5 votes

How lucky is too lucky? The Minecraft speedrunning controversy explained

5 comments

  1. [5]
    Bauke
    (edited )
    Link
    Although I haven't kept up with this situation whatsoever and also haven't looked into it myself, but how do the speedrunning communities deal with randomness? Let's say Dream's run was actually...

    Although I haven't kept up with this situation whatsoever and also haven't looked into it myself, but how do the speedrunning communities deal with randomness?

    Let's say Dream's run was actually 100% legit and he did just get that insanely lucky, does it still deserve to be on the leaderboard? I wonder if Speedrun.com or whoever else has like guidelines or something when it comes to randomness and how it should be moderated.

    I can't imagine how I'd feel if I got the astronomically lucky once-in-a-universe run and then it got disqualified because statistically it doesn't work.

    4 votes
    1. teaearlgraycold
      Link Parent
      In general the speedrunning community operates on the idea that you have to earn your luck. A new streamer that shows up and gets an insanely lucky WR run in their first week will probably not...

      In general the speedrunning community operates on the idea that you have to earn your luck. A new streamer that shows up and gets an insanely lucky WR run in their first week will probably not make it onto any leaderboard. A veteran that has streamed 10s of thousands of runs to finally get that near impossible WR will take 1st place without much question.

      9 votes
    2. [3]
      cfabbro
      Link Parent
      I can't answer most of that, since I don't know much about the moderation that goes on behind the scenes. However worth noting is that the issue isn't just Dream's luck in the winning run... if...

      I can't answer most of that, since I don't know much about the moderation that goes on behind the scenes. However worth noting is that the issue isn't just Dream's luck in the winning run... if you watch the video, it shows that almost all his recorded runs had similarly astronomical luck (both in getting Ender pearls and Blaze rods), which is why people got suspicious in the first place.

      4 votes
      1. [2]
        Bauke
        Link Parent
        Yeah, yeah. I just used this instance as an example, I know it wasn't just the final run alone.

        Yeah, yeah. I just used this instance as an example, I know it wasn't just the final run alone.

        1 vote
        1. cfabbro
          (edited )
          Link Parent
          Sure, but it's a pretty shitty example, since it's pretty clear he actually was cheating, IMO. ;) But I understand what you mean. And as for how things work in the community, while I can't speak...

          Sure, but it's a pretty shitty example, since it's pretty clear he actually was cheating, IMO. ;) But I understand what you mean.

          And as for how things work in the community, while I can't speak with any real authority, I have watched a boatload of speedruns, and follow the scene (and the drama in it) reasonably closely... and I think how things played out with Dream, and how unprecedented this investigation was, says a lot. Things seem to mostly operate on trust in the speedrun community, and unless something really stands out as being way too lucky, or a legitimate reason to doubt a run's authenticity or runner's honesty pops up, they're mostly just accepted as being in good faith. Although I'm sure a runner's history with the community, and them having a large catalogue of previously recorded runs in a game (or others like it), lends a lot more credibility to their submissions and expedites the run acceptance process.

          5 votes