9 votes

The fastest train ever built: The SCMaglev

11 comments

  1. [5]
    KapteinB
    Link
    Also available on Nebula.
    2 votes
    1. [4]
      JXM
      Link Parent
      I’m a Nebula subscriber (got the CuriosityStream bundle after seeing the same ad 10,000 times). I love the content but man are their apps bad.

      I’m a Nebula subscriber (got the CuriosityStream bundle after seeing the same ad 10,000 times). I love the content but man are their apps bad.

      1 vote
      1. [3]
        cfabbro
        (edited )
        Link Parent
        Ditto, and agreed. And sadly Nebula doesn't even have apps for many popular streaming devices yet either, like my Amazon Fire TV sticks. Although some of them are supposedly "in development" now...

        Ditto, and agreed. And sadly Nebula doesn't even have apps for many popular streaming devices yet either, like my Amazon Fire TV sticks. Although some of them are supposedly "in development" now at least:

        https://nebula.app/faq

        Okay, what about Android TV, Roku, Fire TV, Xbox…?

        Apps for Android TV, Fire TV, and Roku are in development. As for all other platforms, it sort of depends on demand. We’re a small team, and while we’d love to offer 100% of our support to 100% of the available platforms, we’ll have to make some choices along the way.

        Thankfully CuriosityStream has a Fire TV app already though. It's a bit clunky but serviceable.

        1 vote
        1. KapteinB
          Link Parent
          Yep, no Nebula app for my smart TV or my PS4, so I only use it on my computer. There's a browser extension which improves the web app experience a bit, and another which makes me aware what...

          Yep, no Nebula app for my smart TV or my PS4, so I only use it on my computer. There's a browser extension which improves the web app experience a bit, and another which makes me aware what YouTube creators are also on Nebula.

          1 vote
        2. JXM
          Link Parent
          I remember reading from an AMA on Reddit that they only had two developers. Basically one to make the iOS/tvOS app and one to make the Android app.

          I remember reading from an AMA on Reddit that they only had two developers. Basically one to make the iOS/tvOS app and one to make the Android app.

          1 vote
  2. [6]
    Thra11
    (edited )
    Link
    At the risk of sounding like a naysayer, cool technology aside, this seems like an enormous waste of money and energy just to avoid changing Japanese corporate culture. Also, the assertion that a...

    At the risk of sounding like a naysayer, cool technology aside, this seems like an enormous waste of money and energy just to avoid changing Japanese corporate culture.

    Also, the assertion that a 40 or 67 minute transit time makes it possible for intercity commuting rings hollow to me. That's already far too long a commute to be doing willingly, and it doesn't take into account travel time to and from the maglev stations. Even with an efficient metro, you could be looking at adding 30 minutes each end.

    1 vote
    1. [5]
      JXM
      Link Parent
      While agree that 90 minutes is too long for a daily commute, there are millions of people who do it every day. I don’t get it, but I also live in a medium sized town where I can get across town in...

      While agree that 90 minutes is too long for a daily commute, there are millions of people who do it every day.

      I don’t get it, but I also live in a medium sized town where I can get across town in 20 minutes with heavy traffic. I left the major metro area I used to live in for that very reason. Getting anywhere was a massive pain in the ass.

      3 votes
      1. [3]
        Comment deleted by author
        Link Parent
        1. [2]
          JXM
          Link Parent
          I spent five years dealing with Atlanta traffic and vowed never to live in a city that size again for basically all the reasons you listed. To spend so much of my day sitting in traffic (and not...

          I spent five years dealing with Atlanta traffic and vowed never to live in a city that size again for basically all the reasons you listed. To spend so much of my day sitting in traffic (and not getting paid for it) seems absurd.

          2 votes
          1. [2]
            Comment deleted by author
            Link Parent
            1. JXM
              Link Parent
              I also think all of those things are important, so I ended up in a smaller college town (still around 250,000 people) that gives me all of the benefits of a smaller city with a lot of the cultural...

              I also think all of those things are important, so I ended up in a smaller college town (still around 250,000 people) that gives me all of the benefits of a smaller city with a lot of the cultural events that you mentioned above.

              It’s a great compromise between the two. I’m only two to three hours away from four or five major concert cities so if a smaller band I want to see hits one of those, I can make a day trip of it and see them.

              2 votes
      2. [2]
        Thra11
        Link Parent
        I know that some people do spend a long time commuting, and that there are some situations in which it makes sense. At one point, I was commuting 1:40 each way (cycle to station, 40 minute train...

        I know that some people do spend a long time commuting, and that there are some situations in which it makes sense. At one point, I was commuting 1:40 each way (cycle to station, 40 minute train journey, then cycle to work). However, I only kept it up because I knew it was temporary. It was my first proper job, and it was at a crappy company, but I knew that being currently employed doing a version of the job I was applying for looked infinitely better on my CV. If I had intended to stay in that job, I would definitely have looked for accommodation closer to it.

        So while sometimes life throws you into a situation where, for a while at least, it makes sense to commute long distances, I view it as a problem, or the symptom of a larger problem (e.g. there's no affordable housing in the same town as the jobs). As such, it seems bizarre to plan an expensive multi-decade-long development to provide for it rather than seeking to solve the root causes instead.

        If we rule out commuting, what other reason is there for massive amounts of people to flit between Tokyo, Nagoya and Osaka at high speed? Each city is plenty big enough that you should be able to find a home, jobs for yourself and family, schools and shops. So what does that leave? Leisure is surely less time critical. Business meetings, perhaps?

        3 votes
        1. JXM
          Link Parent
          I think the obvious answer to your question is that people could just work from home. Obviously that’s not something everyone can do, but most white collar jobs can be done remotely at least part...

          I think the obvious answer to your question is that people could just work from home. Obviously that’s not something everyone can do, but most white collar jobs can be done remotely at least part of the time.

          As for why that line should exist other than commuting, I’d simply say that it provides an easy way to connect the two cities for tourism and such.

          4 votes