14 votes

An Alabama “ISIS Bride” Wants To Come Home. Can We Forgive Her Horrifying Social Media Posts?

8 comments

  1. [3]
    Loire Link
    Every bone in my body says let these people rot. But she is an American citizen, and American citizens have a right to return to the country (and be prosecuted for their crimes). We don't get to...

    Every bone in my body says let these people rot.

    But she is an American citizen, and American citizens have a right to return to the country (and be prosecuted for their crimes). We don't get to reject citizenship because of criminality or ideology. If citizenship is a right to be removed, then we have no rights at all.

    10 votes
    1. [3]
      Comment deleted by author
      Link Parent
      1. [2]
        Loire Link Parent
        Yes I did and that's the argument the Trump government is making against her. Did you read beyond the article? She was born in New Jersey. Her father was no longer a diplomat at the time of her...

        Yes I did and that's the argument the Trump government is making against her.

        Did you read beyond the article? She was born in New Jersey. Her father was no longer a diplomat at the time of her birth. The argument the Trump administration is making is that his termination paperwork was not completed by the time of her birth making him a de facto diplomat at the time. It's legally precarious. She lived in the States for 20 years before she took off to Syria. She held an American passport.

        11 votes
        1. SunSpotter Link Parent
          It's obvious the government doesn't want her back and is just playing a game to deny her reentry. Even still, its hard for me to feel sorry for her, but I worry about the precedents being set with...

          It's obvious the government doesn't want her back and is just playing a game to deny her reentry.

          Even still, its hard for me to feel sorry for her, but I worry about the precedents being set with cases like this.

          3 votes
  2. hereticalgorithm (edited ) Link
    This process of radicalization reminds me a ton of the stuff we'd see on the chans: Appeal to existing religious beliefs (QAnon's use of Christological imagry) Egging on real-life action (/pol/...

    This process of radicalization reminds me a ton of the stuff we'd see on the chans:

    Appeal to existing religious beliefs (QAnon's use of Christological imagry)

    Egging on real-life action (/pol/ celebrating their two recent mass shooters)

    Calculated use of escalation, using more respectable (alt-lite) figures as an intro to more serious shit:

    What I found was that Muthana had removed herself from her IRL community and had been pulled into her online community — at first the Muslim "Twittersphere," as she called it, and then, slowly, the networks of women ISIS members. On the ground in Alabama, I was following a ghost. She told me that she purposefully removed herself from her community once she had the clandestine agency to establish a social media presence. At first, it was one that included her siblings, her acquaintances from the mosque, her school friends — and those who knew her in real life and on social media told me that she purposefully created a “better” version of herself for Twitter, one that gained thousands of followers. Then that version of herself connected with radicals — and slowly began to share their way of thinking.

    8 votes
  3. Birb Link
    Wow, what an incredible article. I don't think her citizenship should be denied, but undoubtedly she should face repercussions for her actions. I'm curious what all she experienced while in Syria;...

    Wow, what an incredible article. I don't think her citizenship should be denied, but undoubtedly she should face repercussions for her actions. I'm curious what all she experienced while in Syria; her interactions with the journalist were interesting.

    4 votes
  4. [3]
    svenkatesh Link
    Shouldn't these ISIS brides be prosecuted for treason?

    Shouldn't these ISIS brides be prosecuted for treason?

    3 votes
    1. [2]
      temporalarcheologist Link Parent
      legally? they probably should, but after reading the article I think non fighters should be given an avenue to come back now that ISIS is for the most part done

      legally? they probably should, but after reading the article I think non fighters should be given an avenue to come back now that ISIS is for the most part done

      1 vote
      1. alyaza Link Parent
        also, i doubt anybody would bother to prosecute them even if you presume they could be prosecuted because it'd be a giant headache for basically no payoff. treason is difficult to prove even by...

        legally? they probably should, but after reading the article I think non fighters should be given an avenue to come back now that ISIS is for the most part done

        also, i doubt anybody would bother to prosecute them even if you presume they could be prosecuted because it'd be a giant headache for basically no payoff. treason is difficult to prove even by the already difficult standards of the legal system, and on the whole ISIS militants who leave the group are just such small fish that it'd be a waste of effort and probably taxpayer money. it's not like they have the significance or knowledge of abu bakr al-baghdadi, after all.

        2 votes