vord's recent activity

  1. Comment on If Zoom is wrong, so is Apple in ~tech

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    This comes as no surprise. My friends wholehearted believe that Apple's products are inheritly more secure, simply because they dictate the ecosystem from top to bottom. I counter with the open vs...

    This comes as no surprise. My friends wholehearted believe that Apple's products are inheritly more secure, simply because they dictate the ecosystem from top to bottom.

    I counter with the open vs closed source security debate (which I won't get into here, but I am firmly in the 'open' camp), and follow with:

    I fundementally trust Apple even less than Google, for some odd reasons. Apple gets your data incidentally as part of their regular operations, and thus don't have any reason to protect it beyond not getting sued...it's an added cost to protect your data.

    Google, on the other hand, is intentionally grabbing as much data as they can, but they do have a big motivation to protect that data, as targetting ads with that data is their main profit generator.

    If Apple's data on you leaks, it's a bad PR story. If Google's data leaks, they've lost their business model because nobody has to go through Google anymore.

    That being said, neither should be trusted because of the police/surveillance state.

    Google at least provides me an option to opt-out of their data collection on their hardware, by providing me an unlocked bootloader and ability to flash my own OS.

    So given the choice between Apple and Google for phone hardware, I'm choosing Google every time.

    10 votes
  2. Comment on Bitcoin mining's three-body problem - An analysis of the three principal forces that drive the mining industry in ~tech

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    That already exists: it's called the USD (or any other country's currency). Or the points you get as rewards from a credit card, or miles from an airline. They are all functionally currencies with...

    simply having all coins pre-owned by a central authority, but then there are problems with trust that can completely tank the entire currency.

    That already exists: it's called the USD (or any other country's currency). Or the points you get as rewards from a credit card, or miles from an airline. They are all functionally currencies with a central authority.

    A cryptocurrency is essentially just a financial ledger being distributed in a way that makes it verifiable with no central authority. If you remove the decentralized nature of it, you've removed the entire reason it exists.

    1 vote
  3. Comment on Bitcoin mining's three-body problem - An analysis of the three principal forces that drive the mining industry in ~tech

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    I hadn't looked into POS before, and it's certainly an interesting development I hadn't researched before. A cursory glance it does make me wary of it. You must get a stake in the currency to earn...

    I hadn't looked into POS before, and it's certainly an interesting development I hadn't researched before. A cursory glance it does make me wary of it. You must get a stake in the currency to earn currency, the more you have the more you earn. They even explicitly say that smaller networks are susceptible to various network takeovers by a large enough investor.

    Both POW and POS both suffer from the fact that they're essentially just another fiat currency with no inherit value, just with no central authority.

    Filecoin utilizes newer methods and ties the mining to an actual usable good: persistent storage of a user's data. It will be much closer to 'the gold standard' than existing cryptos. It will be able to be inflationary and deflationary (whereas Bitcoin is 100% deflationary).

    1 vote
  4. Comment on The case for reparations: We've had 250 years of slavery, 90 years of Jim Crow, 60 years of separate but equal and 35 years of racist housing policy. Without addressing this, the US can't move on in ~misc

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    I understand that it's not an easy task. But much like how religion's sway over people has been diminishing in the last 30 years or so (relative to the prior 2000+), racism will fade away if it...

    I understand that it's not an easy task. But much like how religion's sway over people has been diminishing in the last 30 years or so (relative to the prior 2000+), racism will fade away if it stops pulling in new recruits.

    4 votes
  5. Comment on The case for reparations: We've had 250 years of slavery, 90 years of Jim Crow, 60 years of separate but equal and 35 years of racist housing policy. Without addressing this, the US can't move on in ~misc

    vord
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    This is true, but many are lost causes without direct interaction with their chosen out-group, and the best way to defeat them is to keep them from recruiting more, and letting them die off over...

    I also believe that some people are just assholes and don't like folks who look different.

    This is true, but many are lost causes without direct interaction with their chosen out-group, and the best way to defeat them is to keep them from recruiting more, and letting them die off over time.

    It winds up having a very "all lives matter" tone to it, which I'm sure wasn't your intention.

    I did see the parallels there, and I'm going to attempt to elaborate why I feel they are different.

    Personal anecdote incoming...I saw three fundamental 'All Lives Matter' camps that emerged.

    1. Well-meaning, but ignorant folks who interpreted BLM as dismissive of their own problems, in part since they can't relate the problems to their own lives. They are racist due more to ignorance than seething hatred or ulterior motive. These are the most likely people who could be swayed to join BLM and other movements to fight for the oppressed with a re-framing of the message. M4A got a lot more universal support than 'Public Healthcare,' despite being essentially the same policy. 'Patriot Act' sounded a lot better than 'Broad power grab and enhancement of police state,' and thus passed without a hitch.

    2. People with an agenda who use leverage ignorance of Groups 1 and 3, and weaponize it to discredit their chosen out-groups and build support among Groups 1 and 3. This is the true enemy (or at least enablers for the enemy), and they are the most dangerous as they have a distinct motive to fan racial tensions instead of healing them.

    3. People who listen to Group 2 and take everything they say as gospel, and also tend to be the 'more racist' crowd. This group is also very unlikely to help, as they believe Group 2 with such veracity that they can't be reasoned with. My father is in this group, as in early 2016 he uttered the words 'I don't like Trump, but I can't vote for a Democrat,' as if he had a gun to his head. Less than a month after Trump became the nominee for the R ticket, those reservations disappeared and I watched my parents become more overtly racist.

    It's generally agreed that a broad level of support is needed to enact change (and not just pay it lip service). Of the people who are not already in the BLM camp, there is only one group to recruit more support from. In my experience, it's a hell of a lot easier to recruit their support by getting them to support policies which they also see benefits from, and the framing of said policy as more inclusive than exclusive. If the oppressed have been only earning a pittance, and the 'less brutally oppressed' have only been earning a pittance+5, does it matter the semantics of the policy if both groups end up at 10 instead of 1 or 6? There is the followup issue of making up for the +5 difference over time, but IMO getting support for the 'stop making disparity worse' is more important to enact first than the 'make up for past disparity.'

    The other reason to frame these policies as such, is that it limits Group 2 from using racist rhetoric as a weapon. If they try to re-frame a policy seen as a universal fix as a 'handout to minorities,' it forces them to be much more blatant about that racism, which makes it harder for them to recruit from Group 1 into Group 3.

    2 votes
  6. Comment on Bitcoin mining's three-body problem - An analysis of the three principal forces that drive the mining industry in ~tech

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    This is why I have higher hopes for https://filecoin.io/ By tying the currency primarily to a useful good (persistent storage), instead of an arbitrary hash rate, it breaks the energy consumption...

    This is why I have higher hopes for https://filecoin.io/

    By tying the currency primarily to a useful good (persistent storage), instead of an arbitrary hash rate, it breaks the energy consumption arms race. This also means that old mining setups aren't necessarily made obsolete by new miners.

    3 votes
  7. Comment on The case for reparations: We've had 250 years of slavery, 90 years of Jim Crow, 60 years of separate but equal and 35 years of racist housing policy. Without addressing this, the US can't move on in ~misc

    vord
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    Because it is a hard sell. If it wasn't, racism would have been solved long ago. You can't just tell someone 'abandon your thought process because you are wrong.' They will reject the notion, no...

    Why shouldn't people be made to consciously address past wrongs?

    Because it is a hard sell. If it wasn't, racism would have been solved long ago. You can't just tell someone 'abandon your thought process because you are wrong.' They will reject the notion, no matter the evidence against them.

    It's kind of like trying to rehabilitate an addict. No matter how much you are concerned, or you point out how much it is hurting themselves or others, an addict will not go on the road to recovery until they decide for themselves to improve.

    A racist, who is only perceiving that they are receiving help from other racists, will not reject racist thoughts until they see that the racist thoughts were not what was improving their lives.

    There are ways to facilitate this without directly addressing, like trying to suppress racist rhetoric. But doing so is a bigger uphill battle as then you're also setting yourself up to the 'you're against free speech' strawman which is super effective.

    All change requires compromise. I get told all the time 'you have to compromise <random principal> to get any progress made.' And in some senses they are right. I want to abolish private banking, but accept that it will not likely be accomplished without stepping stones in the right direction, as my stance is met with hard resistance from a large majority.

    6 votes
  8. Comment on The case for reparations: We've had 250 years of slavery, 90 years of Jim Crow, 60 years of separate but equal and 35 years of racist housing policy. Without addressing this, the US can't move on in ~misc

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    It's not about being soft on it. Soft on racism implies leaving racist policies in place, or putting new ones in place that are subtly racist. It's all about marketing a progressive change in a...

    involves being soft on racism rather than challenging it

    It's not about being soft on it. Soft on racism implies leaving racist policies in place, or putting new ones in place that are subtly racist.

    It's all about marketing a progressive change in a more inclusive way. A racist person will not support a policy that markets itself as 'improving lives of <oppressed group racist opposes>,' even if that policy would benefit them as well. A racist person will be far more likely support policies marketed as 'improving the lives of poor people,' especially if they are able to identify as one of them.

    It's one reason Affirmative Action hits hard resistance. Racists don't understand why it's necessary, and interpret it as '<outgroup> got a job that I should have gotten.' So you must build a policy that is inclusive of everyone (like raising minimum wage), that just incidentally happens to benefit the most-discriminated groups more.

    10 votes
  9. Comment on The case for reparations: We've had 250 years of slavery, 90 years of Jim Crow, 60 years of separate but equal and 35 years of racist housing policy. Without addressing this, the US can't move on in ~misc

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    To build on that a bit, that's precisely what I meant. Appeal to the Dixiecrats from a racist perspective, and the Republicans taking them over from a racist perspective is what perpetuates it....

    Your first statement seems to only hold water if this is a group drawn to racist acts

    To build on that a bit, that's precisely what I meant. Appeal to the Dixiecrats from a racist perspective, and the Republicans taking them over from a racist perspective is what perpetuates it.

    You must draw the racists away from the racist party with non-racist, but positive change. Only after they escape from the mindset of 'racism makes my life better' will they begin to stop being racist.

    Or, failing that, there is a better chance of at least causing racism to fade with the sands of time, much the way homophobia has (relative to before 1990's).

    10 votes
  10. Comment on The case for reparations: We've had 250 years of slavery, 90 years of Jim Crow, 60 years of separate but equal and 35 years of racist housing policy. Without addressing this, the US can't move on in ~misc

    vord
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    But it's not a change of subject. It's a chicken-egg problem, one that I would argue the wedge-users are making worse, as they are creating more racists, rather than letting racism fade away with...

    But it's not a change of subject. It's a chicken-egg problem, one that I would argue the wedge-users are making worse, as they are creating more racists, rather than letting racism fade away with the sands of time. They use racist rhetoric to garner support, and further re-enforce that racism when it works by throwing minor positive changes to their supporters (see: Bush & Trump tax cuts). This draws in more people to be racist, as they see that positive change, and thus fall susceptible to that same rhetoric.

    The first step isn't to try to yell at the whole racist population: 'Hey everybody, stop being racist!' The racists are in a positive feedback loop, and trying to yank them out of it will be seen as a direct attack on the few positive changes they've gotten. First we must break the racist feedback loop, by building a larger coalition. The current group of non-racists obviously isn't large enough to garner support for better policies...Medicare for all has almost double the support of reparations, and look how 'controversial' that is.

    The new coalition must consist of some of the current racists, as all of the non-racists are already part of that coalition. We must draw the racists out of their feedback loops, and to do that we must make their lives better so they stop listening to the people using racism as a wedge.

    From there, we can address the underlying racism directly. They'll have a bit of a better mental foundation to do so, as they'll have seen some positive change without racist rhetoric. Working with non-racists will also help, as face-to-face interaction with people outside racist circles will do far more to break down those barriers.

    9 votes
  11. Comment on The case for reparations: We've had 250 years of slavery, 90 years of Jim Crow, 60 years of separate but equal and 35 years of racist housing policy. Without addressing this, the US can't move on in ~misc

    vord
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    The article is a fantastic summary of so many of the abuses. But this one line does throw me off a bit. Part of the reason that racism has persisted for so long is that politicians would use it as...

    In substituting a broad class struggle for an anti-racist struggle, progressives hope to assemble a coalition by changing the subject.

    The article is a fantastic summary of so many of the abuses. But this one line does throw me off a bit.

    Part of the reason that racism has persisted for so long is that politicians would use it as a wedge to keep the lower classes divided. Irish/Chinese/Japanese/Black/Hispanic and so on were all immensely discriminated against at one point or another in the USA. Native Americans got screwed even harder, and IMO have an even stronger case for reparations. Early progressive movements were also split because of racism, and eventually were far more successful when the racism was set aside to work together against the upper classes.

    The race war is a class war. Building a stronger coalition to unify the lower classes will do far more to end racist policies sooner, and from there will build a more solid platform for reparations. So long as there are 'haves' and 'have nots,' the 'haves' will always try to pit the 'have nots' against each other to prevent them from looking at their common oppressor.

    Bernie Sanders is 100% behind reparations, if you read through his policies or follow his history. The issue is that using the word 'reparations' is political suicide, as sadly not many white people comprehend why reparations are incredibly important. Getting everybody on the same page (rich people are causing you more problems than <random outgroup>) is far more important in the early phases, especially when one party is fanning the flames of racial tension.

    Parting thought is that if wealth in USA was divided equally, every household would have over $240,000 of wealth. By my math...my household has approximately -$195,000 of wealth ($-250,000 at all time low) that I'm slowly working towards 0, as even making it to the top 20% doesn't afford me much ability to get out of the hole.

    24 votes
  12. Comment on Lenovo to certify their full ThinkPad and ThinkStation line for Linux in ~tech

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    This is fantastic news. I've owned Dells, Acers, and Sagers before. I've done work on Macs and misc others. But far and away the ThinkPad x395 is the best laptop I've ever used. It's lightweight...

    This is fantastic news. I've owned Dells, Acers, and Sagers before. I've done work on Macs and misc others. But far and away the ThinkPad x395 is the best laptop I've ever used. It's lightweight while still being fairly powerful. Very solid build, between the two in my house they've taken numerous drops and spills with 0 damage (admittedly most spills were handled quickly, and luckily usually on the top instead of inside). Battery life fantastic, they stay cool and quiet under most circumstances.

    I've been running OpenSUSE Tumbleweed for almost a full year now. It's been rolling the whole time, although there was a ~4-month period where there was an issue with the wireless card. The only persistent software issue relating to laptop hardware is that when docking or un-docking the thunderbolt jack is that I have to re-initialize USB devices, as they stop responding.

    If they fully certify all models going forward, it's more likely that my issues will get fixed upstream faster, and that is fantastic.

    5 votes
  13. Comment on An AMA with the developers of Lemmy, a federated open-source alternative to reddit in ~tech

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    That may be true of you personally, but for a large organization providing a free service funded through advertising, morals will often get thrown out the window if it will reduce userbase or...

    if I ever get to make a platform, I don’t want Nazis in there. Ever. It doesn’t matter if they don’t talk to me anymore, because the mere existence of their online community is a direct consequence of the rules I put forth. I wouldn’t want to provide them with a platform to harm society with their hate speech.

    That may be true of you personally, but for a large organization providing a free service funded through advertising, morals will often get thrown out the window if it will reduce userbase or interaction. This is doubly true for any publicly traded company, where duty to shareholders is priority #1.

    Reddit has no incentive to kick out the bigots unless a big enough PR disaster hits. Last major banwave for communities came after a huge amount of media attention, but little was done to prevent re-forming these groups after the hammer came down.

    2 votes
  14. Comment on An AMA with the developers of Lemmy, a federated open-source alternative to reddit in ~tech

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    It matters in the sense that if it's an OSI approved license, you know that the license confers the rights to modify and redistribute. Part of the reason that 'open source' was coined was to...

    Why does it matter if "open-source" is a precise term? That's exactly what licenses are for. They spell out the usage rights in no uncertain terms.

    It matters in the sense that if it's an OSI approved license, you know that the license confers the rights to modify and redistribute.

    Part of the reason that 'open source' was coined was to distinguish it from 'free software', where people often confused 'right to modify and redistribute' and 'free of charge.'

    Languages do evolve, but there are some substantial issues with that when taken to extremes. 'Literally' is one example, where the definition became the opposite because of incredibe misuse, and I have yet to find a term that equates to 'no I'm not being hyperbolic'.

    Open Source needs to have a firm definition to prevent it from being co-opted and abused, as an 'open source' license (as defined by the OSI) confers certain rights to the end users. If a company declares their license as open source, but doesn't include these rights, it dilutes the term into a mere buzzword and muddies the waters.

    It's the same reason I support a legal definition of milk as 'lactation from an animal'. Or chocolate as 'must contain at least X% cacao.'

    Without any sort of enforcements, it becomes easy for companies to decieve people into thinking they're getting something they aren't.

    Look at the whole gluten-free fad. Many gluten free products were being made that weren't safe for Celiacs to eat because they didn't follow proper precautions during preparation.

    I wouldn't put it past any of the largest tech companies to try to rebrand a 'look but don't touch' license as open source, which is antithical to the whole purpose of it. See Microsoft's bullshit about Office files being an 'open standard' when they were not anything of the sort when governments started requiring it.

    2 votes
  15. Comment on An AMA with the developers of Lemmy, a federated open-source alternative to reddit in ~tech

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    Maybe not most, but I've certainly seen my fair share of 'oh god reddit was down' posts. Being federated also makes it harder to block the whole ecosystem in the case of censorship.

    Maybe not most, but I've certainly seen my fair share of 'oh god reddit was down' posts.

    Being federated also makes it harder to block the whole ecosystem in the case of censorship.

    2 votes
  16. Comment on Sexism in technology in ~tech

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    So, if the similar disparities exist for all business sectors, isn't this just a systemic executive leadership problem? Not to say it isn't a big problem, but the article seems to frame it in a...

    National surveys have shown that similar disparities cross business sectors and Provinces throughout Canada

    So, if the similar disparities exist for all business sectors, isn't this just a systemic executive leadership problem? Not to say it isn't a big problem, but the article seems to frame it in a way that is exclusive to tech companies.

    If anything, I would assume that sexism would be a bigger problem as you go down the heirarchy. If co-workers don't value someone's option due to bigotry, they're less likely to move up the chain, and the problems get worse over time.

    I'm reminded of a phrase I heard along the lines of 'change must come from the bottom up.' It's a pretty good argument for starting to move to flatten org structures through methods such as strengthening unions and workplace democracy.

    3 votes
  17. Comment on Sexism in technology in ~tech

    vord
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    Thanks @DaveJarvis, issue resolved!

    Ugh, looks like the cert expired about an hour ago...can't get past the HSTS.

    Edit: Lynx works if I ignore all errors, yay!

    Thanks @DaveJarvis, issue resolved!

  18. Comment on Used-car prices bounce back after giving U.S. industry a scare in ~finance

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    But it's a net loss on demand that's dropping price to begin with. I personally think supply/demand is bunk, but in theory they should reach a stable equilibrium. Assembly line manufacture of cars...

    But it's a net loss on demand that's dropping price to begin with. I personally think supply/demand is bunk, but in theory they should reach a stable equilibrium.

    Assembly line manufacture of cars is a mostly an unskilled labor. I'm sure given appropriate funding, we could put that labor to better use.

    There's no reason unemployment needs to be as high as it is currently. There are endless useful tasks to be done, just that they're not immediately profitable so no businesses want to do them, or pay taxes to fund them collectively.

    1 vote
  19. Comment on Used-car prices bounce back after giving U.S. industry a scare in ~finance

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    I was specifically addressing the idea of reduced customer choice. I think we honestly have too many choices in that regard, and most of them boil down to minor differences that we attribute more...

    I'm not sure why this is such a concern.

    I was specifically addressing the idea of reduced customer choice.

    I think we honestly have too many choices in that regard, and most of them boil down to minor differences that we attribute more value to mostly due to marketing.

    3 votes
  20. Comment on An AMA with the developers of Lemmy, a federated open-source alternative to reddit in ~tech

    vord
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    So, it makes sense, as federation is really the main feature. One of the problems of Reddit is that it creates that central authority, and if Reddit goes down all of Reddit goes down. But there...

    So, it makes sense, as federation is really the main feature. One of the problems of Reddit is that it creates that central authority, and if Reddit goes down all of Reddit goes down.

    But there are some key features I like:

    • Clean, mobile-friendly interface. I despise that everything demands an App. Apps should be optional, not mandatory.
    • RSS / Atom feeds. It's a great system that has largely been abandoned, and would love to see a resurgence.
    • A similar post search when creating new posts. This is a huge feature. I would like to see it used so that X-Posts all merge to one comment thread. Also could be used to identify dupe content to weed out 'karma farmers'
    • Containerized Rust app that supports arm64 / Raspberry Pi. This is important for self-hosting, a Raspberry Pi can easily host a medium-sized community with a good net connection.

    I do dislike that it's an SPA, but very few non-technical users care about things like that anyway.

    7 votes