SunSpotter's recent activity

  1. Comment on ‘It’s unbearable’: in ever-hotter US cities, air conditioning is no longer enough in ~enviro

    SunSpotter
    Link Parent
    I don’t think that’s the case. A difference of 40°F is huge to a person but nothing to an engine block. If anything failed it would be the inverter and other electrical components. Which a solar...

    I don’t think that’s the case. A difference of 40°F is huge to a person but nothing to an engine block. If anything failed it would be the inverter and other electrical components. Which a solar setup would also have, along with batteries which will want to stay in a specific temperature range that varies by manufacturer. So I don’t think solar is inherently more heat resistant.

    I’m sure there are cheapo consumer grade generators out there that would fail in warm weather conditions, but I doubt that’s the norm. At the very least, I have a fair amount of experience with big commercial grade generators and I know those things can operate in all kinds of crazy conditions. So even consumer grade products should be somewhat resilient if they’re designed right.

    The main benefit of solar is that you can run it continuously without worry once it’s setup, since it doesn’t need fuel or produce emissions. But if you were purely concerned with emergency power, I probably wouldn’t recommend it just because of the added expense and complexity.

    17 votes
  2. Comment on The dearMoon project and mission has officially been cancelled in ~space

    SunSpotter
    Link Parent
    What a bummer this must be for the eight passengers who were selected. As far as I’m aware these are not super privileged or important people, just artists the billionaire in question seemed to...

    What a bummer this must be for the eight passengers who were selected. As far as I’m aware these are not super privileged or important people, just artists the billionaire in question seemed to appreciate.

    Maybe the idea of having your one ticket to space cancelled on you hits harder to me, as someone who grew up fascinated with space. But I can’t help but think that for a few years at least these people would wake up thinking they will soon be going to space, a privilege previously reserved for only a very select few. That has to have some kind of effect on you.

    5 votes
  3. Comment on US sues Hyundai for child labor in Alabama in ~transport

    SunSpotter
    Link
    While there is obviously a lot of room for blame on Hyundai here due to the obvious lack background checks done, and the implication that they may have even turned a blind eye initially, I find...

    A Reuters investigation revealed the widespread and illegal employment of migrant children in Alabama factories

    While there is obviously a lot of room for blame on Hyundai here due to the obvious lack background checks done, and the implication that they may have even turned a blind eye initially, I find the broader implications much more upsetting.

    This has been a developing story for a couple years now, and I have seen numerous articles placing blame on Hyundai (not that they don’t deserve it) but I have yet to see an article put pressure on Alabama itself.

    Laws are only as good as their enforcement. That means there needs to be real penalties for serious violations, and potential offenders need to feel like they have a real chance of being caught. Which in turn means, you have to actually catch businesses and hold them to the law. That all these child labor violations happened in one state is absolutely not a coincidence. I believe the state was complicit in this to some degree, and knew it was going on.

    I’d bet money there was some poor state worker out there who knew exactly what was going on and didn’t agree with it, and was haunted by the fact they couldn’t do anything about it. What could have led to that is pure speculation, but it’s not hard to imagine.

    Alabama is a fairly regressive state with serious brain drain, lots of small isolated towns and an overall poor state budget that relies on federal revenue to keep it afloat. They may have hamstrung their own regulatory efforts purposefully in order to encourage more business to invest in the state. They may not have wanted to hurt small businesses already helping prop up the economy of poor isolated towns. They may have simply crippled whatever task force would normally be in charge of child labor violations because it wouldn’t fit in the budget.

    Whatever actually happened, I do not believe this just was just some big accident that came out of nowhere, and I feel that someone should be held responsible for allowing this to happen.

    17 votes
  4. Comment on The inside story of Elon Musk’s mass firings of Tesla Supercharger staff in ~transport

    SunSpotter
    Link
    Thought I’d post this since I don’t think I’ve seen it brought up on Tildes yet. I drive a Non-Tesla EV so this doesn’t affect me directly, but I do hope it doesn’t end up burning people looking...

    Thought I’d post this since I don’t think I’ve seen it brought up on Tildes yet. I drive a Non-Tesla EV so this doesn’t affect me directly, but I do hope it doesn’t end up burning people looking to buy a car with a NACS port, because I really want to see the market continue to innovate and get better. I’m interested in hearing what other Tilderinos think though. Big deal? Not a big deal? Somewhere in between?

    17 votes
  5. Comment on Thoughts on the current state of discoverability and search in ~tech

    SunSpotter
    Link Parent
    I would really like someone to develop a Search Engine De-optimization tool. It seems like it would be doable with some kind of AI filter, since most SEO content is often low quality, irrelevant...

    I would really like someone to develop a Search Engine De-optimization tool. It seems like it would be doable with some kind of AI filter, since most SEO content is often low quality, irrelevant or trying to sell you something. And there is plenty of data out there to train on.

    I know this is similar to what Google is proposing, but they were the ones that incentivized SEO in the first place and got us into this mess. There’s also been some more recent accusations that Google has switched from being focused on search quality, to focusing on user interaction and profit generation, which happened right around the time many people started noticing a decrease in search quality. Soooo, not sure how much I trust Googles implementation.

    I want something that specifically goes to bat against SEO. Bonus points for easily being able to filter out entire websites (looking at you Pinterest). Overall, I imagine it working much like an ad-blocker but for search results.

    I would pay money for this.

    2 votes
  6. Comment on This YouTuber has been uploading Half-Life 3 ‘updates’ every day for over six years in ~games

    SunSpotter
    Link Parent
    As an uninformed person who has never played HL but is interested in the series…is Alyx not just Half Life 3 by another name?

    As an uninformed person who has never played HL but is interested in the series…is Alyx not just Half Life 3 by another name?

    1 vote
  7. Comment on US Federal Trade Commission bans new noncompete agreements in ~life

    SunSpotter
    Link Parent
    Yeah, I confused myself on that one, sorry about that it was quite the long day for me. Two of those jobs had both an NDA and a non-compete, and one was just a non-compete. I stand by my statement...

    Yeah, I confused myself on that one, sorry about that it was quite the long day for me. Two of those jobs had both an NDA and a non-compete, and one was just a non-compete. I stand by my statement that all those except for the one design job I had were not justified though.

    2 votes
  8. Comment on US Federal Trade Commission bans new noncompete agreements in ~life

    SunSpotter
    Link Parent
    Even in California, 3/4 of my last jobs have all had some kind of NDA. Of the three, only one seemed reasonable since it was a really niche industry with a ton of competition and I had a position...

    Even in California, 3/4 of my last jobs have all had some kind of NDA. Of the three, only one seemed reasonable since it was a really niche industry with a ton of competition and I had a position that actually required me to understand how everything worked. The other two were complete jokes just meant to scare people.

  9. Comment on Where are you on the spectrum of vacation planning? Detailed to the hour or floating like a leaf in the wind? in ~travel

    SunSpotter
    Link
    Echoing the thoughts of many in this thread, I’d say somewhere in the middle. I like to plan out the general idea, like where we’re going and how we’re getting there. Then I try to get an idea of...

    Echoing the thoughts of many in this thread, I’d say somewhere in the middle. I like to plan out the general idea, like where we’re going and how we’re getting there. Then I try to get an idea of who or what we want to visit while we’re there. If there’s a LOT of interesting things to see we’re both interested in, I might even make a list and try to keep track of when things are available. But ultimately, it’s all non-committal and nothing is planned down to the hour. It’s more like “hey it would be really cool if we have the time to see this”.

    I prefer this, because I feel like it motivates us to actually get off our butts and do something, rather than sit around in the hotel room. Both of our families plan their vacations very differently, but I’ve noticed both of them suffer from this problem. My parents plan out their departure to the dot but never know what to do once they actually arrive. My SOs parents are more leaf on the wind, but still suffer from the problem of not knowing what to do if say the weather turns or someone cancels on them. So for us, having a vague action plan has kind of worked as the best of both worlds because it gives us an idea of what to do, but also flexibility.

    1 vote
  10. Comment on I grew up in Michigan but currently live in Georgia. My GF and I are looking at buying a house, and both states have first time home buyer incentives, but they're income based. in ~finance

    SunSpotter
    Link
    It’s really only fraud if she’s your wife or domestic partner who you’ve been filing taxes jointly with and you lie about that. Otherwise…it’s a grey area. I’ve looked into doing exactly this, but...

    It’s really only fraud if she’s your wife or domestic partner who you’ve been filing taxes jointly with and you lie about that.

    Otherwise…it’s a grey area. I’ve looked into doing exactly this, but with a USDA direct loan rather than with a cash incentive program (because there aren’t many available in my area right now). So a lot of what I have to say will be based on that. However, I believe it’s a similar situation because USDA loans are also income restricted and have limited funding much like many of these first time buyer incentive programs.

    The short answer is, if you don’t have any shared finances like a car, personal loan, credit card etc, then go for it. Be prepared for them to scour your financial history either way though. They may even ask about her directly, and why you aren’t signing together. Ultimately, it’s up to you how you want to handle that. I’ve heard several people say they chose to live separately while the paperwork was going through because they didn’t want to lie or complicate the situation further.

    I heard it said by someone who pulled this off, that the bank, the underwriter and everyone involved in approving you, can’t predict the future, especially not when it comes to relationships. People do all kinds of irrational things when it comes to their relationships, and it’s not worth someone’s time to prove that you didn’t really break up and decide to get get back together later or something along those lines.

    If you do have a long history of shared finances, it might be more complicated. I would probably caution you to look more deeply into the specific programs you’re thinking of going with and ask around to see if anyone has experience with them. At worst, they should just deny you though. Again, it’s probably not worth anyone’s time to go after some person and their girlfriend who for personal reasons didn’t sign the paperwork together.

    5 votes
  11. Comment on 5.25-inch floppy disks expected to help run San Francisco trains until 2030 in ~transport

    SunSpotter
    Link Parent
    Actually IDE is a 40 pin header that post-dates and is not compatible with the 32 pin floppy header. Would be great if that weren’t true though, could just pop a compact flash card in the system...

    Actually IDE is a 40 pin header that post-dates and is not compatible with the 32 pin floppy header. Would be great if that weren’t true though, could just pop a compact flash card in the system with nothing but a little adapter and you would be good to go.

    There really isn’t a good commercially viable way to implement a physical adapter for a floppy drive to something more modern like a flash drive unfortunately. They’re out there, but usually only sold in low quantities to collectors and small businesses.

    4 votes
  12. Comment on Trying to get a better idea of what goes into having a house built in ~life.home_improvement

    SunSpotter
    Link Parent
    Update: Spoke with another dealer today and asked them about this, and yes your contractor will be expected to actually get the house on whatever foundation you plan to build. The shipper will get...

    Update:
    Spoke with another dealer today and asked them about this, and yes your contractor will be expected to actually get the house on whatever foundation you plan to build. The shipper will get each section as close as they can when dropping off your home, but that's it. At that point, it will be up to your contractor to scoot each section into place and join them together. The sales rep I spoke with today indicated this is probably the most important part of your build, in the sense that if you had to hire one person who really knows what they're doing, it's the person who joins the house together.

    1 vote
  13. Comment on EV bargains to be found as Hertz sells off some of its US electric cars in ~transport

    SunSpotter
    Link Parent
    This is kind of the problem with all EVs right now, and even the car market at large. At least where I live new $20k cars are few and far between. With EVs typically costing $5-10k more than their...

    This is kind of the problem with all EVs right now, and even the car market at large. At least where I live new $20k cars are few and far between. With EVs typically costing $5-10k more than their ICE equivalent, it becomes even rarer to see something in that price range. I think the bottom end Nissan Leaf is the only thing I’m aware of, barring something on a huge sale. I love EVs, but I do worry about how young families will afford cars in the future as states like California move towards ending ICE sales in the next 10-15 years.

    5 votes
  14. Comment on X4: Foundations 7.00 trailer in ~games

    SunSpotter
    Link Parent
    FYI, since you mentioned you have a Steam Deck, it’s definitely playable on the Steam Deck, but it’s going to be a little rough. I recommend enabling some sort of AI upscaling to improve frame...

    FYI, since you mentioned you have a Steam Deck, it’s definitely playable on the Steam Deck, but it’s going to be a little rough. I recommend enabling some sort of AI upscaling to improve frame rate without cranking the resolution to complete potato quality. Even still there will probably be some fuzziness to distant objects and text because FSR and XeSS are not perfect.

    2 votes
  15. Comment on Trying to get a better idea of what goes into having a house built in ~life.home_improvement

    SunSpotter
    Link Parent
    It's a good question, and to be honest I'm not sure how much your contractor would be required to assist with actually getting the house on the foundation vs how much the shipper and their team...

    It's a good question, and to be honest I'm not sure how much your contractor would be required to assist with actually getting the house on the foundation vs how much the shipper and their team would handle it. Regardless, installing the home is still going to be an additional cost beyond the purchase price of the house.

    The cost you pay for a manufactured home, is really just for the home. If a dealer says you can buy home model XXX for $200,000 they really just mean you have permission to take it off the lot for $200,000. They will work with you to have your home shipped, but you will pay for the shipping yourself. Which is also why you shouldn't need to cover shipping damage, because it's covered by the overall shipping cost.

    As far as I'm aware, everything else will be arranged by you and a general contractor. You will need to pay to have the site cleared and graded, assuming it's not just plain, flat dirt. You will need to pay for utilities to be brought to your site, assuming you aren't going off the grid, and lastly you will need to pay to have the foundation built. All that needs to happen before the house arrives. If your city/county is lax on permitting, you might be able to get the house installed without a traditional concrete foundation? But I haven't looked into that much because I know I couldn't get away with that where I live.

    Assuming you can find cheap enough land large enough to accommodate the manufactured home you want, it's still not a bad option compared to the cost of houses in a high cost of living area.

    1 vote
  16. Comment on Trying to get a better idea of what goes into having a house built in ~life.home_improvement

    SunSpotter
    Link Parent
    Just wanted to clarify a few terms here because I've been looking into the same idea as OP as a first time home buyer. There's three main types of pre-fabricated homes, at least here in the US:...
    • Exemplary

    Just wanted to clarify a few terms here because I've been looking into the same idea as OP as a first time home buyer.

    There's three main types of pre-fabricated homes, at least here in the US:

    1. Mobile homes. True mobile homes are not made in the US anymore, meaning you can only buy something classified as a mobile home if it was built before the 1970's. These are also exactly what most people picture when they hear the word 'mobile home'. They're almost always single-wide structures that sit on top of a skirt to hide the trailer they sit on. If your intention is to buy one used and ship it out to a vacant lot, you should be prepared to pay cash as financing will be difficult. A lot of low-income or first time buyer programs also straight up disqualify mobile homes from financing. This is probably the option with the least customization, since it will be an existing structure and permitting extensions will be tricky.

    2. Manufactured homes. These are usually two-section (double-wide) homes that are 'married' together on site, though they can be up to three or four sections. They can also be single-wide, but these often come with similar financing restrictions to traditional mobile homes. Your state also may or may not allow you to buy directly from the manufacturer, instead forcing you to buy from a local dealer instead. I still recommend talking directly with the manufacturer anyways though, just to get an idea of what they're like and what an ideal home from them with no travel damage looks like. I also recommend asking if they use standard parts and door frames for their homes. A common complaint on mobile homes and older manufactured homes is that you can't just go down to home depot to replace a broken door or window because it's not a standard size. I know my local manufacturers stopped doing this, but I would check to be sure with your local companies. On the topic of shipping damage, note that there WILL be travel damage in your home, I've been assured it's all covered in the buying process and will be repaired on-site but I would double check with whoever you buy from. You will have some amount of customization options, but they will be limited. I know when I talked to a local manufacturer they said they were able to customize the floor plan of the home if desired, like take out a corner to accommodate a nearby tree, add a porch or tweak interior walls, but for the most part you are restricted to customizing the existing floor space. You can't add more unless you want to move up to a model with another section. They also like to advertise the more expensive models with an attached garage, but you'll need to be aware this is not a structure or service they provide, you will need to arrange something with the contractor you hire to install the home. When you start building, you can build an in-set into the foundation, allowing the home to sit more or less flush which reduces the mobile home-ness of the appearance, but it's all about preference.

    3. Modular homes. The name is a little confusing since it's similar to a manufactured home, but the 'modules' of these houses are pre-made wall segments, sections of the roof etc that are shipped to the site and installed on a foundation. I've had a hard time finding a company that specializes in these homes in my area so I have less knowledge of them, but my understanding is that these are essentially just normal houses. If you can find a company building these in your area, they will probably have a catalogue of existing floor plans, but they have the greatest flexibility in customization because again they're really not too different from a normal home. You can also get them built as a single story, two story, have an attached garage, all the things available in a normal home. Note that this is also the most expensive option though. It's going to be less than a traditional stick-built home but not by as much as a manufactured home.

    Honorable mention to Insulated Concrete Form (ICF) homes, which are made of blocks of polystyrene foam with space in between to pour a concrete wall. Like a modular home, the polystyrene blocks ship from a factory and are installed on a foundation. They're also fairly customizable like a modular home, but it can be pretty hard to find a company experienced with building a home this way. Overall, this building method seems to be more expensive than traditional stick built homes, with the trade-off of being more weather/fire resistant and having better energy efficiency.

    4 votes
  17. Comment on Fisker's EV prices slashed by up to $24,000, Tesla freezes them as trades in ~transport

    SunSpotter
    Link Parent
    At a certain price point I suppose a car is a car. Even if some of the bells and whistles don't work, $37k for what's supposed to be high-end EV is a fantastic deal. Even $25k for a low-end EV is...

    At a certain price point I suppose a car is a car. Even if some of the bells and whistles don't work, $37k for what's supposed to be high-end EV is a fantastic deal. Even $25k for a low-end EV is almost unheard of outside of compact EVs like the Leaf. These prices would also explain why I've suddenly seen a Fisker EV in my area for the first time. I could easily see the logic stopping here for a lot of people, making them think it's a good deal.

    The lack of future updates and dealer service is definitely...concerning from a safety and security standpoint. But what makes this a complete non-starter to me is really just the upcoming lack of parts. Tesla's and other smaller EV makers are already notoriously expensive to fix, even for minor fender benders. If Fisker were to go full chapter 7, whatever parts inventory they maintain now is probably going to become even more fractious and hard to source. People might just be stuck with any minor damage caused in traffic, and end up with a totaled car if it requires actual repairs. I have to guess that this will also go into the risk assessment for an auto-insurer, though it's hard to say how much it would affect the total insurance cost.

    8 votes
  18. Comment on Nobody warned electric vehicle owners how quickly they would burn through tires in ~transport

    SunSpotter
    Link Parent
    I drive an EV6, and I know most EVs handle regenerative breaking differently, but you can completely turn it off in my car and I don’t believe it’s unique in that way? You can also crank it up to...

    I drive an EV6, and I know most EVs handle regenerative breaking differently, but you can completely turn it off in my car and I don’t believe it’s unique in that way?

    You can also crank it up to maximum while say driving down a mountain road to help charge your battery. It’s up to the user how much or how little they want.

    3 votes
  19. Comment on State Farm shedding 72,000 home insurance policies in California in ~finance

    SunSpotter
    Link Parent
    Wow that’s…insane. I can’t say I’m surprised rates went up, my insurance guy basically said they would and AAA wouldn’t stay competitive forever. But $800/mo is crazy, it’s about what I pay for...

    Wow that’s…insane.

    I can’t say I’m surprised rates went up, my insurance guy basically said they would and AAA wouldn’t stay competitive forever. But $800/mo is crazy, it’s about what I pay for car + insurance combined. Did you happen to ask why it was so much? Because if that’s really just the state of the market, it makes me a little fearful of having to renew this year…

    6 votes