7 votes

Facing segregated schools, parents took integration into their own hands. It’s working

2 comments

  1. [2]
    dubteedub
    Link
    I am really intrested to see what comes from this initiative. It seems like the original system used here was basically setting lower achieving students on a path to failure based on their middle...

    For years, the district used a competitive admissions process that ranked students based on test scores and attendance rates, giving rise to segregated schools even in a racially and socioeconomically mixed district.

    District 15 includes mostly white and middle class schools in Park Slope, as well as schools with large Hispanic populations in Sunset Park and schools with mostly black students in Red Hook. Students will now be admitted into middle schools according to a lottery, and each school has to set aside about half of its seats for students who are low-income, homeless or learning English.

    I am really intrested to see what comes from this initiative.

    It seems like the original system used here was basically setting lower achieving students on a path to failure based on their middle school test scores. Sorting lower achieving students together just seems like it would make it that much harder for students to dig their way out and succeed when all they are exposed to is other students at their level, along with the obvious issues of this system segregating schools along lines of class and race.

    3 votes
    1. alt-account
      (edited )
      Link Parent
      As am I! My personal experience of the education system prior to university was unpleasant, to say the least, and at the time I would have given anything to escape the anti-intellectualism and...

      I am really intrested to see what comes from this initiative.

      As am I!

      My personal experience of the education system prior to university was unpleasant, to say the least, and at the time I would have given anything to escape the anti-intellectualism and disruption around me - I literally dreamed of an ability streamed system, so reading about the opposite framed in such positive terms was a surprisingly visceral experience.

      Of course, as an adult I realise that it's a far more complex issue, and that achievement grouping is more likely to end up with the lower achievers being given up on, rather than given the extra support they need. Add the correlation between socioeconomic status and achievement, and a whole new level of practical and ethical concerns opens up. As the "poor, smart kid", I arguably would have had the most to gain from an ability grouped system.

      I don't entirely know where I'm going with this. I mean it very genuinely when I say that I'm interested to see what happens - and I certainly don't claim to have a magical solution (or even one better than what they're trying now). I guess I just hope it turns out to be a way to help everyone, rather than dragging every student toward the middle.

      [Edit] Typos

      4 votes