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  • Showing only topics with the tag "hiring". Back to normal view
    1. What is hiring in software engineering like for a person with a specialization? (e.g. computer vision)

      (I figure I might have more success asking here than HN. Maybe I should get a lobste.rs account? If this is the wrong place, feel free to move.) My background isn't in software engineering -- it's...

      (I figure I might have more success asking here than HN. Maybe I should get a lobste.rs account? If this is the wrong place, feel free to move.)

      My background isn't in software engineering -- it's in ECE. The majority of my projects so far have been in implementing ECE theory, then evaluating those approaches experimentally. I may even pursue a master's focusing further on computer vision (image processing, data analysis, machine learning).

      My work is software adjacent, but I don't know if it's what you'd typically think of when you hear "software engineering". Most of the hiring advice I see online, though, geared towards pure software engineering grads. Silicon Valley and FAANG dominate the conversation. So, I have trouble parsing what advice is applicable to me, and what's only relevant for others. (e.g. should I be throwing myself into Cracking the Code Interview, and practicing algorithms and data structures? Do I even need a master's to pursue my niche?)

      How do I find out what's expected of me in a more specific field? How do I build a career that allows me to be a specialist, rather than a generalist?

      4 votes
    2. Do you enjoy programming outside of work?

      I have found this to be a semi controversial topic. Its almost becoming a required point for getting a new job to have open source work that you can show. Some people just enjoy working on...

      I have found this to be a semi controversial topic. Its almost becoming a required point for getting a new job to have open source work that you can show. Some people just enjoy working on programming side projects and others don't want to do any more after they leave the office.

      Whats your opinion on this? Do you work on any side projects? Do you think its reasonable for interviewers to look for open source work when hiring?

      16 votes
    3. On hiring for tech positions: How do you get what you need from the HR department?

      I wish I had a dollar for every time I heard a manager complain, “The HR department included ‘must have college degree’ in the job req even though I don’t care” or “They asked for 5 years of...

      I wish I had a dollar for every time I heard a manager complain, “The HR department included ‘must have college degree’ in the job req even though I don’t care” or “They asked for 5 years of experience in a technology that’s only been around for 3” or “I have no idea why they rejected this candidate without even contacting me.”

      Still, in many cases you don’t have a choice. If you want to hire someone, you need to deal with HR, at least to a small degree – especially if you work in a big company.

      So I’m writing a feature story for technology managers, collecting real-world advice from people who learned their lessons the hard way. Here’s the questions I’d like you to answer:

      • Tell me about a frustration you had with the HR department (in regard to hiring). That is, tell me a personal story of HR-gone-wrong. Because we all love schadenfreude, and that gives me an emotional example with which to begin.
      • Let’s say you have a new opening in your department. In what ways do you involve HR? (That could be anything from, “give them general guidelines and let them choose the best candidates for me to interview” to “I do the search myself, and use HR only for on-boarding.”) What makes you choose that path? How much choice do you have in the matter?
      • What weaknesses have you discovered in your HR department’s ability to serve the needs of a tech-focused department?
      • What have you done to cope with those weaknesses? Which of those efforts worked, and which failed?
      • What do you wish you knew “n” years ago about dealing with your company’s HR department?
      • So that I can give the reader some context: Let me know how to refer to you in the article (at least, “Esther, a software architect at a Midwest insurance company”), and give me some idea of your company size (because the processes appropriate for a 70-person company aren’t the same for one with 7,000 employees).

      You don’t have to answer all those questions! I asked these to get the conversation going. Tell me as much or as little as you like.

      Please don’t assume that I think HR always sucks. However, there isn’t as much to learn from “why HR is your friend.” The idea here is to help techie managers cope when HR doesn’t offer what you hoped for.

      16 votes