24 votes

The Supreme Court will hear Google’s appeal in the long-running copyright/API dispute with Oracle

6 comments

  1. [4]
    vord
    Link
    Sadly, I don't have much faith that the Supreme Court will judge correctly. Oracle is a bad-faith player here, trying to set a legal precedent for copyright to over APIs, which have never been...

    Sadly, I don't have much faith that the Supreme Court will judge correctly. Oracle is a bad-faith player here, trying to set a legal precedent for copyright to over APIs, which have never been copyrightable.

    Oracle is dying because nobody wants to pay their exorbitant costs. Newer companies avoid them completely, and older companies are replacing their legacy systems with far cheaper options. There will someday be a tipping point where Oracle raises prices high enough (trying to make up for lost customer base) that their remaining customers ditch them en-mass, and the company will collapse unless they're able to sustain revenue purely through copyright/patent litigation.

    You wanna know the real reason this lawsuit is so important to Oracle, beyond being able to collect billions from Google? This exists, and is getting better all the time: https://www.enterprisedb.com/enterprise-postgres/database-compatibility-oracle

    They want that product dead, because it can smooth the migration away from Oracle. Without being able to copyright APIs, they don't have legal standing to do so.

    16 votes
    1. [3]
      Akir
      Link Parent
      Honestly, the world would be a better place without Oracle. What are they actually contributing to society at this point? This lawsuit marks the beginning of when they turned into a patent troll,...

      Honestly, the world would be a better place without Oracle. What are they actually contributing to society at this point? This lawsuit marks the beginning of when they turned into a patent troll, except they are actively making the world a worse place by bringing APIs in to the world of copyright.

      I am still so upset about how they have completely trashed all of Sun's legacy. Sun was always doing exciting things and spending millions on research, and they ended up opening up much of their IP in order to make the fruit of that research more available to everyone. Oracle has since trashed all of their major achievements; they stopped development on SPARC, they closed open development on Solaris, and they have basically washed their hands of Java except for their enterprise customers. Oracle is just another conman looking for companies with more money than sense.

      12 votes
      1. [2]
        vord
        Link Parent
        Oh Java is worse than that. Starting with Java 8 onwards, if you want to use Oracle JDK as an organization, you have to pay some hefty licensing costs. I believe Java was the main reason Oracle...

        Oh Java is worse than that. Starting with Java 8 onwards, if you want to use Oracle JDK as an organization, you have to pay some hefty licensing costs. I believe Java was the main reason Oracle bought Sun...on top of the IP treasure trove.

        3 votes
        1. Akir
          Link Parent
          Trust me, I'm well aware and it's one of the reasons why I've basically given up on Java. Nobody seems to want to even bother with it anymore. Ironically, I recently heard someone quoting that the...

          Trust me, I'm well aware and it's one of the reasons why I've basically given up on Java. Nobody seems to want to even bother with it anymore.

          Ironically, I recently heard someone quoting that the most widely installed version of the Java JDK was version 8 and used it as an allusion to how enterprise software moves slowly. I thought it was funny that they didn't know that it was because that was when Oracle decided to throw the sword of Damocles at it.

          2 votes
  2. [2]
    ThatFanficGuy
    Link
    Off-the-topic, I like this article's structure. "What's been happening", "Why we're reporting on this now", "What the sides of the story are" (in this case: what each company is saying on the...

    Off-the-topic, I like this article's structure. "What's been happening", "Why we're reporting on this now", "What the sides of the story are" (in this case: what each company is saying on the situation), and "If you're interested in the topic, read this".

    11 votes
    1. Deimos
      Link Parent
      Yeah, Axios uses a similar structure for a lot of their articles. Like I mentioned the other day, they've become one of my favorite news sources recently.

      Yeah, Axios uses a similar structure for a lot of their articles. Like I mentioned the other day, they've become one of my favorite news sources recently.

      6 votes