9 votes

The case for being a medical conservative

5 comments

  1. skybrian
    Link
    From the article:

    From the article:

    Medical conservatives are not nihilists. We appreciate progress and laud scientific gains that have transformed once-deadly diseases, such as AIDS and many forms of cancer, into manageable chronic conditions. And in public health, we recognize that reducing exposure to tobacco smoke and removal of trans fats from the food supply have contributed to the secular decrease in cardiac event rates.2 Indeed, medical science has made this era a great time to live.

    The medical conservative, however, recognizes that many developments promoted as medical advances offer, at best, marginal benefits. [...] On the flat part of the curve, additional spending, whether it be on a new drug, device, or diagnostic test, confers little benefit to individual patients or society.

    5 votes
  2. [4]
    retiredrugger
    Link
    I like it, but for medical conservatism to really take hold within the industry it needs to begin within academia. While med-school students are studying to become physicians they should have a...

    I like it, but for medical conservatism to really take hold within the industry it needs to begin within academia. While med-school students are studying to become physicians they should have a guiding philosophy which teaches them not just to care for the body, but to recognize the individual benefits and risks they give each patient. I'll try and find the source on it later, but I remember reading that coming into contact with the United States health care system accounted for 10% of all deaths within the country. That's a disgusting figure and is indicative not of patient care, but of the brutal inefficiency of privatized health care and the pursuit of profits above all else.

    4 votes
    1. reese
      Link Parent
      Anecdotal, but I tried to come up with a regular family doctor late last year. I had some concerns, but was really just interested in preventative care more than anything. I ended up seeing the...

      Anecdotal, but I tried to come up with a regular family doctor late last year. I had some concerns, but was really just interested in preventative care more than anything. I ended up seeing the clinic's physician assistant twice. Okay, whatever, I don't care what her job title is. Must know more about medicine and the human body than I do, I figured; however, this so-called medical professional did not seem to give a shit about me nor my symptoms. You're fine, she said with a smug, knowing smirk.

      Well, last week I got a second opinion, and all I'll say for now is thank fuck I did.

      So I don't know anything about that stat you threw out there, but I wouldn't be surprised if deaths caused by mere contact with the medical system are mostly people who settle for a garbage provider, maybe because they don't know, or they can't afford to get a second opinion, or they don't have enough time to seek other opinions, etc. Misdiagnosis must account for a ridiculous number of deaths per year, but I'm sure the lack of any diagnosis whatsoever, for people regularly receiving "care," is quite high.

      4 votes
    2. skybrian
      Link Parent
      I'd be interested in how they corrected that statistic for selection bias. It seems likely that coming in contact with the medical system indicates some kind of medical problem, and chances are...

      I'd be interested in how they corrected that statistic for selection bias. It seems likely that coming in contact with the medical system indicates some kind of medical problem, and chances are that if you have one medical problem you have others, maybe more serious ones?

      2 votes