detail, list all of the things I like so much about Kagi that make it the best search engine period, plus by extension why it’s worth paying for.
    However instead, I thought of bringing a different perspective this time.

    As a sort of meta-level gauge of how good Kagi’s product is: Their marketing budget is zero.

    The entirety of their customer base of more than ≈20,000 has either been convinced to pay from word-of-mouth advertising of existing, content customers, or found the service by first stumbling upon their adjacent offering, the Orion browser (which tangentially, is apparently as good as Kagi Search, but still in macOS only Beta)

    It’s been a very long time since I’ve heard of a startup that didn’t need to push marketing at all. Maybe Tesla? I don’t know the background/specifics there.


    My pipeline was the typical Google → DuckDuckGo → Kagi one, I’d been trying to de-monopolize in all sorts of areas for a few years at that point… but to be honest, DDG wasn’t the perfect replacement some people make it out to be. Kagi on the other hand? Kind of is. Of course due to the nature of being a paid service, some people can not or will not want to ever afford such a service, but for those who are in the position financially and do like the concept, it is a great way to spend your money.

    I also like their approach to “Safe Search”, so if you have kids I’d highly recommend checking out the family plans.

    Consider labeling off-topic but I just wanted to share this.

    Edit: If you include the family users in the above stats page, it’s probably getting closer to over 25k users too.

    9 votes
  7. Comment on Is anyone here a consultant? I have questions... in ~life

    tauon
    Link Parent
    If you don’t mind answering, I would have two tangentially related questions (but definitely going more in the off topic direction): In a high-level view, over the span of a potential “consulting...

    If you don’t mind answering, I would have two tangentially related questions (but definitely going more in the off topic direction):

    I personally like consulting quite a lot because I love solving unique issues for a large variety of people, more than I like solving the same problem over-and-over for the same employer. But that's since pushed me less into "consulting" and more into creating my own ventures.

    1. In a high-level view, over the span of a potential “consulting career”, how do you ensure you get to solve unique issues and that it stays that way? I.e., what prevents it from turning into solving the same problem over and over, just for different employers? Do/did you select clients and projects with this desire for new challenges in mind? Do you have to prevent becoming known as the consultant person for “x” problem and only getting hired to solve that category of issue among a variety of firms?
    2. What formal education, if any, and what informal education did you acquire yourself to be equipped for these kinds of presumably challenging tasks? How long (if at all) were you employed using those niche/rarer skills you mentioned before being able to consult on the topics?

    I’m currently in my last Bachelor year at a fairly renowned European university, in a decently but not overly technical subject/field, and feel like I would severely lack practical experience and knowledge, were I to want to start consulting in “my” area right now.
    And to be clear, I’m assuming that’s mostly normal and to be expected.

    Also I wanted to ask since – from what I’ve heard, and you’ve alluded to at the start of your first comment too – the work in a general business/management consulting firm, no matter the size, is quite different from that more technical, more independent type of consulting which you described.

    But being able to experience work that’s not the same over and over in one’s job until retirement sure sounds appealing. (:

    4 votes
  8. Comment on Tell me about your weird religious beliefs in ~humanities

    tauon
    Link Parent
    Yup (not who you responded to) – I’m probably what classifies as agnostic, but I like The Egg’s ideas a lot too. Narrated and animated version: https://youtu.be/h6fcK_fRYaI

    Yup (not who you responded to) – I’m probably what classifies as agnostic, but I like The Egg’s ideas a lot too.

    Narrated and animated version: https://youtu.be/h6fcK_fRYaI

    2 votes
  9. Comment on What programming/technical projects have you been working on? in ~comp

    tauon
    Link Parent
    If you don’t mind me asking, how old is your kid and do they have previous "experience" to be showing this much interest? Don’t get me wrong, it’s a great thing they’re this curious and that you...

    If you don’t mind me asking, how old is your kid and do they have previous "experience" to be showing this much interest? Don’t get me wrong, it’s a great thing they’re this curious and that you can support them this well – I’m just curious what bracket this would be age-appropriate for.

    1 vote
  10. Comment on What programming/technical projects have you been working on? in ~comp

    tauon
    Link
    My city’s public transportation API is something I’ve long been meaning to work on/with. Issue is, since these API libraries are usually unofficial, there’s half a dozen of them out there, with...

    My city’s public transportation API is something I’ve long been meaning to work on/with.

    Issue is, since these API libraries are usually unofficial, there’s half a dozen of them out there, with half of them being deprecated/archived/non-functional within 2-3 years of being published. I now seem to have found a working one and already implemented a demo barebones CLI which fetches the next departure times (i.e., including potential delays) for a given real-name station, akin to a very basic version of this inspiration.

    The current problem: what I’d really like to accomplish is the ability to do full route planning as a fully viable replacement to the official app or website. However, I’m not so sure if this particular API even has these features… And I definitely lack the skills to extend it as such; I just wanted a reasonably-sized project to improve my Python and/or Unix-style CLI building skills.

  11. Comment on Vesuvius Challenge 2023 Grand Prize awarded: we can read the first scroll! in ~comp

    tauon
    Link Parent
    Objection: There have been plenty of such use cases, however it’s just the case that the general public outside of "sciencey" circles, for the most part, did not and does not really care about...
    • Exemplary

    This might be one of the first "awesome for humanity" uses for AI

    Objection: There have been plenty of such use cases, however it’s just the case that the general public outside of "sciencey" circles, for the most part, did not and does not really care about forms and applications of AI which they cannot talk to themselves.

    Some examples, chronologically from oldest to most recent:

    • Go (the Asian board game) AI beating the best human players in 2016 [1]
    • IBM’s Project debater was first demonstrated in 2018 [2]
    • AlphaFold in 2019 – this one’s story is really really crazy [3]: How proteins fold is (was?) one of the biggest unsolved things in medicine/biology, and AlphaFold in its first iteration already beat out all "manual labor" approaches of competition, and in the next iterations, basically single-handedly removed decades of work ahead of science in one fell swoop. These results can now be used to research e.g. how molecular "ingredients" in new medications will interact, where and how exactly they are likely to dock in human receptors, etc. in so many medicinal fields, all of which would’ve previously been utterly impossible, to the point where it’s hard to describe just how impossible.
    • Ancient cuneiform text translation [4]: The AI was better than the (already very small) circle of human experts in a matter of not-an-expert’s-lifetime worth of training in 2020
    • Breast Cancer detection in image scans in 2023 [5]

    [1] Digital intuition. A computer program that can outplay humans in the abstract game of Go will redefine our relationship with machines, in Nature; this is about AlphaGo (Wikipedia)
    [2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Debater
    [3] AlphaFold at CASP13 in Bioinformatics 35; see also Wikipedia
    [4] Reading Akkadian cuneiform using natural language processing (https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0240511); furthermore: Restoring and attributing ancient texts using deep neural networks, in Nature (2022)
    [5] FabNet: A Features Agglomeration-Based Convolutional Neural Network for Multiscale Breast Cancer Histopathology Images Classification in Cancers: 1013 (https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers15041013)

    7 votes
  12. Comment on How to watch Super Bowl 2024: All the best streaming options in ~sports.american_football

    tauon
    Link Parent
    Well…, technically yes, but not quite. I recognize I’m in a niche here, but this was my response from the page: If I really wanted to, some VPN service would probably make it work though.

    and is viewable in any web browser.

    Well…, technically yes, but not quite. I recognize I’m in a niche here, but this was my response from the page:

    Access Denied - Streameast

    Sorry, you do not have permission to access this page.

    Reason for this error:

    You are trying to log in from a country that we have banned from accessing the site.

    You can only access Streameast from the countries listed: USA, UK, Canada, Australia, Brazil, France, Mexico

    If you live in one of the above countries and using a VPN or proxy, you can disable it and access our site.

    If I really wanted to, some VPN service would probably make it work though.

    1 vote
  13. Comment on Can you recommend songs or musicians/bands with lyrics in Spanish? in ~music

    tauon
    Link
    Rosalía was already mentioned plenty… Other than that, I improved my (unfortunately still very basic) understanding of the language a little by my dad playing Buena Vista Social Club’s album when...

    Rosalía was already mentioned plenty…

    Other than that, I improved my (unfortunately still very basic) understanding of the language a little by my dad playing Buena Vista Social Club’s album when I was a kid.

    Edit; Forgot to mention they’re from Cuba.

  14. Comment on Tips on building keyboard-centric workflow in ~tech

    tauon
    Link Parent
    +1 for Rectangle and Raycast. Couldn’t use the Mac without them. Great recommendations in the “other keyboard shortcuts” section, too. I might look into rCmd, haven’t heard of it before, looks...

    +1 for Rectangle and Raycast. Couldn’t use the Mac without them. Great recommendations in the “other keyboard shortcuts” section, too.

    I might look into rCmd, haven’t heard of it before, looks intriguing.

    Some notes on the special letters/characters:

    if you need special characters, mac doesn’t do alt-codes, instead you can press alt+[sometimes shift]+[some other keyboard key] to get the character. For example, pi is alt+p.

    There is a special “unicode characters” keyboard (I forget the exact name they gave it) which you can set up in keyboard settings, then activate by pressing function (it’s like regular switching to a different language/alphabet keyboard layout). Then you can hold option/alt key and type the alt code, e.g. ⌥ 2 7 2 6 yielding “✦” to appear on your screen.

    You can also do this for international characters on a US keyboard (unsure about international keyboards but I imagine it’s similar): alt+u followed by a character supporting umlauts will yield the umlauted character (ex: alt+u e yields ë).

    In “native” text inputs (not sure how or why developers can disable it, but I’m fairly certain it’s possible), so most text areas, as well as in all stock GUI Apple apps (should you choose to use those), you can also hold the letter, and a range of options appears, assigning a digit to each letter with umlaut. So pressing E and then either of 1, 2, 3, … gives the altered letter (the exact order offered is dependent on current keyboard layout, since that might offer umlauted letters already in the first/“topmost” layer).

    Edit:

    cmd+ctrl+space if you want an emoji picker (in messages you can press the globe/fn key after a word to get an associated emoji too)

    Forgot to mention, but function + e can open this too, at least sometimes, I believe.

    1 vote
  15. Comment on Over 5,000 games industry workers have already lost their jobs in 2024 in ~games

    tauon
    Link Parent
    Do you really think that’s the case? Genuine question, because I don’t know it. From what I recall, the only news I ever seem to have seen is companies’ executives urgently stating “we need more...

    given that there is a massive surplus [of prospective employees] in the sector.

    Do you really think that’s the case? Genuine question, because I don’t know it.

    From what I recall, the only news I ever seem to have seen is companies’ executives urgently stating “we need more software engineers of all kinds, and we need them yesterday, not when the current college kids graduate” – given that nearly all industries today have a need for software of some kind.

    I agree that wages have probably been overinflated for quite a long period now, though.

    12 votes
  16. Comment on Researchers were able to isolate the brain from the rest of the body of a pig, and kept it alive and functioning for five hours in ~science

  17. Comment on Twenty-six billion records exposed in massive leak, including data from Linkedin, X, Dropbox in ~tech

    tauon
    Link Parent
    Very true (reference for the uninitiated), however, outright deleted company data typically doesn’t make for a very compelling argument for ransom-demanding hackers anymore ;)

    Very true (reference for the uninitiated), however, outright deleted company data typically doesn’t make for a very compelling argument for ransom-demanding hackers anymore ;)

    3 votes
  18. Comment on WiFi 7 is officially here, but routers are pricey. Do you need it yet? in ~tech

    tauon
    Link Parent
    Becoming more available? Certainly, and it’s for the better. No question, it’s overdue. I know, because where I live, the best offer is still only 100 Mbps (and that’s theoretical, not actual...

    Internet service speeds at or beyond a gigabit is becoming increasingly more available, and right now I’m pretty sure my ISP’s cheapest plan is 250Mbps.

    Becoming more available? Certainly, and it’s for the better. No question, it’s overdue. I know, because where I live, the best offer is still only 100 Mbps (and that’s theoretical, not actual availability, as you alluded to), and up until 2020 my then-household of four made due with a laughable ~10 Mbps or so (max) stemming from an ancient mid-2000s contract, the reason that prompted an increase finally was three people needing to take part in video calls at the same time due to the pandemic.

    But again, is even a gigabit truly needed? Video streaming doesn’t need anywhere close to that speed, and it’s the most taxing application I can think of where the speed would really matter – for absolutely average consumers. Of course it will absolutely not cover some people’s use cases, but I imagine those to be in a rather tiny minority. Most people don’t have a NAS (but then router speeds would only matter for the internal connection, not wrt what ISPs are offering), most people don’t have homelabs, heck apart from mobile phones, most people probably don’t store a lot of data in any cloud to begin with (if they even still have desktop/laptop computers, that is…)

    1 vote
  19. Comment on What programming/technical projects have you been working on? in ~comp

    tauon
    Link Parent
    As someone who is also a pretty beginner-level programmer, but has completed a few simpler projects, I feel like this too quite often. However usually, I can ease my mind with a line of reasoning...

    It makes me worry, though, that I'll lose all of the concepts that I learned before this and haven't put into practice yet.

    As someone who is also a pretty beginner-level programmer, but has completed a few simpler projects, I feel like this too quite often.

    However usually, I can ease my mind with a line of reasoning that goes something like this: Once I've initially understood, learned and really tried to grasp a concept, even if I do forget it later, I can always revisit the topic (should I ever need it again in the first place…), and most often, I will start to remember the important/difficult bits again pretty quickly. It's typically just so much easier the second time around, even if you feel like you know nothing anymore when you start revisiting it the second (or third, or later) time around. Same holds for closely related topics, or (nearly) the same topic in a different framework/language/setting.

    It is a bit like learning to ride a bike, perhaps.

    3 votes
  20. Comment on Twenty-six billion records exposed in massive leak, including data from Linkedin, X, Dropbox in ~tech

    tauon
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    A great practical (beginner-friendly) demonstration of this has been done on the Computerphile channel quite a while ago, but still holds up nicely: https://youtu.be/ciNHn38EyRc

    A lot of leaks happen because companies don't properly secure how their websites process user inputs. So sometimes users can put actual SQL queries (the language most databases talk in) into inputs like the user name or password fields.

    A great practical (beginner-friendly) demonstration of this has been done on the Computerphile channel quite a while ago, but still holds up nicely:

    https://youtu.be/ciNHn38EyRc

    6 votes